The Last of the Mohicans
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001

14 items from 2017


Michael Mann to direct a Vietnam War TV series

7 July 2017 12:15 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Rob Leane Jul 7, 2017

Michael Mann will return to TV for Hue 1968, a Vietnam War drama on FX....

Michael Mann is heading back to TV. Way back in his early days as a writer/producer, he worked on episodes of Starsky And Hutch and Miami Vice. Of course, he went on direct massive movies such as Heat, The Last Of The Mohicans, Ali and Collateral

See related  Preacher renewed for longer second season Preacher episode 10 review: Call And Response

And now, with the golden age of 'peak TV' continuing, FX has snapped up Mann to helm a new war drama. The show will adapt Hue 1968, Mark Bowden's bestseller, all about American involvement in the conflict. (You might recognise Bowden's name - he also wrote the book that became Black Hawk Down.)

Mann will direct multiple episodes, including the first one. There are expected to be 8-10 episodes in total, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Why Daniel Day-Lewis' Retirement Is a Major Loss to the Movies

21 June 2017 6:20 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Daniel Day-Lewis has earned many accolades and awards over the last 35 years, but perhaps no one has more perfectly encapsulated this actor's appeal than comedian Paul F. Tompkins. Cast in a tiny part in 2007's There Will Be Blood opposite Day-Lewis, the stand-up comic later related what their first on-set encounter was like. "Now, I had been told that Daniel Day-Lewis was kind of an intense person," Tompkins says. "And he's really not. He's really … The Most Intense Person that has ever lived on Earth. He's not doing anything – he's »

Permalink | Report a problem


Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most

20 June 2017 2:59 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Daniel Day-Lewis dropped a bombshell on fans of his work worldwide when he announced that he would be retiring from acting, just a few months before the release of his purported last role, in Paul Thomas-Anderson’s upcoming “Phantom Thread.” One of the world’s most coveted actors has a surprisingly nimble filmography. Even as it stretches back to the early eighties, Day-Lewis didn’t become a big name until his breakout role in Stephen Frears’ 1985 “My Beautiful Laundrette,” followed by a series of acclaimed roles in “A Room With a View,” “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and “My Left Foot,” which won him the first of three Academy Awards. The other Oscars arrived for back-to-back roles in “There Will Be Blood” and “Lincoln,” leaving no doubt that the versatile performer was still at the top of his game.

See MoreDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From Acting

But these highlights are only a few of the astonishing achievements in the actor’s robust output. Here are the ones we’ll treasure for all time, while holding out hope that this legendary talent’s final performance will land a spot as well.

A Room With a View

It was one of his very last supporting roles, but Daniel Day-Lewis was the embodiment of Cecil Vyse in Merchant Ivory’s 1986 adaptation of E.M. Forster’s “A Room With a View.” In lesser hands, Lucy Honeychurch’s jilted suitor might have been little more than a prissy sad sack; Day-Lewis invested the character with empathy, as if Cecil knew his reach exceeded his grasp. While Lucy may have viewed their match as a prison narrowly escaped, Day-Lewis’ performance suggested a man who couldn’t get beyond his own pince-nez, but loved her so much that he let her go. —Dana Harris

The Age of Innocence” The emotions in Day-Lewis’s character are often big and ever present. But the performances that best showcase his talent are when he plays a more genteel character – his manner poised, cadence deliberate, body at rest. Yet in playing Newland Archer in Edith Wharton’s rigid 19th Century high society, he is effortless in accessing the desperate yearning that lies beneath his impossibly calm demeanor. His ability to translate complex thoughts, burning emotions and his character’s interior life through a completely placid surface is a marvel. —Chris O’Falt “Gangs of New York

There’s a titanic force lurking under each of Day-Lewis’ roles, but nowhere was that energy unleashed better than in Martin Scorsese’s 2002 city-spanning epic “Gangs of New York.” Bill the Butcher combined the actor’s ferocity with an unbridled villainous streak, an antagonist as evil as he is charming. Day-Lewis has always excelled in quiet roles, but Bill is a reminder that his flair for the theatrical is rarely equalled. Watching Bill play to an audience inside a rowdy theater or to a gathered crowd of terrified citizens, there’s a twisted thrill in seeing a true performer playing a true performer.  —Steve Greene

