Arizona Dream (1993) - News Poster

(1993)

News

Peter Travers on Jerry Lewis: The Ultimate Funnyman as Total Filmmaker

Peter Travers on Jerry Lewis: The Ultimate Funnyman as Total Filmmaker
I annoyed Jerry Lewis once by asking him about The Day the Clown Cried, a movie he starred in and directed in 1972, and then refused to release. "It's awful," said Lewis of the Holocaust drama in which he starred as a circus clown who entertains Jewish children as he leads them to their deaths in Nazi gas chambers. Why not show it and let the world decide? "I'm ashamed of it," Lewis told me flatly. When I pressed him, he flashed a look that could be subtitled "End of Discussion.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jerry Lewis dies, aged 91

Tony Sokol Aug 21, 2017

Versatile, innovative and controversial, Jerry Lewis leaves a legacy of laughs and charity work.

Jerry Lewis, the legendary comedian, actor, singer and philanthropist, has died at the age of 91.

Lewis is as well known for starring and directing films like The Nutty Professor, Cinderfella, and The Bellboy as he is for his marathon fundraising telethons on Us TV for Muscular Dystrophy. He first found fame with his legendary ten-year partnership with Dean Martin.

Lewis paired with Dean Martin in 1946. Starting in nightclubs, Martin and Lewis moved their way through almost countless radio shows and made 16 movies. The pair costarred in such films as My Friend Irma (1949), At War With the Army (1950), Sailor Beware (1952), The Caddy (1953), Living It Up (1954), You’re Never Too Young (1955), and Artists And Models (1955). The last movie they made together was Hollywood Or Bust (1956).

After the partnership ended, Lewis teamed with director Frank Tashlin
See full article at Den of Geek »

R.I.P. Jerry Lewis (1926 – 2017)

Legendary American comedian, actor, filmmaker and singer Jerry Lewis has passed away at his home in Las Vegas, aged 91.

Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1926, Lewis began his career as an entertainer in the 1940s and initially rose to prominence as part of the double-act Martin and Lewis with Dean Martin.

After finding success on the club circuit, radio and television, the duo made the switch to the big screen in 1949’s Mr Friend Irma, and followed that up with the sequel My Friend Irma Goes West. They would then go on to headline a total of sixteen movies together for producer Hal B. Wallis between 1951 and 1956, before going their separate ways.

Going solo, Lewis would soon begin writing and directing his own projects, including the likes of The Bellboy, The Ladies Man, The Errand Boy and The Nutty Professor, as well as the unreleased The Day the Clown Cried.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Drugs and Alcohol Onscreen: Here’s How Actors Fake Their Vices

  • Indiewire
Drugs and Alcohol Onscreen: Here’s How Actors Fake Their Vices
Have you ever wondered what fake drugs and alcohol seen in movies are made of? Prop experts Jeff Butcher (“The Wrestler”) and Eric Cheripka (“American Gangster”) have revealed some tricks of the trade via Refinery29.

For cocaine, Butcher usually uses inositol, a vitamin found in plants and animals that is commonly used to cut the real drug. “It’ll give you a slight energy lift because it’s a Vitamin B,” he said. The vitamin gives people such a strong lift that, according to Butcher, while filming “The Wrestler,” Mickey Rourke asked him, “Are you sure there’s nothing in this, I feel like I’m getting a lift?”

Read More: ‘Take the 10’ Trailer: Tony Revolori’s Netflix Comedy Involves Drugs, Car Chases and Andy Samberg

In a perfect world, the drug would look as realistic as possible in appearance without actors having to actually snort any substance. To accomplish that,
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: Johnny Depp Turns Cold-Blooded Mob Boss In The New Trailer For Crime Drama ‘Black Mass’

Did Johnny Depp show up to play this time? Depp's career direction these days seems to be the opposite of the daring and quixotic choices in the halcyon years when he was working with Tim Burton one day (“Ed Wood”), Emir Kuristica (“Arizona Dream”) the next, and Jim Jarmusch (“Dead Man”) the following day. Now the actor’s career seems to be dictated by what his audience wants, or the bundles of cash they send his way after starring in the umpteenth ‘Pirates’ movie. Could this all change with the crime drama “Black Mass,” which looks like it could even be fall film contender? Already demonstrating some ‘Godfather’-ish tones in its early photos and the trailer, in “Black Mass,” Depp puts vanity away and stars as a cold-blooded and infamous true-life mob boss from Boston. Here’s the official synopsis: In 1970s South Boston, FBI Agent John Connolly persuades
See full article at The Playlist »

