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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 180 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


50 Free Screenplays You Can Download Right Now, From ‘Eternal Sunshine’ to ‘Lost in Translation’

2 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Looking for a good read this fall? Skip a book and try a screenplay instead. Script Reader Pro has put together an incredible collection of 50 screenplays you can download right now for free. The database is categorized into five genres — drama, comedy, thriller, horror, and action/adventure — and includes 10 films per genre. Scripts featured include classics like “Alien” and “Reservoir Dogs” and contemporary favorites like “It Follows,” “Nightcrawler,” and “Bridesmaids.”

Read More: 2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay

For aspiring screenwriters, the collection provides a masterclass in learning the ins and outs of writing for the big screen from masters such as Charlie Kaufman, Sofia Coppola, Alexander Payne, Quentin Tarantino, and more. Oscar-winning screenplays for “Lost in Translation,” “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “Good Will Hunting,” and “No Country for Old Men” are also available.

Click here to visit Script Reader Pro, where you can download all the screenplays for free. »

- Zack Sharf

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Jason Isaacs interview: The Death Of Stalin

18 October 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Oct 19, 2017

We said hello to Jason Isaacs, before chatting about The Death Of Stalin and Star Trek: Discovery...

Jason Isaacs has been on our screens a lot of late. The former Lucius Malfoy actor is currently gracing online streaming services around the globe as Captain Lorca in Star Trek: Discovery, and his hilarious turn as General Zhukov in The Death Of Stalin will be lighting up a cinema near you very soon.

See related  The Punisher: what can we expect from a solo Netflix series? Daredevil season 2: examining Jon Bernthal's Punisher

As part of his promotional tour for the aforementioned Russian romp – which has satirical mastermind Armando Iannucci (Alan Partridge, The Thick Of It, Veep) at its helm – Isaacs sat with us for twenty minutes in a swanky London hotel to have a ruddy good chat.

As I shuffled in and sat down, Isaacs explained »

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Critic's Notebook: 'Candyman' Still a Superior Slasher Movie at 25

15 October 2017 12:28 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

It was a year of scandals, protests and explosive racial tensions. In 1992, riots rocked Los Angeles in the aftermath of the Rodney King trial verdict, the U.S. sent military forces into war-torn Somalia, Mike Tyson was jailed on rape charges, and Bill Clinton was elected to the White House. In cinema this was the year of Basic Instinct, Malcolm X, The Bodyguard, Batman Returns, Bram Stoker’s Dracula — plus a little word-of-mouth hit by a young unknown director: Reservoir Dogs.

But the 1992 release that left a deeper impression on me than any of those listed above was Candyman. A superior »

- Stephen Dalton

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Quentin Tarantino Breaks Silence on Harvey Weinstein: ‘I’ve Been Stunned and Heartbroken’

13 October 2017 5:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Quentin Tarantino has finally made an official statement reacting to the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal. Weinstein has been accused of harassment and abuse by dozens of women over the last week, including actresses Gwyneth PaltrowLéa Seydoux, Cara Delevingne, and Kate Beckinsale, and his longtime collaborator Tarantino has remained quiet on the allegations until now.

Amber Tamblyn released Tarantino’s statement on her Twitter page at the director’s request. “For the last week, I’ve been stunned and heartbroken about the revelations that have come to light about my friend for 25 years Harvey Weinstein,” Tarantino said. “I need a few more days to process my pain, emotions, anger and memory and then I will speak publicly about it.”

Read More:Rose McGowan on Twitter: ‘Harvey Weinstein Raped Me

Few producer-director relationships have been as powerful in the industry as Weinstein and Tarantino. The former studio head launched the »

- Zack Sharf

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Pam Grier, the Foxy Siren of Blaxploitation, to be Honored at This Year’s St. Louis International Film Festival!

11 October 2017 5:08 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The one and only Pam Grier will be honored by Cinema St. Louis with a ‘Women in Film Award’ when she’s in town for this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. Pam’s iconic movie career began when she moved to Los Angeles in the late ‘60s from her native North Carolina at age 18. After a tiny role in Russ Meyer’s Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls (1970), she landed a job as a receptionist for American International Pictures where she was discovered by Jack Hill, an Aip director who cast her in a pair of women’s prison films: The Big Doll House (1971) and The Big Bird Cage (1972). Soon she was known as the “Queen of Blaxploitation” at a time when film roles for African-American women were, as Grier puts it, “practically invisible, or painfully stereotypical”.

Sliff, which runs  Nov. 2nd-12th will kick off with »

- Tom Stockman

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Rushes. Anne Wiazemsky, Harvey Weinstein, Alan Rudolph, "Reservoir Dogs" at 25

11 October 2017 11:47 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSThe luminously thoughtful French actress Anne Wiazemsky, indelible for her starring roles in Robert Bresson's Au hasard Balthazar, Jean-Luc Godard's Le chinoise, Pier Paolo Pasolini's Teorema and Porcile, and Philippe Garrel's L'enfant secret, has died at the age of 70. Part of her memoir Un an après has been adapted in the controversial film Redoubtable, which premiered at Cannes this year.Significant writings concerning Miramax and The Weinstein Company co-founder Harvey Weinstein's sexual abuse are appearing far and wide: Ronan Farrow for The New Yorker, Jodi Kantor & Rachel Abrams for The New York Times, Heather Graham for Variety, and Naveen Kumar for Vice. Recommended VIEWINGUploaded five months ago and undiscovered until now: Neil Bahadur has found the first trailer for Alan Rudolph's first film in 15 years, Ray Meets Helen. »

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Harvey Weinstein Accusations: How Film Festival Environments Provided a Backdrop For Sexual Assault

11 October 2017 8:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In 1995, Harvey Weinstein tried to give Mira Sorvino a massage, chasing her around the room when she rebuffed him. In 1996, he sexually assaulted rising French actress Judith Godrèche in a hotel room; a year later, he had another incident with Rose McGowan. In 2008, actress Louisette Geiss fled a hotel room where Weinstein tried to get her to watch him masturbate. In 2010, he tricked another French actress, Emma de Caunes, into visiting a hotel room where he exposed himself and tried to get her lie down. 

In all of these accounts, Weinstein seemed to think that the relative privacy of the hotel room provided him with a sanctuary in which he could perform deplorable acts on whomever he pleased, but the context was more specific than that: In every instance, he was at a film festival. 

Read More:Harvey Weinstein Is Done: After 30 Years of Abusive Behavior, the Mogul Lies in »

- Eric Kohn

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Breathe is the Theory Of Everything that 2017 never asked for

10 October 2017 9:35 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Certain movies are so pervasively influential that filmmakers citing them as an inspiration are immediately suspect. Who can really trust, for example, any new director who fancies himself (or herself, but come on: himself) the author of the next Reservoir Dogs, Harold And Maude, or Full Metal Jacket? But Andy Serkis,…

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- Jesse Hassenger

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[Los Angeles] Special ‘The Lost Tree’ Party at the Chinese Theatre

6 October 2017 7:03 AM, PDT | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

Hey, Los Angeles, next Monday, October 9th, Moviedude is hosting a special screening of The Lost Tree at the famous Chinese Theatre. The film is a horror-thriller starring Thomas Nicholas, Michael Madsen (Reservoir Dogs, Kill Bill: Vol. 1, Kill Bill: Vol. 2), Lacey Chabert (Black Christmas, Mean Girls, “Part of Five”), Scott Grimes (Robin Hood, […] »

- Brad Miska

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Critic's Notebook: 'Glengarry Glen Ross' at 25

2 October 2017 5:15 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The year 1992 was hardly short on man-centric pictures: Testosterone-hungry moviegoers got the practically all-male crime flicks Reservoir Dogs and Trespass, as well as Unforgiven's rumination on the dark side of manly Western archetypes. Even Rob Reiner and Aaron Sorkin rounded up a few good men. But what other film came close to the collection of male thesps at the top of their game assembled in Glengarry Glen Ross?

Apart from a mute waitress or coat-check girl on the edges of the frame, there are no women here. And women might rightly be glad to escape a world this desperate and »

- John DeFore

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Thomas the Tank Engine Was Pretty Dark and Twisted for a Children’s Show — Watch

1 October 2017 12:19 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Not unlike nursery rhymes and fairy tales, cartoons are sometimes revealed to have been quite dark in hindsight. “Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends” is the latest children’s program to be so reassessed, most recently in an extensive New Yorker essay about the show’s “repressive, authoritarian soul.” Its arguments are quite convincing.

Read More:‘The Leisure Seeker’ Trailer: Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland Go for One Last Ride — Watch

Case in point: “The Sad Story of Henry,” a segment from the show in which a train named Henry refuses to do his job and receives a cruel, lifelong punishment. “We shall take away your rails, and leave you here for always and always,” the conductor tells Henry. He’s then imprisoned behind bricks for the rest of his (un)natural life, and the vignette ends with the narrator musing, “I think he deserved his punishment, don’t you? »

- Michael Nordine

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Thomas the Tank Engine Was Pretty Dark and Twisted for a Children’s Show — Watch

1 October 2017 12:19 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Not unlike nursery rhymes and fairy tales, cartoons are sometimes revealed to have been quite dark in hindsight. “Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends” is the latest children’s program to be so reassessed, most recently in an extensive New Yorker essay about the show’s “repressive, authoritarian soul.” Its arguments are quite convincing.

Read More:‘The Leisure Seeker’ Trailer: Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland Go for One Last Ride — Watch

Case in point: “The Sad Story of Henry,” a segment from the show in which a train named Henry refuses to do his job and receives a cruel, lifelong punishment. “We shall take away your rails, and leave you here for always and always,” the conductor tells Henry. He’s then imprisoned behind bricks for the rest of his (un)natural life, and the vignette ends with the narrator musing, “I think he deserved his punishment, don’t you? »

- Michael Nordine

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Tim Roth Got Drunk with Quentin Tarantino, and That’s Why He’s in ‘Reservoir Dogs’ — Watch

1 October 2017 10:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Tim Roth has collaborated with Quentin Tarantino for as long as Tarantino’s been making movies, but that very nearly wasn’t the case. The star of “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp Fiction,” and “The Hateful Eight” explains on “Entertainment Weekly: The Show” that he initially refused to audition because he’s “crap” at reading for roles. How did they solve this problem? By getting drunk.

Read More:Quentin Tarantino Reveals His Most Important Storytelling Tip — Exclusive Video

“Within 20 pages, I was going, ‘Oh, I want to be in this,’” Roth says of his first impression of the screenplay. “It’s so beautifully written. It’s so keenly and intelligently written, and it’s also very funny.” However, after meeting with Tarantino and Harvey Keitel, who starred in and co-produced “Reservoir Dogs,” Roth still wasn’t into the idea of auditioning.

Read More:Quentin Tarantino Kicks Off Sundance’s Next Fest With »

- Michael Nordine

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How Quentin Tarantino Convinced Tim Roth To Audition For Reservoir Dogs

30 September 2017 8:37 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Tim Roth recently revealed that he was initially hesitant to sign on as Mr. Orange in Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, but the director had a plan to get him to sign on for the role. »

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Tim Roth on 'Tin Star,' Tarantino and Tupac

29 September 2017 1:51 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Skinheads, hit men, cops, criminals, cops-posing-as-criminals, princes, junkies, executioners, politicians, supervillains, an 18th-century fop, a 19th-century impressionist painter and a 21st-century psychotic chimp – you name it, and there's an extremely good chance that Tim Roth has played it. The 56-year-old British actor has the sort of varied, overstuffed resumé that suggests a reserved spot in the steadily-working-character-actor canon, and has not one but two projects hitting TV screens at the moment: Tin Star, an Amazon thriller that about an expat cop living in Canada that starts as a quirky fish-out-of-water »

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Let The Corpses Tan Review [Fantastic Fest 2017]

27 September 2017 4:50 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

In the argument of “style over substance,” movies like Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s Let The Corpses Tan make a case for limitless artistic boundaries. In every sense, this is a Giallo-fied Spaghetti Western stand-off that feeds off ambition. Like a six-shooter filled with posh glitter, liquified gold, graphic gore and creative architecture unlike anything mainstream cinema will back. There’s a narrative, but it’s flimsy and underdeveloped with full intent – all focus is on the exploration of cinematic techniques. Cattet and Forzani never care if you even know a character’s name, as they’re only interested in how their craniums will splatter when popped by a steel-manufactured projectile.

Yet, nonetheless, there is indeed a story at play – criminals who hide out with a vacationing family, and the two cops who spark a can-go-wrong, will-go-wrong exchange. Rhino (Stephane Ferrara) fights for his gang’s stolen gold, Luce (Elina Löwensohn) stirs the pot, »

- Matt Donato

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F*Bombs - Clerks (Video)

25 September 2017 8:41 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Ever wonder how many F-Bombs are dropped in some of your favorite movies like Pulp Fiction, Superbad, The Devil's RejectsThe Big Lebowski and Reservoir Dogs? Well, JoBlo's got you covered with F*Bombs. Here we count each and every use of the word f*ck in select classic flicks. On this newest episode, we take on Kevin Smith's slacker classic Clerks, starring Brian... Read More »

- Mike Sprague

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Flickering Myth Film Class: How To Do An Ensemble Film

20 September 2017 7:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

In the latest instalment of Flickering Myth’s film class, Tom Jolliffe looks at how to pull off an ensemble film…

The art in pulling off the ensemble film. It’s a tricking balance. In the vast majority of cinema you may be limited to one or two clearly defined protagonists with a cast of supporting artists. On occasions though, a writer wants to create an ensemble piece. It may have one particular character who dominates the screen a little more than the others, but you could have four or more characters who share screen near equally.

How do you do it right? Well firstly, whether you have four characters, six, ten, or whatever, the most important element is to have clearly definable characters. You could call them archetypes certainly, but it is important to ensure that ‘character one’ is different from the rest. If you craft one character who »

- Tom Jolliffe

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Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs Screening This Saturday Night at Webster University

11 September 2017 5:24 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Now listen up, Mr. Pink. There’s two ways we can do this job. My way… or the highway!”

Reservoir Dogs will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium Saturday September 16th at 7:30pm

Quentin Tarantino’s feature-length directorial debut, Reservoir Dogs (1992) depicts the events before and after a botched diamond heist. The film features Harvey Keitel (Mr. White), Michael Madsen (Mr. Blonde), Steve Buscemi (Mr. Pink), Chris Penn (Nice Guy Eddie Cabot), Lawrence Tierney (Joe Cabot), Tim Roth (Mr. Orange), and Tarantino (Mr. Brown). Tarantino displays many themes that have become his style and influenced a generation of filmmakers: choreographed violent crime, pop culture references, nonlinear storytelling, dialogue punctuated with profanity.

Somewhere along the way, opinions on Quentin Tarantino have become divided – some still loving his work, others calling it bloated and unnecessarily inflated. However, those are two criticisms that cannot be levelled at his first film. It »

- Tom Stockman

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Saban Films Acquires Us Distribution Rights to Remake of George A. Romero’s Day Of The Dead

11 September 2017 11:24 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Featuring arguably the most beloved zombie ever put to film, George A. Romero's Day of the Dead is a seminal standout in the horror genre that has grown a diehard fanbase in the thirty-plus years since its release. New takes on Romero's groundbreaking 1985 film were featured in 2005's Day of the Dead 2: Contagium and 2008's Day of the Dead, and now Saban Films has acquired the Us rights to Millennium Media's new Day of the Dead reimagining, with a release expected late this year:

Press Release: Toronto – September 9, 2017 – Saban Films has acquired the U.S. distribution rights to a slate of films from Avi Lerner’s Millennium Media. The trio of titles includes Isaac Florentine’s Acts of Vengeance starring Antonio Banderas, Karl Urban, Robert Forster and Paz Vega; Paul Solet’s Bullet Head (formerly Unchained) also starring Banderas, John Malkovich and Adrien Brody; and Day of the Dead »

- Derek Anderson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 180 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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