The Last of the Mohicans” Arguably the actor’s most dreamy, overtly romantic role, Day-Lewis’ turn in Michael Mann’s 1992 historical action-adventure is both totally swoon-worthy and emotionally satisfying. As the adopted son of the eponymous last of the Mohican tribe, Day-Lewis plays his Hawkeye as a hero in the most classic sense, but aided by the actor’s formidable chops, the role (and the film) take on added dimension and complexity. Mann’s film is a heart-pounding adventure that doesn’t skimp on the tough stuff (people are scalped and burnt alive and commit suicide in order to escape worse fates, and that’s just the wide strokes), and it’s grounded by Day-Lewis’ trademark dedication and sincerity to the essential beats of his characters. Slipping easily between breakneck adventure (few movies contain so many scenes of artful running through the woods as “Mohicans”) and dreamy leading man (his chemistry with Madeleine Stowe all but aches right off the screen), turning in one of his more overlooked performances in a long line of lauded roles. It’s a film, and a part, that satisfies even more than two decades later. —Kate Erbland “Lincoln”

Day-Lewis won this third Best Actor Oscar — more than any actor in history — for playing the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” because the movie is unimaginable without him. It took years for Spielberg to convince the recalcitrant Brit to play the American icon. Always willing to wait years between cherry-picked roles, replenishing his batteries by reengaging with the world, Day-Lewis finally broke down after Tony Kushner’s sprawling script focused on January 1865, when Lincoln maneuvered Congress into passing the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which ended slavery in America. “The important thing is they got Lincoln,” Lincoln biographer Doris Kearns Goodwin told me at the L.A. premiere, “his stooped walk, his high-pitched voice, his humor.”

Day-Lewis is a draw for moviegoers because when the match is perfect between director and role, when it feels right, he gives his all. He embraces a role so totally that it consumes and overtakes him. He loses himself in the part throughout production. As usual, Day-Lewis’s preparation was intense. He worked in seclusion until he sent Spielberg tape recorder audio of his approximation of the 16h president’s reedy tenor. He nailed his first scene on-set, an eight-minute speech about the Emancipation Proclamation, on the first take with no on-set rehearsal. Day-Lewis stayed in character throughout the shoot, addressed by all as “Mr. President.” No socializing on set saves energy, Day-Lewis has said. It’s fair to say that Day-Lewis is Abraham Lincoln, and the people went to see it because the actor was in it. —Anne Thompson

My Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown

Jim Sheridan’s period drama revolves about Christy Brown, the cerebral palsy-stricken painter who struggles to engage with the family around him until he discovers the one vocation he can control with his foot. However, that summary barely gets to the essence of the movie’s emotional core. It’s a naturally engaging story about perseverance against daunting physical challenges, made all the more heartbreaking by the intolerant times in which it takes place — but it would be nothing without the young Day-Lewis in the lead role, one that few actors could tackle without risking accusations of parody. Instead, he turns Brown into a vibrating, energetic creative figure battling to express his emotions and overcome the pity that surrounds him at every turn. It’s at once heartbreaking and hopeful, a testament to perseverance in which the performance embodies the themes to its core. Day-Lewis won his first Oscar for the role, and even as he continued to tackle new challenges, he already confirmed his mastery at this early stage. —Eric Kohn

My Beautiful Laundrette

From the start of his career Day-Lewis showed a penchant for muscular, angry and violent roles, starting with Stephen Frears’s searing 16 mm portrait of Margaret Thatcher’s London, “My Beautiful Laundrette,” which jumped from TV movie to arthouse phenomenon at the Edinburgh Film Festival. “I spent most of my time on the front line of London street life,” Day-Lewis said at the 2013 Santa Barbara Film Festival, “playing soccer, fighting on the school playground, and rebelling against authority and the British class system.” A controversial early exploration of sex, race and class, “My Beautiful Launderette” broke out Lewis, director Frears, rookie screenwriter Hanif Kureishi (who earned an Oscar nomination) and Working Title Films. With swaggering, sexy humor, Day-Lewis played Johnny, the street-tough ex-National Front boyfriend of Omar (Gordon Warnecke), the son of a Pakistani immigrant, who helps his childhood friend to renovate his uncle’s Battersea laundrette. Fears cast Day-Lewis after meeting him and asking him about his South London accent. Frears said: “‘You’re the son of a poet laureate, why are you speaking like that?’ He said he’d been to a comprehensive and had adopted it as a defence. Then he wrote me a letter saying he’d kill me if he wasn’t cast.” No one knew “My Beautiful Laundrette” would become an iconic film about the 1980s. —Anne Thompson

