"Lady Chatterley"
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2014 | 2012 | 2011

6 items from 2011


Top 5: Where Are They Now? Brits on TV

3 December 2011 2:56 PM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

To celebrate ITV Studios Home Entertainment’s fantastic Christmas DVD box set collection, including classics such as Prime Suspect, Jeeves & Wooster, Darling Buds of May and The Catherine Cookson Collection, we’ve taken a look at stars past and present – unearthing some modern-day stars with very humble beginnings on the little square box that sits in the corner of the living room…

1) Catherine Zeta-Jones

Although Catherine Zeta Jones began acting in her local theatre, she found her breakthrough role in playing Mariette Larkin in The Darling Buds of May at the tender age of 22.  Jones has seen gone on to become a Hollywood A-lister, married to A List resident Michael Douglas and acting with someone of the biggest film stars including Sean Connery, Julia Roberts, George Clooney, Liam Neeson, Tom Hanks, and Billy Crystal, in such films as The Mask of Zorro, America’s Sweethearts, The Haunting, Intolerable Cruelty and Chicago, »

- Phil

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Ken Russell obituary

29 November 2011 8:21 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Formidable film director with an impish sense of humour and a talent to entertain and provoke

Ken Russell, who has died aged 84, was so often called rude names – the wild man of British cinema, the apostle of excess, the oldest angry young man in the business – that he gave up denying it all quite early in his career. Indeed, he often seemed to court the very publicity that emphasised only the crudest assessment of his work. He gave the impression that he cared not a damn. Those who knew him better, however, knew that he did. Underneath all the showbiz bluster, he was an old softie. Or, perhaps as accurately, a talented boy who never quite grew up.

It has, of course, to be said that he was capable of almost any enormity in the careless rapture he brought to making his films. He could be dreadfully cruel to his undoubted talent, »

- Derek Malcolm

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Redgrave Pays Tribute To Russell

29 November 2011 12:06 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Veteran British actress Vanessa Redgrave has remembered late director Ken Russell as a "genius" and revealed she still treasures a tribute he wrote following the death of her daughter Natasha Richardson.

Tommy director Russell, who passed away on Sunday aged 84, cast Redgrave in 1971 film The Devils and also went on to work with both of her daughters in other productions.

Her youngest daughter Joely Richardson worked with him on TV series Lady Chatterley alongside Sean Bean, while Natasha, who died in a skiing accident in Canada in 2009, broke into movies in Russell's 1986 Frankenstein film Gothic.

Redgrave has now paid her respects to Russell, who comforted her when she lost Natasha two years ago.

She tells the BBC, "I think the most important thing that I could possibly say about Ken is that he was, and his films remain, the works of a genius... I was very honoured to be in The Devils... and my youngest daughter Joely did a wonderful, I thought wonderful, Lady Chatterley's Lover with Ken, and my oldest daughter Natasha did a film about Mary Shelley which was a fantastic film, one of her first big feature films.

"I will be grateful to Ken forever personally because when my Natasha died, he wrote the most wonderful appreciation of her work as an actress which I really treasure, so I'm really sorry for his wife." »

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Ken Russell: Sex, nuns and rock'n'roll

28 November 2011 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Naked wrestling, religious mania and The Who's Tommy: director Ken Russell transformed British cinema. His closest collaborators recall a fierce, funny and groundbreaking talent

Glenda Jackson

I worked with Ken on six films. Women in Love was the first time I'd worked with a director of that genius, and on a film of that size. What I remember most was the creative and productive atmosphere on set: he was open to ideas from everyone, from the clapperboard operator upwards. Like any great director, he knew what he didn't want – but was open to everything else.

As a director he never said anything very specific. He'd say, "It needs to be a bit more … urrrgh, or a bit less hmmm", and you knew exactly what he meant. I used to ask him why he never said "Cut", and he said, "Because it means you always do something different." They gave »

- Melissa Denes, Laura Barnett

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Obituary: Ken Russell

28 November 2011 6:55 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ken Russell, who has died aged 84, was so often called rude names – the wild man of British cinema, the apostle of excess, the oldest angry young man in the business – that he gave up denying it all quite early in his career. Indeed, he often seemed to court the very publicity that emphasised only the crudest assessment of his work. He gave the impression that he cared not a damn. Those who knew him better, however, knew that he did. Underneath all the showbiz bluster, he was an old softie. Or, perhaps as accurately, a talented boy who never quite grew up.

It has, of course, to be said that he was capable of almost any enormity in the careless rapture he brought to making his films. He could be dreadfully cruel to his undoubted talent, »

- Derek Malcolm

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Russell Dead At 84

28 November 2011 4:06 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British moviemaker Ken Russell has died at the age of 84.

Russell directed several classic British films during his 55-year career, including spy thriller Billion Dollar Brain, The Who's rock opera Tommy, and Oscar-winning 1969 movie Women in Love.

He also notched up a range of acting and writing credits, and was working in front of the cameras as recently as 2010, when he played a university lecturer in crime drama Mr. Nice. He even has a role in upcoming horror movie Invasion of the Not Quite Dead.

Actress-turned-politician Glenda Jackson, who won a Best Actress Oscar for her performance in Women in Love, paid tribute to Russell after news of his death was announced on Monday.

She told the BBC, "(It was) just wonderful to work with him and to work with him as often as I did. He created the kind of climate in which actors could do their job and I loved him dearly."

Jackson insisted it's "a great shame" Russell was not more widely recognised in the movie industry, adding: "It was almost as if he never existed - I find it utterly scandalous for someone who was so innovative and a film director of international stature."

Joely Richardson, who starred in Russell's BBC TV series Lady Chatterley, adds, "I will forever feel privileged and honoured to have worked with the great Ken Russell. More than that, I was extremely fond of the man himself."

Russell's fellow British filmmaker Michael Winner told the Daily Mirror, "I've known Ken since 1968. He was the most innovative director. I persuaded Oliver Reed to work with him even though Oliver said, 'I'm not a TV star, I'm a movie star.'

"His television was in a field of its own, it was absolutely extraordinary. Then he graduated to movies... He was also a very nice person. He was very cheerful and very well-meaning. He had a very good run even though his style of picture-making became obsolete, but that happened to everyone, Billy Wilder and (Alfred) Hitchcock."

Russell passed away in a hospital on Sunday after a series of strokes. He is survived by his wife Elize. »

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2014 | 2012 | 2011

6 items from 2011


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