St Petersburg Forum examines Russian co-pros

  • ScreenDaily
St Petersburg Forum examines Russian co-pros
A roundup of news from the inaugural St Petersburg International Media Forum includes a busy French delegation and a local controversy brewing over Leviathan.

The King Of Madagascar, a kind of Russian answer to the pirate adventure films à la Pirates of the Caribbean, is being set up as a $ 16m international co-production by producer-director Oleg Ryaskov’s Moscow-based Bft Movie.

Speaking at the opening of St Petersburg International Media Forum’s (Spimf) co-production market this morning, producer Ryaskov revealed that the project - which is based on real historical events abouta Russian expedition by Peter The Great to the island of Madagascar in danger of being thwarted by Great Britain’s King George - has Spain’s Smartline Spain and the Us casting company Scott Carlson Entertainment on board as partners and is currently in talks with French and German production companies to join.

Ryaskov added that he intends to have American, European and Russian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

St Petersburg Forum examines state of Russian co-productions

  • ScreenDaily
St Petersburg Forum examines state of Russian co-productions
A roundup of news from the inaugural St Petersburg International Media Forum includes a busy French delegation and a local controversy brewing over Leviathan.

The King Of Madagascar, a kind of Russian answer to the pirate adventure films à la Pirates of the Caribbean, is being set up as a $ 16m international co-production by producer-director Oleg Ryaskov’s Moscow-based Bft Movie.

Speaking at the opening of St Petersburg International Media Forum’s (Spimf) co-production market this morning, producer Ryaskov revealed that the project - which is based on real historical events abouta Russian expedition by Peter The Great to the island of Madagascar in danger of being thwarted by Great Britain’s King George - has Spain’s Smartline Spain and the Us casting company Scott Carlson Entertainment on board as partners and is currently in talks with French and German production companies to join.

Ryaskov added that he intends to have American, European and Russian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Daily | Cronenberg, Lynch, Maddin

  • Keyframe
Jonathan Lethem's reviewed David Cronenberg's first novel, Consumed, for the New York Times. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Morgan Meis on David Lynch's paintings and films; Jonathan Rosenbaum on Guy Maddin's The Saddest Music in the World (2003); Adrian Martin on Emir Kusturica's Arizona Dream (1993); Reverse Shot on three films by Martin Scorsese; Nick Pinkerton on Hype Williams's Belly (1998); and from the New Yorker's archive, six classic profiles: Diane Keaton, Angela Bassett, Julia Roberts, Tilda Swinton, Katharine Hepburn and Cate Blanchett. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

When Movie Stars Act Weird

When Movie Stars Act Weird
As problems go, it’s a pretty First World one to be saddled with. You’re a movie star pocketing obscene paychecks to appear in Hollywood blockbusters. But something is missing. Fame and box office success alone aren’t why you started making movies. You are an actor If only your fans could see just how cool and fearless and devoted to the craft you really are. What to do? Worry not. There’s a well-trod path laid out that will put this plight behind you once and for all: You will make a boldly uncommercial art film. The weirder,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

LatinoBuzz: Alex Rivera Puts Activism in Front of & Behind the Camera in Two New Music Videos

  • Sydney's Buzz
The National Day Laborer Organizing Network, a broad coalition of immigration activists, has teamed up with indie film director Alex Rivera (Sleep Dealer) to use the power of culture, specifically film and music in the form of music videos, to highlight the dire need for immigration reform. Earlier this year LatinoBuzz spoke to Rivera about making political films and his interest in the border. We share his answers here.

LatinoBuzz: Alex, you are not Mexican. Can you talk about why the U.S.-Mexico border has been such an important part of your work?

