6.8/10
133
7 user 2 critic

Hit the Dutchman (1992)

R | | Crime, Drama | 12 June 1992 (USA)
Arthur Flegenheimer is a thief recently released from prison who is recruited by noted hood Jack "Legs" Diamond. Flegenheimer changes his name to Dutch Schultz and, thanks to his brutal and... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) (as Joseph Goldman)
Reviews

Comic-Con 2017: All Aboard the IMDboat

 | 

July 20 to 23, 2017

Get entertainment news, trailer drops, and photos with IMDb's coverage of 2017 San Diego Comic-Con featuring host and IMDboat captain Kevin Smith, including Saturday's live event.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Emma Flegenheimer
Jennifer Pusheck ...
Helen Flegenheimer
Eddie Bowz ...
Joey Noe
...
...
Peter Coll
...
Frances Ireland (as Jennifer Miller)
...
...
Fatty Walsh
...
Tony DiSalvo ...
Dino
Rick Giolito ...
Carmine Genovese
Nic Scott ...
Paperboy
Ignacious Palaciaw ...
Paperboy (as Ignacious Palacious)
Edit

Storyline

Arthur Flegenheimer is a thief recently released from prison who is recruited by noted hood Jack "Legs" Diamond. Flegenheimer changes his name to Dutch Schultz and, thanks to his brutal and unscrupulous ways, rises to become Diamond's right-hand man during the bleak days of Prohibition. Written by morroviolet

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He worked for Legs Diamond. He schemed with Lucky Luciano, His name was Dutch Schultz. See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 June 1992 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A hollandus  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Good gangster flick lacking point of view

This is a very competent gangster flick from 1992, chronicling the life of Dutch Schultz. The production crew seems from their names to be almost entirely of Russian descent (curious) with good representation in the writing department and direction from Jewish backgrounds. The latter is important in the sense of getting the main character (Arthur Fleggenheimer aka Dutch Schultz) "right" in terms of his place in the ethnic society of New York City in the early thirties. Curiously, however, the rise and fall of Dutch is without a point of view. Events are chronicled with no "take" by any of the characters on what is happening in their lives. Without this point of view, the film ultimately falls within the category of "action" rather than "drama."

Most enjoyable are the supporting performances from Eddie Bowz as Joey and Sally Kirkland as Emma - the former winning and heartbreaking, the latter a marvelous "character" turn - Sally is practically unrecognizable. Bruce Nozick as Dutch plays snide and mean with no nuance. The brief appearance by Yelena Skorokhodova as Anastasia is full of potential, but she disappears almost as soon as she is introduced. Christopher Bradley as Vince Coll receives sixth billing and has approximately sixteen scenes - his is a brooding performance with the darting eyes of a caged animal, constantly gauging his path of escape. He does a very good job. The score by Terry Plumeri is of surprisingly high quality and the cinematography by Nicholas Josef von Sternberg (we want to know more - is he a descendant of the great director or did he simply change his name) is cold, raw and very well lit.

All in all, a perfectly enjoyable film of the genre. Not great but certainly not at all bad.


7 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?