7.1/10
7,566
47 user 23 critic

Indochine (1992)

PG-13 | | Drama, Romance | 23 December 1992 (USA)
This story is set in 1930, at the time when French colonial rule in Indochina is ending. A widowed French woman who works in the rubber fields, raises a Vietnamese princess as if she was ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(original scenario & adaptation and dialogue), (original scenario & adaptation and dialogue) | 2 more credits »
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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 11 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
Guy
...
Henri Marteau ...
Emile
Carlo Brandt ...
Castellani
Gérard Lartigau ...
L'Admiral
Hubert Saint-Macary ...
Raymond (as Hubert Saint Macary)
...
Hebrard
Mai Chau ...
Shen
Alain Fromager ...
Dominique
Chu Hung ...
Mari de Sao
Jean-Baptiste Huynh ...
Étienne, adulte
Thibault de Montalembert ...
Charles-Henri (as Thibault De Montalembert)
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Storyline

This story is set in 1930, at the time when French colonial rule in Indochina is ending. A widowed French woman who works in the rubber fields, raises a Vietnamese princess as if she was her own daughter. She, and her daughter both fall in love with a young French navy officer, which will change both their lives significantly.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence, sensuality and drug related scenes | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

23 December 1992 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Indochine  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Gross:

$5,734,232 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(cut) | (cut)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie was shot in Vietnam, Malaysia, and France. The slave market scenes were shot in Halong Bay in Northeastern Vietnam. The Vietnamese marriage ceremony was shot at the Imperial Palace at Hue in central Vietnam. The Hotel Continental and the rubber factory scenes were shot in Malaysia. The police headquarters, opium den, cabaret, and gambling den scenes were shot in studio sets in Paris, France. See more »

Goofs

42m 19s: One raw block of rubber reappears on the table after it has already been fed through the flattening machine. See more »

Quotes

Yvette: The truth is nobody here likes you. Even the trees wouldn't grow if they had a choice!
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Connections

References Lilac (1932) See more »

Soundtracks

La Baya
Music by Henri Christiné
Lyrics by Marcel Heurtebise
Performed by Dominique Blanc
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Third time to watch it, I still cried for 15 minutes
17 August 2000 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

OK let's get it out of the way up front, Eliane IS France, Camille IS Vietnam the story is their story. Of course it is told from the French viewpoint, France is telling the story about her child growing up. It is a sad story, the French lost. It was not a happy story for the Vietnamese they had to fight for 2 more years to be reunited and struggle for 15 more to start to come out of the whole process. That said this is one of the most beautiful movies ever made, period.

The intricate ballet of personal dealings and politics is carried out so well that one can easily get lost in the levels, just as one can get lost in the intricate dance that is life in Asia. What you see is what you see, it may be more or less depending.

I do not believe that the movie defends France not does it condemn her. That part of the story is wisely left alone, what remains is a human drama of the folly of resisting the inevitability of change. As the film unfolds the sheer weight of history comes down on all involved.

It is that weight that brings the tears. From the time that Jean-Baptiste is brought to Saigon to the closing credits, there is no escape for anyone. The old order is out the new is awaiting its time of entry upon the stage. It is a time for tears, a time to mourn and ultimately a time to heal.

Americans in particular have a funny sense of history. We forget that others have been down the same roads before us. France's relationship with vietnam was most likely more of a force in the history of its people than ours with all of our napalm will ever be, because the French left a legacy of life that could be seen even in the senslessness of the American presence.

This movie captures that relationship and transcends it. Masterpiece is the lest one can say about such a work.


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