Rivera: My father is Peruvian, my mom was born in Brooklyn, of Scottish descent. I grew up in something of a "borderland" with icons of Peru around the house in which I watched "Gilligan's Island." But that's not the real reason to be interested in the border, and interested in the relationship between the U.S. and Mexico. Anyone who's seriously interested in the future of America - and therefore the future of the world - needs to consider the deep, deep connections between the U.S., Mexico, and Latin America. These are histories that are as intertwined as those of Great Britain and India. Or Palestine and Israel. You can't understand one without the other.

LatinoBuzz: Which came first your interest in politics or becoming a filmmaker? Were your films always political or did you evolve as a filmmaker?

Rivera: For a long time I've worked from the belief that Every Film Is Political. It's impossible to make a non-political film. Every time you make a decision about theme, location, cast, etc., you're making a decision that puts certain people and certain points-of-view in the center of the frame. And inevitably, you're also pushing other people and themes to the margins. Always. So the question any thoughtful filmmaker must confront is: who do I want to put in the center? Whose point-of-view do I want to explore?

In his most recent project, through powerful stories, told in music videos and using impassioned songs, Rivera is able to convey what statistics cannot. The intense emotional toll that living life under the constant threat of deportation can take on undocumented immigrants, their families, and entire communities. As the director of both "El Hielo" by the eclectic L.A.-based band La Santa Cecilia and soul singer Aloe Blacc’s acoustic rendition of his hit single "Wake Me Up," Rivera chose real-life day laborers, activists, and family members of deported immigrants as subjects in the music videos. Check out both music videos and their featured cast below.

Aloe Blacc "Wake Me Up"

The Cast

Hareth Andrade Ayala is an immigrants' rights leader in the state of Virginia. She has spent her teen years traveling across the nation to share her family's story. And recently to fight to stop her own father's deportation.

Margarita Reyes is a Los Angeles actress and producer whose first guest star appearance on prime time was opposite Emmy-award winning actress Alfre Woodard on the television series The Practice. She is currently starring in the film "Combat Ready". Despite being born in the Us, Margarita was deported as a child alongside her mother. Much of her work focuses on the issues of Latino and immigrant youth.

Agustin Chiprez Alvarez has been in the Us for 18 years. He is a proud father of an infant son and, like in the video, seeks work on Los Angeles day laborer corners to provide for his family. He is a songwriter and first became involved in acting through fellow actor Jose Mangandi at Teatro Jornalero.

La Santa Cecilia "El Hielo (Ice)"

The Cast

At age 9, Katherine Figueroa, came home from school and turned on the television only to become witness to the arrest of her own parents by Sheriff Arpaio's deputies. She led children’s marches at the capitol, testified in Congress, and successfully organized their temporary release. Her efforts are featured in the full-length documentary, Two Americans.

Erika Andiola is a nationally recognized leader in the undocumented immigrant youth movement. A graduate of Arizona State University, she moved from Mexico to Arizona when she was 11 years old and later became a co-founder of DRM Capitol Group and the Arizona Dream Act Coalition (Adac). When Ice raided her home and took her mother and older brother, Erika’s case became nationally known when she mobilized hundreds of thousands to stop their deportations.

Maria Arreola (Erika's mom) came to the United States to provide a better life for her children. Saying that they were following-up on a previous traffic stop, Ice agents arrested Maria and her son this past winter. After being detained, she was placed on a bus to be deported to Mexico only to have it turned around as a result of the national outcry organized by her daughter. She was given one year of deferred action but may face deportation orders again in 2014.

Juan Romero is a day laborer who looks for work outside a Los Angeles Home Depot where he meets contractors for temporary home construction jobs. He has been an actor in the community drama troupe, Teatro Jornalero, since 2010. He hasn't seen his wife since he came to the Us.

Isaac Barrera is an undocumented immigrant and organizer with the Immigrant Youth Coalition in Los Angeles. Isaac spent two and a half weeks in detention after being purposefully arrested by border patrol in Alabama in order to expose the inhumane treatment of immigrants in detention. His case is still pending.

