Scent of a Woman
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

8 items from 2017


Netflix Announces 2018 Premiere for New Korean Zombie Series Kingdom

6 March 2017 9:20 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

More living dead adventures are on the horizon for TV viewers, as Netflix has announced a new, eight-episode Korean zombie series called Kingdom that will premiere in 2018.

Press Release: Seoul - March 6, 2017 - Netflix Inc., the world’s leading Internet television network, today announced its second Korean original television series - Kingdom. The eight-episode series, produced by a prominent Korean Drama production company, Astory, is set in Korea’s medieval Joseon period where a crown prince is sent on a suicide mission to investigate a mysterious outbreak that leads him to a brutal truth that threatens the kingdom.

Kingdom breaks new ground by combining two popular genres in one series: historical period drama and zombie action-thriller. The show is a collaboration between two of Korea’s strongest storytellers - director Kim Seong-hun whose latest success Tunnel was a top five movie in the Korean box office last year; and writer »

- Derek Anderson

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Netflix boards Korean zombie series 'Kingdom'

6 March 2017 1:41 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Kim Seong-hun, director of 2016 hit Tunnel, will direct the period zombie action thriller series, scripted by Signal writer Kim Eun-hee.

Netflix is launching Korean period zombie action thriller Kingdom, an original TV series directed by Kim Seong-hun.

Kim’s sophomore feature film Tunnel [pictured], starring Ha Jung-woo, ranked fifth at the local box office last year, after clocking up $49.7m. Kim made his feature directorial debut with thriller A Hard Day, which premiered in Cannes Directors’ Fortnight 2014.

Set in the Joseon dynasty, the eight-episode series follows a crown prince who is sent on a suicide mission to investigate a mysterious outbreak, which turns out to threaten the kingdom.

Kim Eun-hee, writer on the hit series Signal, has been working on the script since 2011. Local TV drama production company Astory, which has credits including Signal, Cinderella’s Stepsister, Lee SoonShin and Scent Of a Woman, is producing.

“I am thrilled about partnering with an eminent writer like Kim Eun-hee. Kingdom »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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9 Oscars Winners Who Don't Hold Up to the Test of Time

24 February 2017 2:05 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Just because a movie or a celebrity wins an Oscar, that doesn't mean the win was deserved. While the Academy Awards are seen as the capstone to awards season -- and one of the highest honors in the business -- we all know that stars and movies get snubbed or overlooked all the time.

What's worse is when we look back at what did win, and shake our heads in confusion and disbelief. So, with the 89th Academy Awards just around the corner, let's take a look back over the show's illustrious history at a few times the Academy voters clearly made a mistake.

Watch: 2017 Oscar Awards Nominees: 'La La Land' Leads With 14 Nominations

1. How Green Was My Valley wins Best Picture at the 14th Academy Awards in 1942

20th Century Fox

Beat Out: Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, Blossoms in the Dust, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, Hold Back the Dawn, The Little Foxes, [link »

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Why Denzel Washington Could Make History with a Surprise Third Oscar Win

23 February 2017 9:12 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

With a best actor nomination for his tour-de-force performance in Fences, Denzel Washington is on the verge of making history — again. 

Should he win, Washington would have more Oscars under his belt than any other African-American actor. He is already the most nominated, having landed his seventh nod this year for Fences, and is also the only African-American to win multiple acting Oscars.

But with Casey Affleck’s gut-wrenching turn in Manchester By the Sea wracking up best actor nominations and wins throughout awards season, this year’s Oscars will see Washington playing an unfamiliar role: the underdog.

He admitted »

- Mike Miller

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Did the 2007 Oscars get it right?

22 February 2017 11:38 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Feb 24, 2017

It’s Oscar weekend! But how well do the Academy Award choices of ten years ago hold up? We’ve taken a look...

The Academy Awards are the highest profile snapshot of what films are highly rated within 12 months of their release. What they can’t predict, however, is how well regarded their choices will age, and only time can tell you that. Which is why I thought it’d be interesting to go back a decade, and see how the winners of the 79th Academy Awards, handed out on February 25th 2007, stack up ten years on…

Best Picture: The Departed

Also nominated:

Babel Letters From Iwo Jima Little Miss Sunshine The Queen

At the time, there was a little bit of acceptance that The Departed was the Scent Of A Woman moment. That just as Al Pacino got rewarded for good work in a film that’s not his finest, »

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My favorite best picture Oscar winner: Unforgiven

21 February 2017 5:28 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Clint Eastwood went back to the genre that made his name and deconstructed its tropes, making it current by incorporating the psychological impact of killing

The best picture race at the 1993 Oscars was one where many sides of 20th century machismo were examined – usually by groups of men shouting really loudly at each other. There was Scent of a Woman, where Al Pacino road tested his mid-90s “maximum volume” approach; Stephen Rea’s howls in the Crying Game; and Jack Nicholson’s bellows of pure testosterone in A Few Good Men. Merchant-Ivory’s rather more subtle Howard’s End featured mostly internal screams brought on by that most vexing of subjects: Edwardian class struggle. The winner, though, was a film in which toxic masculinity oozed out of the screen, delivered with a mix of muttering and barely raised voices.

Related: My favorite best picture Oscar winner: Midnight Cowboy

Continue reading. »

- Lanre Bakare

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Berlinale 2017: Maudie Review

16 February 2017 8:55 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

There’s an indelibly warm and tender tone to Aisling Walsh’s real-life drama Maudie, albeit one spiked with a deep sadness and profundity. Finding a compatible balance between the two, there’s no denying the Irish director’s latest is a moving piece of cinema – it just plays a little safe, as the sort of title you’d be thrilled to stumble across on the telly on a Sunday evening, but not one you’d necessarily need to indulge in on the big screen.

Set in Nova Scotia, we meet Maud (Sally Hawkins), eavesdropping on a conversation between her brother and auntie, as they deliberate over what to do with her. For Maud arthritis and a hunched back, and has been treated like an outsider ever since she can remember. Wanting to keep herself occupied, she responds to an advert to be a housemaid at the humble abode of the introverted, »

- Stefan Pape

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How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

4 January 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: Tiff)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

The story of Toni Erdmann — which has a solid Rotten Tomatoes score of 91% — follows a father who is trying to reconnect with his adult daughter after the death of his dog. It sounds simple enough but, of course, the two couldn’t be more unalike. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016 and where it won the Fipresci Prize. Since then, it »

- Carson Blackwelder

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

8 items from 2017


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