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31 underrated movies well worth a look

Simon Brew Aug 18, 2017

Looking for a film to watch, that you might not have considered before? Try some of these...

Sometimes, we figure, you come to a site like this just to find out about a film you didn’t know about. That you want recommendations of movies that you might not otherwise have uncovered. This list, then, has no theme, save that the films on it are really good, and didn’t get much of an audience first time around. That, or they seem to have been forgotten. It’s a real mix, but hopefully, there’s something on here that appeals..

The Brady Bunch Movie

The Brady Bunch films never really seemed to do much business in the UK, and that’s a real pity. No foreknowledge of the series is required, and the first movie takes the Brady film and transplants them into 1990s America, with no
See full article at Den of Geek »

Trailer Watch: History Is Made in Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy’s House”

“Viceroy’s House”

“I am to be the last Viceroy of India and I shall carry out the role with great pride,” says Lord Louis Montbatten (Hugh Bonneville, “Downton Abbey”) in a new trailer for Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy’s House.” But Montbatten doesn’t think his historic post will be easy or straightforward, and admits that “new nations are rarely born in peace.”

“Viceroy’s House in Delhi was the home of the British rulers of India. After 300 years, that rule was coming to an end. For six months in 1947, Lord Mountbatten, great grandson of Queen Victoria, assumed the post of the last Viceroy, charged with handing India back to its people,” the film’s official synopsis details. Set in 1947, “Viceroy’s House” “unfolds within that great house. Upstairs lived Mountbatten together with his wife and daughter; downstairs lived their 500 Hindu, Muslim, and Sikh servants. As the political elite — Nehru, Jinnah, and Gandhi — converged on the House to wrangle over the birth of independent India, conflict erupted.”

The action-packed trailer shows some of that conflict, and alludes to tensions between Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims. “Whatever their differences are, all Indians have one thing in common: they can’t wait to get rid of us,” Montbatten says.

It’s not all political drama, though. “Viceroy’s” House” also features a plot about star-crossed lovers, a Hindu servant (Manish Dayal, “Halt and Catch Fire”) and a Muslim woman (Huma Qureishi, “Gangs of Wasseypur”).

Bhaji on the Beach,” “Bride & Prejudice,” and “Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging” are among Chadha’s directing credits. Next, she will helm the WWII-set “Song for a Spy.” Penned by Farrukh Dhondy (“Exitz”), the film is set in France and Germany and centers on a female Indian spy.

Chadha is also developing projects for TV via her production company, Bend It TV. She has said she is interested in “great content that is effortlessly diverse” — no matter the medium. “My brand has always had a global reach and represents British storytelling, but from a diverse perspective,” she explained.

“Viceroy’s House” hits VOD and theaters September 1. Moira Buffini (“Harlots”) and frequent Chadha collaborator Paul Mayeda Berges penned the script. Gillian Anderson (“The Fall”) co-stars.

https://medium.com/media/c65e21d6ee065f7a08432e04a2b816cc/href

Trailer Watch: History Is Made in Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy’s House” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cannes Update: Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy’s House” Gets U.S. Distribution

“Viceroy’s House”

“Viceroy’s House” has found a U.S. home. IFC acquired the U.S. rights to the period drama from “Bend It Like Beckham” director Gurinder Chadha at the Cannes market, The Hollywood Reporter writes. The film is currently playing in the UK, but no word on a U.S. release date yet.

Written by Moira Buffini (“Harlots”) and frequent Chadha collaborator Paul Mayeda Berges, “Viceroy’s House” is set during the 1947 Partition — when India’s independence led to the bloody division of its territory. “Downton Abbey’s” Hugh Bonneville portrays the viceroy, Lord Louis Mountbatten, and Gillian Anderson (“The Fall,” “The X-Files”) plays his wife, Lady Edwina Mountbatten. Michael Gambon (“Harry Potter” franchise), Simon Callow (“Outlander”), Manish Dayal (“Halt and Catch Fire”), Huma Qureshi (“Jolly Llb 2”), and Om Puri (“The Hundred-Foot Journey”) round out the rest of the cast. The film made its world premiere at the Berlinale in February.

Bhaji on the Beach,” “Bride & Prejudice,” and “Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging” are among Chadha’s directing credits. Next, she will helm the WWII-set “Song for a Spy.” Penned by Farrukh Dhondy (“Exitz”), the film is set in France and Germany and centers on a female Indian spy.

Chadha is also developing projects for TV via her production company, Bend It TV. She has said she is interested in “great content that is effortlessly diverse” — no matter the medium. “My brand has always had a global reach and represents British storytelling, but from a diverse perspective,” she explained. Chadha recently donated her entire working archive to the British Film Institute’s National Archive.

Cannes Update: Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy’s House” Gets U.S. Distribution was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Gurinder Chadha Moves to TV with FremantleMedia-Backed Bend It TV

Gurinder Chadha: Red Carpet News TV/YouTube

Gurinder Chadha is branching out into television. The “Bend It Like Beckham” director’s TV production company, Bend It TV, will receive 25 percent backing from FremantleMedia, Variety writes. Bend It TV aims to develop “upscale scripted content” as well as non-scripted content and other entertainment formats. According to the source, the deal stemmed from Fremantle drama chief Sarah Doole’s efforts to expand the company’s number of scripted series.

Planning to use the medium to tell “stories on a big scale,” Chadha believes working in TV will allow her to share her work globally. “The audience now picks and chooses because of the [different] platforms,” she emphasized. “For someone like me who has always been trying to tell different kinds of stories, finally an audience can have access to them. That is the most exciting thing for a filmmaker like me, someone who wants to tell stories about people on the margins, or hidden histories and voices, and bringing them to the fore.”

Although she is best known as a film director, Variety reveals that Chadha began her career on Channel 4’s “The Media Show” in the UK and is happy to return to her roots. “In my experience of late, television is much more open and responsive these days than the British film industry at getting those stories out there, getting them produced, made, and on screens,” she observed.

Describing her approach to storytelling — in any medium — Chadha said she is interested in “great content that is effortlessly diverse.” Expanding on that idea, she added, “My brand has always had a global reach and represents British storytelling, but from a diverse perspective.”

According to Variety, Chadha is especially excited to work with Fremantle due to its inclusion of women like Doole and CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz in senior leadership roles. “I am working with bright, intelligent women at the top of their game, and we have a shorthand. When I pitch a story or idea they get it, so it allows me to be more productive,” Chadha explained.

The respect is mutual. Frot-Coutaz commented, “Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her. When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world, and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

Chadha made her feature directorial debut with 1993’s “Bhaji on the Beach.” “I was the first Indian woman to direct a feature film in Britain,” she said of the experience, “and now I’m still the only Asian woman directing feature films in the British film industry. That shows how hard it is to get out there.”

Since “Bhaji,” Chadha has directed “Bend It Like Beckham,” “Bride & Prejudice,” the short film “Quais de Seine,” “Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging,” and “It’s a Wonderful Afterlife.” Her latest film, “Viceroy’s House,” is set during the 1947 Partition — when India’s independence led to the bloody division of its territory. It is currently playing in the UK.

Next, Chadha will helm “Song for a Spy,” about a female Indian World War II spy. She recently donated her entire working archive to the British Film Institute’s National Archive.

Gurinder Chadha Moves to TV with FremantleMedia-Backed Bend It TV was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Bend It Like Beckham’ Director Gurinder Chadha Teams With FremantleMedia for Drive Into TV (Exclusive)

‘Bend It Like Beckham’ Director Gurinder Chadha Teams With FremantleMedia for Drive Into TV (Exclusive)
British director Gurinder Chadha, best known for movies like “Bend It Like Beckham” and “Viceroy’s House,” is accelerating her drive into television production with the backing of global production giant FremantleMedia.

FremantleMedia, which has been expanding its scripted slate under drama chief Sarah Doole, will take a 25% stake in Chadha’s television production company Bend It TV, which is focusing on upscale scripted content.

FremantleMedia CEO Cecile Frot-Coutaz said: “Gurinder is a phenomenal storyteller and a real auteur; I’m thrilled to be working with her. When we set out to build our scripted business, at the top of my list was working with and supporting the best creative talent in the world, and this new partnership truly exemplifies that goal.”

Chadha, who was awarded an OBE for services to the British film industry in 2006, has directed films such as “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003), “Bride and Prejudice” (2004) and “Angus, Thongs
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Viceroy's House' Director Gurinder Chadha Donates Archive to British Film Institute

'Viceroy's House' Director Gurinder Chadha Donates Archive to British Film Institute
Just weeks after her latest film, Viceroy's House, had its world premiere in Berlin, Gurinder Chadha has donated her entire working archive to the British Film Institute's National Archive. 