Written by Vanessa Erazo. LatinoBuzz is a weekly feature on SydneysBuzz that highlights Latino indie talent and upcoming trends in Latino film with the specific objective of presenting a broad range of Latino voices. Follow @LatinoBuzz on Twitter and Facebook.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Don't Worry We'll Think Of A Title

MGM's been releasing out-of-print selections from its library for a while now; while it's been nice to show oddities like Arizona Dream the light of day, this process has also unearthed some residual byproducts of the studio system that probably didn't need to exist in the first place. Don't Worry We'll Think Of A Title is just such a film. Inept, irritating, and profoundly unfunny, Title simply wreaks of non-effort on the part of a few creative people, talented and otherwise. It may occupy some time while you're waiting to die or other morose activity, but under no circumstances go out of your way to see it.

Read more...
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Daily Briefing. Senses of Cinema 61 and More of the Best of 2011

  • MUBI
Bulle Ogier and Jacques Rivette on the set of L'Amour fou

Photo by Pierre Zucca

In the last issue of Senses of Cinema, Daniel Fairfax reviewed Douglas Morrey and Alison Smith's Jacques Rivette, and now, for Issue 61, Mary Wiles has allowed the editors to choose a chapter from her forthcoming Jacques Rivette. Rolando Caputo's decided to go with the one on L'amour fou (1969) for a number of reasons, but primarily because "the film seems the point of historical conjunction between the end of one wave and the coming of a second wave of filmmakers that washed up in its undertow. At a stretch, one can see the shadow of this film on the cinema of Jean Eustache, Maurice Pialat, Philippe Garrel and others. L'amour fou is a great and wondrous film." And he's running Rivette's 1950 essay "We Are Not Innocent Anymore" as well.

Also in this issue: Marko Bauer,
See full article at MUBI »

Emir Kusturica On City Building And A New Renaissance

Fresh off an Ecuadorian tour with his No Smoking Orchestra, the twice-awarded Palme d’Or director Emir Kusturica flew to Morocco for the closest thing he can get to downtime. As President of the Jury of the 11th annual Marrakech International Film Festival, Kusturica got to enjoy one of his favorite pastimes, absorbing a dozen or so independent films from around the world in a week. His second time at the festival, the auteur was honored with the Golden Star award in 2009 for his outstanding career.

While he spent most of the festival behind the scenes, apart from presenting a new Golden Star to another like-minded conspirator, Terry Gilliam, Kusturica granted us a rare interview at La Mamounia in a dark intimate conference room. He detailed what he’s up to when he’s not busy being a professional Jury President, and it’s a doozy. To call Kusturica a renaissance man is an understatement.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

The Rum Diary: Johnny Depp Biggest Very-Wide-Release Box-Office Flop?

Currently with $10.63 million at the North American box office, The Rum Diary has the dubious distinction of possibly ending up as the biggest Johnny Depp flop in "very wide" release — movies screened at more than 2,000 locations. Among 38 Johnny Depp titles found on Box Office Mojo's inflation-adjusted list, The Rum Diary ranks no. 31. With luck, The Rum Diary will ultimately settle somewhere between What's Eating Gilbert Grape?, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Astronaut's Wife, and Cry-Baby. With inflation-adjusted box-office totals ranging between $15m-$19m, those are all releases from the 1990s — before Depp became a worldwide box-office superstar as a result of Gore Verbinski's international blockbuster Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl in 2003. In case The Rum Diary manages to outgross The Astronaut's Wife, it'll be Depp's second-lowest-grossing movie in "very wide" release. In order to achieve that feat, The Rum Diary will have
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Johnny Depp Working On Adaptation Of J.P. Donleavy's 'The Ginger Man'

Johnny Depp Working On Adaptation Of J.P. Donleavy's 'The Ginger Man'
Also Wants To Adapt Tom Robbins' 'Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates' We miss Johnny Depp. Let us clarify that point. We miss the Johnny Depp of "What's Eating Gilbert Grape?," "Arizona Dream," "Dead Man" and "Donnie Brasco." We miss the young actor who took chances with ambitious directors and material. And while his early work with Tim Burton in films like "Edward Scissorhands" and "Ed Wood" was great, the actor has settled into a comfortable rut, collecting millions upon millions of dollars in tentpole land. And when he's not working with Burton on whatever his next watered down mess…
See full article at The Playlist »

Gael Garcia Bernal & Benicio del Toro Now Up for 'Pancho Villa' Film

At the end of 2009, we heard that Johnny Depp might be re-teaming with his Arizona Dream director Emir Kusturica for the long-titled film Seven Friends of Pancho Villa and the Woman With Six Fingers. an adaptation of James Carlos Blake's novel The Friends of Pancho Villa. However Blic Online (via Bleeding Cool) reports that Depp is no longer involved with the project, and Gael Garcia Bernal (The Motorcycle Diaries) and Benicio del Toro (The Wolfman) are the frontrunners to play the titular revolutionary. The director will apparently meet with both actors in Cuba very soon and make his decision after that. Read on! The story will focus on how Villa, an early 20th-century bandit who became a guerilla fighter and a hero to the poor, and his ragtag team of bandits had a great time fighting and robbing the rich, but also dancing, partying and making love. ...
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Johnny Depp Drops Out of Seven Friends Of Pancho Villa; Gael Garcia Bernal and Benicio Del Toro Circling Lead Role

  • Collider.com
In December 2009, we reported that Johnny Depp was in talks to star in Emir Kusturica's biopic Seven Friends of Pancho Villa and the Woman with Six Fingers.  Depp (who previously worked with Kusturica on 1992's Arizona Dream) was to play Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa with Salma Hayek attached to co-star.  However, Blic Online [via Bleeding Cool] is reporting that Depp has dropped out of the project due to scheduling conflicts, and now Gael Garcia Bernal and Benicio Del Toro are circling the role of Villa.  Oddly, both men have played the revolutionary Che Guevara before (Bernal in The Motorcycle Diaries and Del Toro in Che) and may costar in Martin Scorsese's Silence.  Blic reports that Kusturica will meet with both actors in Cuba and then make his decision. Hit the jump for a brief refresher on Bernal and Del Toro's other potential projects. In addition to possibly co-starring in Silence, Bernal
See full article at Collider.com »

Johny Depp Exits, Two Che Guevara’s Battling To Play Pancho Villa!

With Johnny Depp almost completely giving up his once considerable character acting chops these days – being happy and content enough to spend his days as a paycheck/blockbuster actor – his attachment to play Mexican Revolutionist Pancho Villa in an obscure, Spanish-language performance piece, always looked vulnerable for the chop. And so it is with little surprise that news has filtered through from a Serbian site (via Bleeding Cool) that Depp has dropped the challenging project from his schedule and is no longer attached.

Thankfully, even without his former star, director Emir Kusturica (who worked with Depp way back in 1993 with Arizona Dream) still intends to make the film and there’s interest from two of Depp’s more interesting peers who are now circling the project, namely Benicio Del Toro and Gael Garica Bernal – both of whom have memorably played another revolutionist on film, Che Guevara!

Director Kusturica is to
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Venice Film Festival Decides on 'Essential Killing'

  • IFTN
Director, Jerzy Skolimowski (Moonlighting) will see his latest feature, 'Essential Killing' compete at this year's 67th Venice Film Festival for the event's prestigious Golden Lion. 'Essential Killing', which is co-produced by Ireland's Element Pictures, will have its world premiere screening at the 67th Venice International Film Festival, which takes place from September 1st-11th 2010. The film [previously titled Essence of Killing] is produced and directed by veteran Polish director Jerzy Skolimowski and stars Vincent Gallo (Arizona Dream) and Emmanuelle Seigner (La Vie en Rose).
See full article at IFTN »

[DVD Review] Arizona Dream

Arizona Dream is a film of details, rather than one of plot and character. Though the scenes do connect in a loose way, and the same couple of people are regularly featured in them, they could barely be said to form any aesthetic worldview when placed in conjunction with each other. Rather, that task falls to shot composition, lighting, and frequent shots of flying fish. Whether or not you will respond to this film’s vision of absurdist comedy without a single guffaw, or love it in the way it seems to outright demand to be loved really depends on just far out there you’re willing to go, or how amused you are by the sheer oddness of things (and the odder, the better). I’ll admit that I was unable to fully engage with this film, but I chalk this up to an issue of taste rather than
See full article at JustPressPlay »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites