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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2002

1-20 of 22 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Boss Baby Review

21 hours ago | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

The Boss Baby is, at its heart, a children’s movie. One that references Glengarry Glen Ross, speaks loudest about work/life imbalance and includes an uncomfortable exchange where a small child tells his baby brother he “won’t suck it.” Like, for an entire minute. Writer Michael McCullers pulls strange influences from Marla Frazee’s similarly-titled literature, most of which zoom over the heads of young audiences. Kids these days will understand deep-dive references to Lord Of The Rings, right? Even worse is an intended obsession with butt jokes (things going in and coming out), along with a Storks-like ignorance about where babies come from.

But hey, look! An infant in a business suit! Just ignore the other aspects of this animated puzzler and go ga-ga for some mini-Banana Republic duds.

Director Tom McGrath’s starts our adventure at Baby Corp., a factory where children appear on white, heavenly slides. »

- Matt Donato

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Being There,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ and More

21 March 2017 9:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Being There (Hal Ashby)

On paper, there’s an implausibility to the central conceit of Being There that could have resulted in a four-quadrant studio comedy forgotten soon after its release. However, with Hal Ashby’s delicate touch — bringing Jerzy Kosiński and Robert C. Jones‘ adaptation to life — and Peter Sellers‘ innocent deadpan delivery, this 1979 film is a carefully observed look at how those we interact with can offer an introspective mirror into our own lives. “There’s so much left to do, »

- The Film Stage

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All Female “Juno” Live-Read Announced to Benefit Planned Parenthood

20 March 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Juno

If there was ever a time we needed a feel-good comedy about a young woman owning her sexuality and reproductive autonomy, it’s now. So, we’re pleased to tell you that a tenth anniversary live-read of “Juno” will be held April 8 to raise funds for Planned Parenthood. Entertainment Weekly reports that “Juno” director Jason Reitman is re-staging the film with stars Ellen Page and Jennifer Garner, and an all female cast at Los Angeles’ Ace Theatre.

The Planned Parenthood live-read will see Page and Garner reprising their roles from the film. The rest of the cast has yet to be announced, but actresses will take on all roles, including the ones Michael Cera, Jason Bateman, and J.K. Simmons originated. Reitman, who will direct, has previously staged all female live-reads of the male-centric “Glengarry Glen Ross” and “Stand by Me.”

Juno” follows a pregnant high school student (Page) who decides to carry her pregnancy to term and give the baby to adoptive parents Vanessa and Mark Loring (Garner and Bateman) — after initially considering and deciding against an abortion. The film was one of the rare depictions of reproductive choice that pleased both sides of the abortion debate: Juno decided to go through with the pregnancy but had access to an abortion. Even though she decided it wasn’t what she wanted, Juno never condemned the notion of abortion or wanted the right to be taken away.

“If there was any confusion about whether ‘Juno’ was pro-choice or pro-life, this [live-read] should settle that,” Reitman told EW. “Juno had a choice, and that was the most important part.”

Reitman discontinued his live-read series last April after five seasons of staging productions like “The Princess Bride” and “Boogie Nights.” After the 2016 election he was inspired to bring it back. “I wanted to find a way to contribute to the causes that have never felt more important,” Reitman said. “It occurred to me that I have this show that could be used as a tool to not only raise money for causes that need the help, but could serve as an opportunity for a group like Planned Parenthood to connect with an audience who can be presented with new ideas, or even an action item.”

“Considering how much this election has done against women and what Planned Parenthood has done for women I thought it would be cool to hear this script with an all-female voice,” Reitman added, referencing the organization’s many services like cancer screenings, Std testing and treatment, pregnancy tests, contraception, and, yes, access to safe, legal abortion.

This is most likely welcome news for “Juno” screenwriter Diablo Cody, who won an Oscar for the script. She has said, “I like talking about women’s issues in film, and feminism.” Cody, who will attend the live-read, continued, “A part of my career is that I am a woman and I’ve committed myself to writing roles for women. I cannot separate myself from that.”

Cody has penned women-centric fare like “Jennifer’s Body,” “Ricki and the Flash,” and “Paradise,” the latter of which she also directed. She is the creator of “One Mississippi,” a dramedy semi-based on star Tig Notaro’s experiences, and her adaptation of the UK series “Raised by Wolves” was recently given a pilot order.

Cody and Reitman reunited in 2011 for “Young Adult,” starring Charlize Theron as a woman who returns home to win back her married high school sweetheart. The duo are collaborating with Theron again for the upcoming “Tully.” The Oscar-winning actress portrays a “mother of three who forms a bond with the title character, a night nanny played by Mackenzie Davis (Sophia Takal’s ‘Always Shine’),” EW details.

Reitman will announce the full cast for the “Juno” live-read via Twitter a few days before the show. Tickets are available for purchase here. All money raised from ticket and merchandise sales will go to Planned Parenthood.

