A Uruguayan rugby team stranded in the snow swept Andes are forced to use desperate measures to survive after a plane crash.

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Writers:

(book), (screenplay)
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Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Antonio 'Tintín' Vizintín (as John Haymes Newton)
David Kriegel ...
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Sam Behrens ...
Javier Methol
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Lilliana Methol
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Bobby François
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Alberto Artuna
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Rafael Cano (as Michael De Lorenzo)
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Fraga, the Mechanic
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Storyline

In 1972, the Uruguayan rugby team is flying to Chile to play a game. However, the plane from the Uruguayan Air Force with 45 people crashes on the Andes Mountains and after the search party, they are considered dead. Two months after the crash, the sixteen survivors are finally rescued. Along the days, the starved survivors decide to eat flesh from the bodies of their comrades to survive. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They were ordinary young men driven to the very limits of human endurance. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for crash scenes too intense for unaccompanied children | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

15 January 1993 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alive: The Miracle of the Andes  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$32,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$36,733,909 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The cross shown in the end credits is not the real cross that stands at the burial place. You can see the real cross on the Wikipedia page for 1972 Andes Flight disaster. The cross and crash site are reachable in the South American summer via horseback. There are guided trips to the site. The cross is surrounded by items visitors have left in honor of the victims and the survivors - as well as parts of the wreckage of the plane. See more »

Goofs

Daniel Fernandez says 8 people died in the avalanche. While this is accurate to the true story, in the film, only 6 people die in the avalanche. Hugo Diaz survives the avalanche in the film and lives to be rescued, even though his real life counterpart, Diego Storm, died in the avalanche. The 8th victim, Juan Menendez, has no counterpart in the film. See more »

Quotes

Nando: Between these mountains somewhere there's a green valley. See these mountains over here? There's no snow on them.
Roberto Canessa: Those mountains must be fifty miles away. You think you can walk fifty miles?
Nando: If we have to, we will.
Roberto Canessa: I can't.
Nando: Yes, you can.
Roberto Canessa: I can't. I'm not as strong as you.
Nando: Do you know what it is that we've lived this long the way we have? Seventy days? That we climbed this mountain. You know what it is? It's impossible. It's impossible and we did it. I'm proud to be a man on a day like this. ...
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Connections

Referenced in Caroline in the City: Caroline and the ATM (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Ave Maria
Composed by Franz Schubert
Arranged by Linda Ronstadt & Aaron Neville
Performed by Aaron Neville
Courtesy of A&M Records, INC.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

The best that could have been done.
20 April 1999 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Critics often fault Alive with petty complaints: Gee, wasn't the avalanche a convenient plot device? Why didn't the plane have signal flares? How come the survivors were all those pretty boys? Why don't we see the dramatic search? In doing so, they're faulting reality: The avalanche really did happen when and how it was portrayed. The wreckage really did lack signal flares. The plane really was chartered by a bunch of ruggedly handsome young men -- what else do you expect from a rugby team? And yes, the search was dramatic (the moment when Roberta Cannessa's father learned that his son is alive is one of those stranger-than-fiction moments), but it was enough of a task to compress the survivors' story into a feature film. The search would have comprised another film entirely on its own.

How do you compress nearly three months of terror and tedium into less than two hours while still holding the attention of the audience? It's a daunting task, and Alive manages quite nicely. With technical consulting provided by crash survivor Nando Parrado, Alive captures the look and mood of the crash site, and sketches in the relationships among the passengers of the ill-fated flight.

It leaves many strange questions hanging (Where, in this plane full of mostly unmarried adults, does Nando come up with two tiny red sneakers?) and those questions are best answered by reading the book. And watch Alive again. Things become clearer with multiple viewings.


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