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Geronimo: An American Legend (1993) Poster

Trivia

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Jason Patric showed his considerable horsemanship in the scene where he has a one-on-one showdown with an Apache warrior. Patric goes from laying across his horse prone on the ground, to ordering the horse back onto its feet while he mounts it as it quickly rolls upright - rifle in one hand, reins in the other.
Jason Patric beat Patrick Swayze and Alec Baldwin to the main role.
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According to a interview with Walter Hill, he never liked the title of the movie "Geronimo: An American Legend" because he never felt the movie was about Geronimo but about the men who had caught Geronimo.
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Tom Horn and The Apache Kid were not portrayed in "Geronimo, An American Legend" Most accounts have them as being instrumental in the capture of Geronimo.
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The part of Al Sieber was expanded when Robert Duvall was cast. The character of Sieber was meant to ride off into the sunset at the end of the movie but during filming Walter Hill felt that the running time was going to be too long and so decided to kill off the character. "If I'd known I was going to die I might not have done the movie," said Duvall. "I've died nine times in films." However part of Duvall's deal to make the film did mean his company, Butcher's Run Films, signed a deal with Columbia.
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Walter Hill had a development deal at Carolco. They approached him wanting to make a Western that focused on an Indian and Hill was enthusiastic. He initially considering doing a movie on Crazy Horse "but for various reasons I thought it was a little too difficult." Eventually Geronimo was selected and John Milius hired to write a draft. "I like Geronimo just as he was, a human predator," said Milius.
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According to Walter Hill, John Milius' screenplay was more inclusive of Geronimo's early years and Milius was reluctant to revise it so he had it rewritten by Hill and Larry Gross. "This movie certainly presents a heroic view of Geronimo," said Hill.
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The film had a mixed reception from critics, but was praised by Native American groups.
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Another film on Geronimo came out around the same time, a made-for-TV movie.
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Walter Hill felt the title of the film should have been The Geronimo War. "The conception was you make the film from the last time he came in and broke off and was sent away," he said. "The last time he broke off the reservations. This had been a recurring pattern. I thought that would be more accurate."
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According to Walter Hill, there is a longer version to the movie, he was forced to cut it down by 12 minutes; in his own words, he describes the version as a "damn good" version and felt that the studio should released that version on DVD.
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The tune playing during the Indian hanging, and later while Crook and Sieber discuss their retirement, is an instrumental version of the traditional gospel song "I Am A Poor Wayfaring Stranger."
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

While Al Sieber is not actually shown dying, the implication is strongly made. "I never thought I'd get killed trying to help save an Apache. ...I'm going to catch me a little sleep here for...a minute or two." In fact, despite much fighting and many wounds, Al Sieber died in 1907 when he was working on a road near Roosevelt Lake in Arizona when a boulder he was excavating fell on him.

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