The BFI helped produced the Punjabi-British filmmaker's breakthrough, the 1989 documentary I'm British but.... Since then, Chadha has directed features such as 1993's BAFTA-nominated Bhaji on the Beach and Bend It Like Beckham, which smashed box-office records for a British film in 2002, alongside titles such as Bride and Prejudice (2004), Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging (2008) and It's a Wonderful Afterlife (2010).

She was awarded an Order of the British Empire award in 2006 for...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Viceroy’s House’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Viceroy’s House’
To begin at the very end, the closing credits of “Viceroy’s House” bear a detailed dedication to a woman who survived the devastating upheaval of the 1947 Partition of India, was forced to trek a vast distance from her home to the newly founded Muslim republic of Pakistan, and was finally reunited with her eventual husband in a refugee camp. The woman in question, it turns out, is director Gurinder Chadha’s grandmother, and her story is evidently a remarkable one — so one can’t help but wish that Chadha had elected to tell it directly in this stiff historical dramatization of events leading to the Partition. Instead, “Viceroy’s House” clumsily merges a waxworks biographical study of Lord Louis and Lady Edwina Mountbatten, the last Viceroy and Vicereine appointed to oversee the British handover of India, with a passionless Romeo-and-Juliet romance between two of their servants caught in the fray.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlin: Gurinder Chadha Talks 'Viceroy's House,' Om Puri and Why Ken Loach Deserves a BAFTA

Berlin: Gurinder Chadha Talks 'Viceroy's House,' Om Puri and Why Ken Loach Deserves a BAFTA
Twenty-four years after she burst on the scene with Bhaji on the Beach and 15 years after she introduced the world to Keira Knightley with Bend it Like Beckham, Gurinder Chadha heads to Berlin to showcase her latest film, Viceroy's House.

Set in the final days of British colonial rule in India, the historical drama focuses on Lord Mountbatten (Hugh Bonneville, of course) as he prepares for the deadly partition in 1947 that would see a country divided and a new nation, Pakistan, created.

Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter, Chadha discussed offering a different viewpoint on Mountbatten's legacy, working with the late, great...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Meera Syal webchat – as it happened

The actor and author of new novel The House of Hidden Mothers answered your questions in a live webchat – from why she changed her name to her advice on writing without stereotypes, via her distaste for mince, catch up with her answers now

2.11pm BST

Thanks all for your comments, questions, and making me laugh. Have a lovely summer.

Thanks everyone for your questions, and thanks to Meera. Until next time!

2.10pm BST

Youoffmyplanet asks:

Hi Meera, you were wonderful in Behind the Beautiful Forevers – were you surprised to find that it had taken so long to get an all-Asian cast on the Olivier Stage?

Ta for that. Loved doing that production. We all did as a company - we were aware we were making a little bit of history. I guess I shouldn't be surprised about how long things take any more, I'm just glad it's done, and hopefully
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ealing Studios Acquires Stake in GreenAcre Films as TV Expansion Continues

London — London’s Ealing Studios is looking to further expand its TV division by acquiring a significant stake in production company GreenAcre Films, and forging a creative partnership with the company. Earlier this year, ITV commissioned Ealing to produce two stand-alone films based on the “Maigret” novels, starring Rowan Atkinson.

Ealing’s stake in Greenacre will see them develop an “ambitious and innovative” TV slate for both U.K. and international broadcasters. This is the first of what Ealing says will be many new partnerships at the newly restructured Ealing, which is headed by Ben Latham-Jones.

GreenAcre was co-founded by Nadine Marsh-Edwards and Amanda Jenks in 2010 and became a division of Wall to Wall in 2012. They will continue to co-produce their current drama slate, which includes projects for HBO, BBC and ITV. As well as developing TV projects, they will also expand their feature film roster, which already has a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Ealing Studios Acquires Stake in GreenAcre Films as TV Expansion Continues

London — London’s Ealing Studios is looking to further expand its TV division by acquiring a significant stake in production company GreenAcre Films, and forging a creative partnership with the company. Earlier this year, ITV commissioned Ealing to produce two stand-alone films based on the “Maigret” novels, starring Rowan Atkinson.