The Unbearable Lightness of Being” Day-Lewis was a perfect if unexpected choice to play Tomas, the detached lover at the center of this erotically charged adaptation of Czech novelist Milan Kundera’s most famous work. Disciplined in his practice surrounding sex and romantic attachments, Tomas bounces between Sabina (Lena Olin) and Tereza (Juliette Binoche) as both ravenous lover and aloof philosopher. Day-Lewis brings a perfect blend of lithe sexuality and mystery to Tomas, light on his feet and heavy in the head. He famously learned Czech for the part (a notoriously difficult language), and as a result his accent is spot on. What else would you expect from the man who made “method acting” a household term? —Jude Dry “There Will Be Blood

His voice lowered to a rumbling baritone beneath a scruffy mustache, Daniel Plainview becomes an extraordinary figure of capitalist intensity within a matter of minutes.  Paul Thomas-Anderson’s most audacious filmmaking feat was matched by Day-Lewis’ remarkable transformation into the scheming, relentless oil miner and the empire he cobbles together in the heat. From the virtuosic intensity of his early management of a drilling company to the psychotic extremes of his final stage, Plainview is emblematic of the darkness lurking at the center of the American dream — which is why it’s all the more extraordinary that he’s played by an Englishman.

But of course, he’s not just an Englishman, he’s Daniel Day-Lewis, an actor so capable of transforming himself that in “There Will Be Blood” he seems to be reborn before our very eyes. Hovering on the edge of camp, he manages to take a line that on paper sounds patently ridiculous — you know, something about drinking someone else’s milkshake — and turn it into an iconic moment in film history, one loaded with the rage of boundless American greed. He was a lock for Best Actor the moment the cameras stopped rolling.

Related storiesDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From ActingIsabelle Huppert, Mariachi and a History Lesson: Cannes Celebrates Its 70th Year With a Lively NightMark Boal and Annapurna Pictures Are Getting Into the Documentary Business »

- Eric Kohn, Dana Harris, Kate Erbland, Steve Greene and Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Daniel Day-Lewis Announces Retirement From Acting, Final Film 'Phantom Thread' to Premiere This Christmas

20 June 2017 2:31 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Sad day for fans of brilliant performances.

Daniel Day-Lewis has retired from acting, the Oscar-winner's rep confirmed to Et on Tuesday.

"Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years," the statement reads. "This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject."

Watch: Meet Gabriel-Kane, Daniel Day-Lewis' Hot and Talented 20-Year-Old Son

The 60-year-old actor's final performance, Phantom Thread -- which reunites Day-Lewis with There Will Be Blood director Paul Thomas Anderson -- is set to hit theaters this Christmas.

Known for his dedicated method style of preparation, Day-Lewis has been known to "disappear into a role," leading to a slew brilliant performances in a number of acclaimed films such as There Will Be Blood, Gangs of New York, The Last of the Mohicans, and more recently »

Permalink | Report a problem


Daniel Day-Lewis to quit acting

20 June 2017 2:19 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Three-time Oscar-winner’s last film will be Phantom Thread.

Daniel Day-Lewis, regarded in some quarters as the greatest film actor of his generation if not of all time, is to quit acting, his spokesperson said in a statement released on Tuesday.

The statement read: “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject.”

The three-time Oscar winner is working on what now appears to be his final film, Paul Thomas Anderson’s London haute couture drama Phantom Thread, which is scheduled to open on December 25 through Focus Features. Universal handles international distribution and Annapurna Pictures is producing the project, now in post.

