When a military general inherits a toy making company and begins making war toys, his employees band together to stop him before he ruins the name of Zevo Toys forever.

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Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Gwen Tyler
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Captain Patrick Zevo
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Owen Owens
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Old General Zevo
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Nurse Debbie
Wendy Melvoin ...
Choir Soloist
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Cortez
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Baker
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Shimera
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Guard at Desk
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Storyline

An eccentric toymaker's last wish is that his brother takes over the running of the business. The brother is a military General, and is out of touch with toymaking, and out of touch with reality too. The business should really have been given to Leslie, who was much more like his toymaking father. When the General starts making weapons instead of toys, Leslie decides to take action. Written by Rob Hartill

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Laughter is a state of mind.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some language and sensuality | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

18 December 1992 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Revolta dos Brinquedos  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$43,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$21,452,082 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (FMC Library Print) (dvd release)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The scene where General Zevo is trying to kill a fly with his gun is a reference to a Confucius quote: "Never use a cannon to kill a fly." See more »

Goofs

Leslie says he loves "entomology of words." Entomology is the study of insects, while etymology is the study of words. See more »

Quotes

Leslie Zevo: This doesn't look like vomit.
Asian Researcher: Sorry sir, thats diarrhea.
Leslie Zevo: Send that over to the Poop department.
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Connections

Referenced in Mike & Mike: Episode dated 26 February 2016 (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

THE CLOSING OF THE YEAR / HAPPY WORKERS
Written by Trevor Horn and Hans Zimmer
Performed by The Musical Cast of Toys and Wendy Melvoin (as Wendy) & Lisa Coleman (as Lisa)
Featuring Seal
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User Reviews

 
A surprisingly deep film.
15 December 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Toys is a movie easily overlooked and dismissed as childish and nonsensical. Nothing could be further from the truth though, as it is a movie of surprising depth and style.

The first point that must be covered is the performance given by Robin Williams as Leslie Zevo. Although it is fraught with his almost trademark wackiness there is an underlying current of a man who is on the edge of coming into his own. The layers of the character he plays are subtly shown, as Leslie is a man who is strong, but unsure of his strength and covers that insecurity with comedy and whimsy.

The film is visually striking, a real art department tour de force, and is very much removed from any hint of the past at first glance. Looking deeper into the visuals however reveals the films deeper content of classic surrealist motifs, especially that of dismembered body parts and other parts separated from the whole. Partially assembled dolls, the parts of which come out of machines that are shaped as further separated body parts, are shown throughout. Alsatia lives in rooms within rooms that seem separated from the wholeness of houses, and indeed lives in a paper fold-out doll house herself, the reasons for which become quite apparent by the films end.

This aesthetic choice, combined with the toys vs. weapons juxtaposition makes the films textual purpose clear. Toys is a surrealist reaction to the end of the Cold War, in the very same vein as the original surrealists reactions to the end of the First World War. The film even makes several direct references to one of the surrealist masters, Rene Magrite, especially in the music video sequence. This places Toys in a very deep anti-war tradition, one that is expressed very openly in the entire premise of a General taking control of a toy company and turning it to military purpose.

Any who would dismiss this film as merely childish surely owe it to themselves to take another look at this surrealist masterpiece and lose themselves in the quirky visuals and creative world that is placed on screen.


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