Ealing’s stake in Greenacre will see them develop an “ambitious and innovative” TV slate for both U.K. and international broadcasters. This is the first of what Ealing says will be many new partnerships at the newly restructured Ealing, which is headed by Ben Latham-Jones.

GreenAcre was co-founded by Nadine Marsh-Edwards and Amanda Jenks in 2010 and became a division of Wall to Wall in 2012. They will continue to co-produce their current drama slate, which includes projects for HBO, BBC and ITV. As well as developing TV projects, they will also expand their feature film roster, which already has a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ealing Studios acquires 'GreenAcre Films' stake

  • ScreenDaily
Ealing Studios has acquired a significant stake in TV and film company GreenAcre Films and forged a new creative partnership with the company that will see Ealing Studios expand its TV division.

Having already announced earlier this year the ITV commission of Maigret for two stand-alone films starring Rowan Atkinson, Ealing Studios’ stake in GreenAcre will see them develop a TV slate for both UK and international broadcasters.

It marks the first partnership at the newly restructured Ealing Studios headed by Ben Latham-Jones.

Co-founded by Nadine Marsh-Edwards and Amanda Jenks in 2010, GreenAcre Films became a division of Wall to Wall in 2012. It will continue to co-produce its current drama slate, which includes projects for HBO, BBC and ITV.

As well as developing new TV projects, GreenAcre will also expand its feature film roster which already has a number of titles in development with the BFI.

In a joint statement, GreenAcre co-founders Nadine Marsh-Edwards and Amanda Jenks said:
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Desi Rascals: why British Asians fare best on reality TV

Gurinder Chadhas British Asian take on Towie is coming. From the Siddiquis on Gogglebox to Musharaf on Educating Yorkshire, reality TV has done us proud

Television drama can be a two-dimensional place for British Asian characters. When theyre not diagnosing an ailment from the surgery floor or donning a robe in the courtroom, theyre in a dingy basement somewhere, putting together a weapon of mass destruction, angrily ordering an honour killing or attempting to extricate themselves from a loveless arranged marriage.

Hope has come in the unexpected form of Desi Rascals, a new show from Bend It Like Beckham and Bhaji on the Beach director Gurinder Chadha. Produced by Tony Wood, the co-creator of The Only Way is Essex, and ordered by Sky Living, the scripted reality show will follow a cast of multigenerational British Asian characters for 12 episodes. In a statement, Chadha said: Ive been wanting for a long
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Zohra Sehgal, Centurian Bollywood Actress, Dies

Zohra Sehgal, Centurian Bollywood Actress, Dies
Zohra Sehgal, a veteran Bollywood character actress, who was featured in such English-language films as “Bend It Like Beckham,” “The Mystic Masseur” and “Mistress of Spices” as well as Hindi hits like “Hum dil de chuke sanam,” “Kal ho naa ho” and “Cheeni Kum” died Thursday in a New Delhi hospital of a heart attack. She was 102 years old.

A favorite of helmer Gurinder Chadha, Sehgal played a censorious grandmother who later unbends in “Bhaji on the Beach,” as well as a fun-loving older relative in “Bend It Like Beckham” and “Mistress of Spices,” which was written by Chadha and directed by her husband, Paul Berges. With her charming smile and twinkling eyes, she made the perfect aged relative in film and TV.

Born Sahibzadi Zohra Begum Mumtaz-ullah Khan, the vivacious woman preferred a career over marriage at a time when that was considered revolutionary. She studied ballet in Dresden,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bollywood legend Zohra Sehgal dies aged 102

Legendary Bollywood actress Zohra Sehgal has died at her home in New Delhi on Thursday at the age of 102. Born on 27 April 1912 in Uttar Pradesh, Sehgal began her career as a dancer before slowly progressing on to films. She made her film debut in K.A. Abbas’s Dharti Ke Lal (1946) and went on to work in Chetan Anand’s Neecha Nagar (1946), a film which acquired international attention and went on to win the prestigious Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival that year.

Though Zohra Sehgal has had her presence felt over many decades within the Indian film industry; many from today’s generation will know her for her senior roles in films like Dil Se (1998), Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam (1999) and Veer-Zaara (2004). She has even played the role of Amitabh Bachchan’s mother in the acclaimed hit Cheeni Kum (2007). In addition, Sehgal has starred in international projects such
See full article at Bollyspice »

Gurinder Chadha’s Bhaji is as tangy today as yesterday

“The film was screened at Angelika [Film Center], or was it Lincoln Center? I don’t quite remember now,” quipped Gurinder Chadha while recalling her visit to New York from twenty years ago for the screening of her debut film, Bhaji on the Beach.

The British filmmaker is at Village East Cinema in downtown Manhattan, where the New York Indian Film Festival is celebrating the twentieth anniversary of her iconic film. “I hadn’t expected the response it got then. Janet Maslin from The New York Times reviewed it, though I didn’t understand that it was a big deal!” she said. Later, when the Los Angeles Times carried a full-page review of the film, Chadha gauged its popularity across cities in the United States.

Bhaji on the Beach is a day in the lives of three generations of British Indian women who travel together from their home in Birmingham to Blackpool,
See full article at Bollyspice »

Nyiff 2014: Opening Night Gala Red Carpet Moments

Nagesh Kukunoor and Anurag Kashyap aren’t showing their films for the first time at the New York Indian Film Festival. But many young filmmakers are. Take a look at the opening night gala of the fourteenth edition of the festival as it kickstarts the weeklong celebration of the best of art house cinema from India. It opened on Monday, May 5 with the screening of Kashyap’s hard-hitting new film Ugly. Shelly Walia brings you the latest news and interviews from the red carpet at New York’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts.

Festival director Aseem Chhabra smiles, but shies away from looking into the camera. Earlier in the day, he tweeted, “Are you guys ready for the… six-day movie tamasha?”

Aroon Shivdasani, executive director of Indo-American Arts Council, said the festival is an opportunity to screen films that tell a story about, say, real India. “Those films deserve to be watched.
See full article at Bollyspice »

“The Nyiff brings Indian films New Yorkers may never watch otherwise.” – Aseem Chhabra

This coming week the oldest and largest Indian film festival in North America will inundate the cultural fabric of New York City with award-winning, cutting-edge and entertaining films from the Indian subcontinent.

The New York Indian Film Festival, now in its fourteenth edition, is set to screen more than 40 films—features, short narratives and documentaries—from at least four South Asian countries. Organized by the Indo-American Arts Council, the week-long festival will mark the New York premiere screening of director-producer Anurag Kashyap’s widely admired thriller Ugly. It will be the second time for Kashyap at the festival, whose film Gangs of Wasseypur was the closing night film two years ago.

This time the closing film is acclaimed Bengali auteur Aparna Sen’s Goynar Baksho (The Jewelry Box), a film based on a novel of the same name. The centerpiece film is Malayalam director Geethu Mohandas’ Liar’s Dice – which
See full article at Bollyspice »

Director Gurinder Chadha in an Exclusive Interview talks Bhaji, Bend It and Much More

On May 6th, British filmmaker Gurinder Chadha (Bend it Like Beckham) will have her work showcased at the prestigious New York Indian Film Festival. They will be highlighting Bhaji on the Beach, which debuted 20 years ago, if you can believe it. Her debut feature film tells the tale of group of women of Indian descent who take a trip together from their home in Birmingham, England to the beach resort of Blackpool. As the trip progresses we learn more about these women and the issues in their lives. In case you haven’t seen it, I won’t spoil, but I will say it ends up being a life-changing trip. Not only that, Nyiff will also present a retrospective of Chadha’s first films – a series of documentaries for the BBC.

I got the amazing chance to chat with Ms. Chadha about her career and we talked about Bhaji on the Beach,
See full article at Bollyspice »

Check out the full lineup to be showcased at the 14th Annual New York Indian Film Festival

The New York Indian Film Festival (Nyiff) announced the full lineup last night for their 14th year of celebrating independent, art house, alternate, and Diaspora films from/about/connected to the Indian subcontinent (May 5 – 10) at the SoHo Tiffin Junction. Dedicated to bringing these films to a New York audience, the festival will feature 34 screenings (23 narrative, 11 documentary) –all seen for the first time in New York City.

The festival highlights various cinemas of India’s different regions – Marathi, Bengali and two films from the Northeast. In addition the festival covers cinemas from the neighboring South Asian countries – four films by Pakistani filmmakers, two from Sri Lanka – a feature and a documentary, and one from Nepal.

The festival’s Marathi films include Postcard and multiple-award winning films Astu and Fandry. Directed by Nagraj Manjule, Fandry received rave reviews in India, winning the grand jury prize at the Mumbai Film Festival in October
See full article at Bollyspice »
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