The development immediately transforms Day-Lewis’ reunion with Anderson following his Oscar-winning turn in There Will Be Blood into an even »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

Permalink | Report a problem


Poll: What’s Daniel Day-Lewis’ Best Film?

20 June 2017 1:23 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Daniel Day-Lewis is leaving behind an impressive filmography in the wake of the news that he’s retiring from acting.

The actor earned three best actor Oscars through his career — for “Lincoln,” “There Will Be Blood,” and “My Left Foot” — and earned nominations for two others — “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.” Other major films include the adventure epic “The Last of the Mohicans,” musical “Nine,” and period drama “The Age of Innocence.”

The 60-year-old star is known throughout the industry as being a master of method acting. He famously confined himself to a wheelchair for his portrayal of Christy Brown in “My Left Foot.” He also committed to learning Czech for his role in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being.”

Related

Daniel Day-Lewis’ Film Career in Photos

Day-Lewis has played everything from artists and warriors, to presidents and gang leaders in his illustrious — albeit selective — career, »

- Jacob Bryant

Permalink | Report a problem


Daniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From Acting

20 June 2017 12:43 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Three-time best actor winner Daniel Day-Lewis is retiring from acting, Variety reports. The 60-year-old star will appear in just one more film, Paul Thomas Anderson’s upcoming drama “Phantom Thread.” The film is set in the world of high fashion and hits theaters on December 25, 2017. Day-Lewis earned his second Oscar for best picture for Anderson’s 2008 film “There Will Be Blood.” His other two best actor wins were for Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” in 2013 and 1989’s “My Left Foot.”

Read More: Daniel Day-Lewis and Michael Fassbender: Why They Hold the Highest Metacritic Actor Scores

Day-Lewis has not given a reason for his retirement, his spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, told Variety. “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor,” Dart said in a statement. “He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his »

- Graham Winfrey

Permalink | Report a problem


Shocker! Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting (Exclusive)

20 June 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis, widely considered one of the preeminent actors of his generation, is retiring from acting, Variety has learned.

The 60-year-old star, who has played presidents, writers, and gang leaders in a career that has spanned four decades, has one final film awaiting release, an untitled drama set in the world of high fashion. It is scheduled to hit theaters on December 25, 2017 and reunites him with Paul Thomas Anderson, who directed Day-Lewis to a best actor Oscar in 2007’s “There Will Be Blood.” Day-Lewis intends to help promote the movie, according to a person familiar with his plans.

He did not give a reason for his retirement. In a statement, Day-Lewis’ spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, confirmed the news: “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor. He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years. This is a private decision and neither he nor his representatives will make any further comment on this subject. ”

Related

Daniel Day-Lewis: His 12 Best Films

Day-Lewis is the only performer to ever win three best actor Oscars. He was honored for the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” for his turn as a rapacious oil man in “There Will Be Blood,” and for his performance as writer and artist Christy Brown in “My Left Foot.” He earned two other Academy Award nominations for “Gangs of New York” and “In the Name of the Father.”

Day-Lewis has been praised for his shape-shifting acting and versatility. He is known for going to extreme lengths for his performances, frequently remaining in character off-screen. He has also starred in musicals (“Nine”), adventure epics (“The Last of the Mohicans“), and period dramas (“The Age of Innocence”).

The method master once learned Czech to play a philandering doctor in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” listened to Eminem records to channel rage in “Gangs of New York,” and confined himself to a wheelchair for “My Left Foot” to play Brown, who had cerebral palsy.

Day-Lewis, who is the son of poet Cecil Day-Lewis and English actress Jill Balcon, made his screen debut at the age of 14 in a bit part in 1971’s “Sunday, Bloody Sunday.” He first gained attention on the stage and on television before dazzling critics in 1985 with the one-two punch of “My Beautiful Laundrette” and “A Room With a View,” convincingly playing a street tough and an upper class Edwardian.

Although he has remained in high demand, Day-Lewis is also known as being extremely selective, often waiting years between projects. In the late ’90s and early aughts he appeared to give up acting for a while, reportedly working as a cobbler before Martin Scorsese convinced him to return to the screen for “Gangs of New York.”

Day-Lewis has three children and is married to writer and director Rebecca Miller.