All Female “Juno” Live-Read Announced to Benefit Planned Parenthood was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Exclusive: How ‘Star Wars’ Led J.J. Abrams to His Broadway Debut

14 March 2017 10:55 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

“Theater geek” may not be the most obvious label for J.J. Abrams, who has built a film and TV career directing, writing and producing sci-fi and action-heavy shows (AliasLost), rebooting film franchises (Star TrekStar Wars) and launching his own Easter egg-filled film universe (Cloverfield). But the filmmaker has the same appreciation for Broadway as he does The Twilight Zone, the sci-fi anthology series he’s long considered to be one of the best on TV.

“I’ve been a fan of theater all my life,” Abrams tells Et. In fact, he has been attending shows in New York City, where he was born, since he was a young kid, collecting playbills from every production along the way. “I embarrassingly saved all of them.”

He recalls seeing the original runs of The Magic Show, starring Doug Henning, and Noises Off, as well as various productions of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams plays. He cites Ira Levin »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Elle,’ ‘The Lovers on the Bridge,’ ‘Fences,’ and More

14 March 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Elle (Paul Verhoeven)

Paul Verhoeven’s latest treatise on high / low art isn’t going to appeal to everyone, and, as this awards season has shown, it’s already deeply offended some. But its messiness and blurred moral provocations are key to its power as a piece of cinematic trickery. A masterful character study, Elle dresses up a pulpy morality play with an austere European arthouse sheen, then sends its powerfully passive lead through a minefield of ethical conundrums, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Jackie,’ ’45 Years,’ ‘One More Time With Feeling,’ and More

7 March 2017 7:20 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting »

- The Film Stage

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Alec Baldwin Shares Secret of Playing Trump: ‘Eyebrow Up, Stick My Face Out’ (Video)

1 March 2017 8:40 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

There is an art to playing Donald Trump, and Alec Baldwin has definitely perfected it. The “Glengarry Glen Ross” star walked Jimmy Kimmel through the process of portraying the president on “Saturday Night Live” — and the first time he did it involved far less preparation than you’d think. “The stage manager takes me to my mark for the first dress rehearsal at 8 o’clock, I had no idea what I was going to do,” Baldwin told the “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” host on Wednesday night. Also Read: Photo of Alec Baldwin's 'SNL' Trump Mistakenly Used Instead of »

- Debbie Emery

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Before’ Trilogy, ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Kate Plays Christine,’ ‘Allied,’ and More

28 February 2017 6:12 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, and one of the year’s few truly great American movies. »

- The Film Stage

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9 Oscars Winners Who Don't Hold Up to the Test of Time

24 February 2017 2:05 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Just because a movie or a celebrity wins an Oscar, that doesn't mean the win was deserved. While the Academy Awards are seen as the capstone to awards season -- and one of the highest honors in the business -- we all know that stars and movies get snubbed or overlooked all the time.

What's worse is when we look back at what did win, and shake our heads in confusion and disbelief. So, with the 89th Academy Awards just around the corner, let's take a look back over the show's illustrious history at a few times the Academy voters clearly made a mistake.

Watch: 2017 Oscar Awards Nominees: 'La La Land' Leads With 14 Nominations

1. How Green Was My Valley wins Best Picture at the 14th Academy Awards in 1942

20th Century Fox

Beat Out: Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, Blossoms in the Dust, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, Hold Back the Dawn, The Little Foxes, [link »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

21 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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Fifty Shades Darker review: Dir. James Foley (2017)

11 February 2017 12:30 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Fifty Shades Darker review: The sequel to Fifty Shades Of Grey enters cinemas courtesy of series newcomer James Foley, but does it make the grade?

Fifty Shades Darker review by Awais Irfan, February 2017.

Fifty Shades Darker review

2015’s film adaptation of the smash-hit novel Fifty Shades of Grey was clearly a masterpiece of its time, and a box-office hit, so naturally the follow-up we all wanted is now here: Fifty Shades Darker. Unfortunately for us, this film is perhaps just as bad – if not worse – than its predecessor (you better believe it). Not that this news come as much surprise to anyone, but, to those of you holding onto that shred of hope, this film is not good at all.

As devoid of a plot as this film is, the basic story picks up where the first film left off. Anastasia (Dakota Johnson) has a new job – as an editor »

- Awais Irfan

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Alec Baldwin's 13 Funniest 'Saturday Night Live' Moments

9 February 2017 5:33 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Alec Baldwin is hosting Saturday Night Live for the 17th time this weekend, after guest starring all season playing President Donald Trump.

While fans are no doubt excited to see how Baldwin lampoons the president when he gets a chance to host, the momentous occasion has us feeling nostalgic for all the great comedy the Golden Globe winner has brought to the show since his first time hosting back in October 1990.

Watch: Alec Baldwin Gets Nostalgic About His History with 'SNL' in Hilarious New Promo

Over the past 26 years, Baldwin's career has taken a lot of twists and turns (as has SNL), but his comedic timing and spot-on impressions have never faltered. There's a reason he's hosted more than anyone else in the show's history.

In celebration of his illustrious past with the long-running sketch series, let's take a look at some of Baldwin's best appearances (in no particular order).

1. NPR’s Delicious Dish with »

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'Fifty Shades Darker' Review: Sequel to Kinky-Romance Hit Is 50 Percent Dumber

9 February 2017 1:36 PM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Fifty Shades Dumber is more like it. In our shockingly generous one-star review of Fifty Shades of Grey in 2015, we dismissed the film version of E.L. James' bestseller as Cinderella porn – an S&M fantasy so sanitized it couldn't shock Aunt Tillie. Now here's the followup, again with Dakota Johnson, again vainly trying to have fun as Anastasia Steele. She's is no longer a virginal English major, but a magazine intern with a head for literature and a bod for sin. As you remember, Ana has parted ways with »

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'Fifty Shades Darker' Review: Better Chemistry, Kinkier Sex Scenes and Creepier Shades of Grey

9 February 2017 1:00 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

If director Sam Taylor-Johnson and screenwriter Kelly Marcel elevated Fifty Shades of Grey above E.L. James' original material, the sequel makes a strong argument for why we shouldn't have nice things.

Fifty Shades Darker begins shortly after the elevator doors closed at the end of Fifty Shades of Grey, abruptly ending both the film and Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson) and Christian Grey's (Jamie Dornan) relationship. ("Relationship.") But after a few weeks of heartbroken pining, Ana is easily wooed back to Seattle's wealthiest sadist, this time, supposedly, for an actual relationship with "no rules, no punishments and no more secrets."

Watch: Dakota Johnson Reveals 'Fifty Shades Darker' Has a 'Surprise' Tribute to Mom Melanie Griffith

Universal Pictures

Darker is funnier than Grey, and mostly intentionally so. The movie gets good mileage out of Christian Grey performing boyfriend duties, like grocery shopping and cooking and not flogging his girlfriend. Contrary to the title's promise of darkness, it starts »

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‘Fifty Shades Darker’ Whipped By Critics As ‘Pulse-Poundingly Bad’

9 February 2017 8:37 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

It probably won’t surprise you to hear this, but “Fifty Shades Darker” is getting a sound lashing from critics. So far, the sequel to “Fifty Shades of Grey” has a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 10 percent, with only two positive reviews posted Thursday morning. Critics have ripped the movie for having a dull, repetitive plot that fails to generate any heat despite the presence of its lead actress, Dakota Johnson, as well as having “Glengarry Glen Ross” director James Foley in charge of the project. Whether it’s E.L. James’ novels or the movies adapted from them, the “Fifty Shades »

- Jeremy Fuster

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The Weekend Warrior 2/10/17: The Lego Batman Movie, 50 Shades Darker, John Wick 2

8 February 2017 8:00 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.   

This Past Weekend:                                                                

Bomb, bomb bomb bomb, Boooooomb!  Things just kept getting worse and worse at the box office as this past weekend saw more new releases not meeting up to their potential. The horribly-reviewed horror movie Rings (Paramount) ended up around where I predicted with $13 million, taking second place to M. Night Shyamalan’s Split. The sci-fi romance The Space Between Us (Stx Entertainment) didn’t make much of a mark, opening in ninth place with just $3.8 million with about $1,300 per theater. Robert De Niro’s The Comedian (Sony Classics) tanked worse than many recent movies, making less than a million in 848 theaters or about $1,000 per theater. By comparison, the doc I Am Not Your Negro made about 78% of that amount in 800 less theaters. »

- Edward Douglas

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Militia: Jack Huston, Jeffrey Dean Morgan And Ralph Ineson Join Black List Script Production

7 February 2017 1:30 PM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Henry Dunham's Black List script from 2015, Militia, is moving forward according to a report over at Deadline. Jack Huston, Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Ralph Ineson are attached to the project.    Described as an intense character study mixed with suspense and violence, Militia is said to be in the vein of Heat, The Usual Suspects and Glengarry Glen Ross. The story picks up after a shooting at a police funeral by a suspected militia member. A recluse ex-cop and fellow militia man must then interrogate the suspected gunman in his own militia, before copycat attacks start a nationwide war.   Huston (Ben Hur, Boardwalk Empire) is attached as “Gannon,” Morgan (The Walking Dead, Watchmen) as “Olsen” and Ineson (The Witch) as “Morris.”   (Henry...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Loving,’ ‘The Lobster,’ and More

7 February 2017 1:06 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cameraperson (Kirsten Johnson)

A travelogue through one artist’s subconscious, Cameraperson is perhaps the most plural film of 2016 – a formal, tonal, situational, and pacing exercise that lulls viewers into thinking it’s set on one thing before turning towards seemingly new territory. And it never feels out-of-balance because director Kirsten Johnson has, by building this film around moments that “marked” her, granted such an intimate experience that it almost feels wrong to intellectualize much of anything that’s going on here, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Watermelon Woman,’ ‘Carol,’ ‘The Reflektor Tapes,’ and More

31 January 2017 9:17 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arcade Fire: The Reflektor Tapes (Kahlil Joseph)

A list of things The Reflektor Tapes comes close to being but doesn’t quite end up as: a concert film stitching together Arcade Fire‘s work on a worldwide tour supporting their most recent album, Reflektor; a travelogue of said tour; a sense-memory visual essay tracing the years-long life of songs, tracing from hashing-out and recording to a presentation for thousands of screaming, jumping fans; a channel-futzing sonic exploration »

- The Film Stage

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2002

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