5.6/10
22
1 user 1 critic

Tectonic Plates (1992)

| Drama, Romance
A Canadian woman travels to Italy to commit suicide because the love of her life has vanished without a trace.

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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Michael Benson
Normand Bissonnette
Céline Bonnier
Boyd Clack
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Storyline

Madeleine, an art student studying in Montreal has fallen in love with her professor, Jacques. One day, he disappears, and, fearing that he left because she was undeserving of his love, Madeleine travels to Venice to kill herself. While preparing to commit suicide, she encounters drug addict Constance, who causes Madeleine to re-think her decision. Meanwhile, Jacques has moved to New York City, where he starts cross-dressing, calls himself Jennifer, and becomes a successful counter-culture talk show host. Written by JamesBerardinelli

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Genres:

Drama | Romance

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Also Known As:

Les plaques tectoniques  »

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Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Changing Stages (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
imagery to die for
20 April 2005 | by See all my reviews

While I love this film, I understand why others might not. The most compelling points are all delivered via amazing visual imagery. Even better, there are often multiple meanings interwoven into each sequence. If a viewer is just following the dialog, they miss too much content to care about the action.

Without giving away any of the story, let me give a example. After seeing the film with a friend, I was deeply moved by the anguish of a particular scene, and while raving about how it conveyed such strong emotion for such a feminine issue, my friend commented that he hadn't even noticed what the scene was about.

So, okay, maybe the film is too inaccessible to ever be a big draw, but if you are willing to read between the lines, and can enjoy watching double-entendres in motion, then you owe it to yourself to give this a try.


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