Related storiesPoll: What's Daniel Day-Lewis' Best Film?Haim Debut New Song 'Right Now,' Paul Thomas Anderson-Directed Video -- Not a Moment Too SoonTalent Agent Gene Parseghian Dies at 72 »

- Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Mann Returns To TV With Vietnam War Miniseries ‘Huê 1968’

24 April 2017 9:21 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Today, Michael Mann is predominately associated with the big screen — indeed, few filmmakers make movies quite as big and cinematic as things like “The Last Of The Mohicans,” “Heat,” “Public Enemies” and yes, our beloved “Blackhat” (you’ll learn to like it one day, fools). But the director made his name in TV, initially writing on “Starsky & Hutch” before creating the acclaimed “Police Story,” and helping to shepherd the iconic “Miami Vice” and the less well known, but highly influential “Crime Story.

Continue reading Michael Mann Returns To TV With Vietnam War Miniseries ‘Huê 1968’ at The Playlist. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

Permalink | Report a problem


Outlander Season 3 Teaser Released: Here’s a Deep-Dive Analysis

17 April 2017 5:56 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

“I have lied, killed and broken trust, but when I stand before God I’ll have one thing to say to weigh against all the rest…”

With that one simple but oh-so-passionate line of dialogue, the ongoing Droughtlander became a little less painful Sunday after Starz dropped its first official tease for season 3 of Outlander that was almost immediately leaked online for all those non-subscribers. So much for trying to get folks to tune into the premiere of The White Princess on the west coast! (The network will make it available for social media on Monday morning).

Was the teaser effective? »

- Lynette Rice

Permalink | Report a problem


Definitive Director’s Edition Of Michael Mann’s ‘Heat’ Coming To Blu-ray This Spring

27 March 2017 5:25 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Michael Mann never stops fussing with his movies. Earlier this year, yet another cut of “Ali‘ hit Blu-ray, and this follows “Thief,” “Manhunter,” “The Last Of The Mohicans” and “Blackhat“ all getting new cuts (though the latest version of the latter hasn’t yet hit home video, but it screened last year in New York).

Continue reading Definitive Director’s Edition Of Michael Mann’s ‘Heat’ Coming To Blu-ray This Spring at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


A New Cut of ‘Ali’ Is Now Available on Blu-Ray

18 January 2017 2:00 PM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Michael Mann has gone back and re-edited several of his films, including Manhunter and most recently, Blackhat. Sometimes these changes are substantial, other times they’re redundant. The director believes his last cut of The Last of the Mohicans is the superior film, while most of his fans seem to agree the Director’s Cut of Miami Vice is the inferior version. Now […]

The post A New Cut of ‘Ali’ Is Now Available on Blu-Ray appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Mann’s New Cut Of ‘Ali’ Has Hit Blu-Ray To Little Fanfare

17 January 2017 2:07 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Michael Mann is never quite finished with his movies. “Thief,” “Manhunter,” and “The Last Of The Mohicans” have all been issued in director’s cuts, and last year, Mann overhauled “Blackhat” and presented a significantly changed new edit at Bam Rose Cinemas (there’s still no word on if this version will ever see the light of day on home video or streaming).

Continue reading Michael Mann’s New Cut Of ‘Ali’ Has Hit Blu-Ray To Little Fanfare at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Third Time’s a Charm for Michael Mann’s ‘Ali’ Commemorative Edition Cut

17 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Times change,” director Michael Mann says of what prompted him to revisit his 2001 Muhammad Ali biopic “Ali” for a “commemorative edition” Blu-ray. The new cut hits shelves today, on what would have been Ali’s 75th birthday. “What I was interested in, particularly now, was making more tangible the forces that were raised against him, all his adversaries, and linking them in a strong way.”

A director’s cut of the film was released in 2004, injecting eight-and-a-half minutes of material that both amplified the political strife of the times and deepened Ali’s kinship with sports journalist Howard Cosell, among other things. For the new release, Mann has pulled some of those Cosell elements back while keeping the political material in tact, shaving and trimming elsewhere for the shortest cut yet — though one still clocking in at a robust 151 minutes.

“It’s a combination of expanding certain things and compressing others, »

- Kristopher Tapley

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001

14 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners