IMDb > Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)
Glengarry Glen Ross
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Glengarry Glen Ross (1992) More at IMDbPro »

Videos (see all 5)
Glengarry Glen Ross -- hv post
Glengarry Glen Ross -- An examination of the machinations behind the scenes at a real estate office.
Glengarry Glen Ross -- An examination of the machinations behind the scenes at a real estate office.
Glengarry Glen Ross -- An examination of the machinations behind the scenes at a real estate office.

Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   60,208 votes »
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Down 4% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers (WGA):
David Mamet (play)
David Mamet (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Glengarry Glen Ross on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
2 October 1992 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The hardest thing in life is sell See more »
Plot:
An examination of the machinations behind the scenes at a real estate office. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 5 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Mamet Sells It See more (353 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Al Pacino ... Ricky Roma

Jack Lemmon ... Shelley Levene

Alec Baldwin ... Blake

Alan Arkin ... George Aaronow

Ed Harris ... Dave Moss

Kevin Spacey ... John Williamson

Jonathan Pryce ... James Lingk

Bruce Altman ... Larry Spannel

Jude Ciccolella ... Detective
Paul Butler ... Policeman
Lori Tan Chinn ... Coat Check Girl

Neal Jones ... Man in Donut Shop
Barry Rohrssen ... Assistant Detective (as Barry Rossen)
Leigh French ... Additional Voices (voice)
George Cheung ... Additional Voices (voice)

Murphy Dunne ... Additional Voices (voice)

Dana Lee ... Additional Voices (voice)
Julie Payne ... Additional Voices (voice)
Gregory Snegoff ... Additional Voices (voice) (as Greg Snegoff)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Skipp Lynch ... Telephone Service Man (uncredited)
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Directed by
James Foley 
 
Writing credits
(WGA)
David Mamet (play)

David Mamet (screenplay)

Produced by
Joseph M. Caracciolo Jr. .... executive producer (as Joseph Caracciolo Jr.)
Nava Levin .... co-producer
Karen L. Oliver .... associate producer
Morris Ruskin .... co-producer
Jerry Tokofsky .... producer
Stanley R. Zupnik .... producer
 
Original Music by
James Newton Howard 
 
Cinematography by
Juan Ruiz Anchía (director of photography) (as Juan Ruiz Anchia)
 
Film Editing by
Howard E. Smith  (as Howard Smith)
 
Casting by
Bonnie Timmermann 
 
Production Design by
Jane Musky 
 
Art Direction by
William Barclay  (as Bill Barclay)
 
Set Decoration by
Robert J. Franco 
 
Costume Design by
Jane Greenwood 
 
Makeup Department
Sheryl Berkoff .... makeup artist
Colleen Callaghan .... hair stylist
Alan D'Angerio .... hair department head
Sharon Ilson .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Celia D. Costas .... unit production manager
Patricia Anne Doherty .... assistant production manager
Helene Mulholland .... post-production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Harvey Epstein .... dga trainee
Richard Patrick .... second assistant director (as Richard Drew Patrick)
Thomas A. Reilly .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Kenneth Albanese .... carpenter (as Ken J. Albanese)
James J. Archer .... set dresser (as Jim Archer)
Billy Bishop .... props
John R. Ford .... assistant property master
Andrew Gangloff .... carpenter (as Andy G. Gangloff Sr.)
Robert Griffon Jr. .... property master (as Robert J. Griffon)
Denise Gurkas .... scenic artist
George Hugel .... carpenter (as George A. Hugel)
Tim Kearney .... stand-by carpenter
Robert H. Klatt .... set dresser
Douglas F. Lebrecht .... scenic artist (as Douglas Lebrecht)
Caty Maxey .... draftsman
Tom McDermott .... set dresser (as Thomas McDermott)
John McDonnell .... props (as John B. McDonnell)
Fred Merusi .... construction coordinator
Jack Mortellaro .... props
Billy Patsos .... construction grip (as Bill Patsos)
Robert T. Prate .... key construction grip (as Robert Prate)
John Ralbovsky .... scenic artist
Leslie Salter .... scenic artist
Bob Shaw .... assistant art director
William Sohmer .... camera scenic artist (as Bill Sohmer)
Dick Tice .... leadperson
Richard A. Ventre .... master scenic artist (as Richard Ventre)
Patricia Walker .... camera scenic artist
Don Zappia .... construction grip
 
Sound Department
Wayne Artman .... sound re-recording mixer
Ed Callahan .... sound effects editor
Tom E. Dahl .... sound re-recording mixer
Thom 'Coach' Ehle .... stereo sound consultant: Dolby Stereo (as Thom Ehle)
John Fundus .... second boom operator
Howell Gibbens .... supervising sound editor
Matthew Harrison .... foley editor
Denise Horta .... dialogue editor
Frank Howard .... sound effects editor
Chris Ingram .... assistant sound editor
Joseph A. Ippolito .... dialogue editor
Frank Jones .... sound re-recording mixer
Constance A. Kazmer .... dialogue editor
Lisa J. Levine .... supervising adr editor
Danny Michael .... sound mixer
Jonathan Phillips .... assistant sound editor
Daniel Rosenblum .... second boom operator
Andrew Schmetterling .... boom operator
Edward M. Steidele .... foley artist (as Edward Stidell)
 
Special Effects by
Mike Maggi .... special effects coordinator
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Joe Collins .... camera trainee
Doug Dalisera .... electrician
Jerry DeBlau .... gaffer
Richie Ford .... best boy electric
Bill Gerardo .... second assistant camera (as William Gerardo)
Vinnie Gerardo .... first assistant camera (as Vincent Gerardo)
Craig Haagensen .... camera operator
Paul Kinghan .... electrician
Sal Lanza .... best boy grip
Martin Lowry .... grip
Arthur Moshlak .... house electrician
Fred Muller .... electrician
John Panuccio .... best boy grip (as Jack Panuccio)
Louis Petraglia .... set electrician
Peter John Petraglia .... rigging gaffer (as John Petraglia)
Tom Prate .... dolly grip (as Thomas Prate Jr.)
Tom Prate .... key grip (as Thomas Prate Jr.)
Andrew D. Schwartz .... still photographer (as Andrew Schwartz)
Lance Shepherd .... electrician (as Lance A. Shepherd)
Matty Sicurella .... grip
Joseph Viano .... grip (as Joe Viano)
Russell Caldwell .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Sylvia Fay .... extras casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
David Charles .... associate costume designer (as David M. Charles)
Kevin P. Faherty .... wardrobe supervisor
Hartsell Taylor .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Editorial Department
Gary Burritt .... negative cutter: Kona Cutting
Pam Di Fede .... second assistant editor: New York
Joe Fineman .... post-production consultant
Elizabeth Schwartz .... first assistant editor: New York
Terilyn A. Shropshire .... first assistant editor: Los Angeles (as Terilyn Shropshire)
Bambi Sickafoose .... second assistant editor: Los Angeles
Mary Skinner .... post-production assistant
Nick Smith .... assistant editor
Mike Stanwick .... color timer
 
Music Department
Brad Dechter .... orchestrator
Sandy DeCrescent .... music contractor
George Greif .... music advisor
Tom Kramer .... music editor
Tommy LiPuma .... additional music producer: songs
Tommy LiPuma .... score producer
Tommy LiPuma .... score supervisor
Johnny Mandel .... additional music producer: songs
Michael Mason .... scoring coordinator
Robert Schaper .... score mixer
Wayne Shorter .... musician: tenor and soprano sax
Peter Erskine .... musician (uncredited)
 
Transportation Department
Richard Babcock .... driver
Ed Battista .... driver
Henry Boyle .... driver
Richard Curry .... driver
Phil Ford .... driver
John Leonidas .... teamster captain
Dennis Radesky .... teamster co-captain
Barry Sweeney .... driver
James Patrick Whalen Jr. .... driver (as James Whalen Sr.)
 
Other crew
Michael Alpert .... unit publicist
Andrew Bernstein .... set production assistant
Carol Chambers .... assistant: Mr. Foley
John C. Ching .... assistant: Mr. Foley
Christie Colliopoulos .... assistant: Mr. Tokofsky
Sandy Cuomo .... production coordinator
Patricia Anne Doherty .... location manager
Dianne Dreyer .... script supervisor
JoAnn Foley .... office production assistant
Marisa Forzano .... associate: Mr. Pacino
Christopher Gambale .... location manager
Gregory Gieras .... set production assistant
Raphaella Giugliano .... assistant production accountant
Mike Hall .... unit publicist
Julie Hansen .... post-production accountant
Antonio Huidor .... production assistant
David Hummel .... production assistant
Delroy Hunter .... parking coordinator (as Delroy M. Hunter)
Bud Isenberg .... insurance
Tim Judge .... assistant
Leslie Loftis .... set production assistant
Justin Moritt .... set production assistant
Christo Morse .... office production assistant
Donald Murphy .... office production assistant
Christopher D. Ozerofer .... production counsel
Bridget Pickering .... assistant: Mr. Timmerman
Danielle Rigby .... set production assistant
Lori H. Schwartz .... production associate
Susan Senk .... unit publicist
Stacey Spencer .... craft service
Laurence Starkman .... title designer
Michael Vieira .... assistant: Alec Baldwin
Rosanne Vogel .... production accountant
Christian von Tippelskirch .... assistant location manager
Nicholas Wolfert .... production assistant
 
Thanks
Jacob A. Bloom .... thanks (as Jake Bloom)
Steve Brookman .... thanks
Tom Hunter .... thanks
Jon Levin .... thanks
Harvey Polly .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for language
Runtime:
100 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Canada:14A (British Columbia/Manitoba) | Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) | Canada:AA (Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-10 | France:U | Germany:12 | Iceland:L | Netherlands:AL | New Zealand:M | Norway:5 | Peru:14 | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | Singapore:M18 (cut) | South Korea:15 | Spain:13 | Sweden:11 | UK:15 | USA:R (certificate #31643)
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
When approached about the movie, David Mamet asked for $500,000 for the movie rights and another $500,000 to write the screenplay, which Zupnik agreed to pay, planning to cut a deal with a cable company to bankroll the movie. However, because of the uncompromising subject matter and abrasive language, no major company was interested in financing the project. Ultimately, financing came from multiple small cable and video companies, a German television station, an Australian movie theater chain, several banks, and New Line Cinema.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: While Shelley is recounting to Roma the latter part of his close of his $82,000 Nyborg sale, the office door is wide open, no lights are on in the office, and clearly nobody is moving around in the office. Then Shelley calls to Williamson for more leads. When the camera angle changes, the office door is closed and Williamson has to open the door to come out into the room to answer that "the leads are coming."See more »
Quotes:
George Aaronow:Come in here! I work here. I didn't come in here to be mistreated.
Williamson:Go to lunch, will you?
George Aaronow:That's why I've, I've, I've... I've came to work today! That's why!
Williamson:The leads are coming in, I'll let you know.
George Aaronow:That's why I came in here! I thought...
Williamson:Just to go to lunch!
George Aaronow:I don't wanna go to lunch!
Williamson:Go to lunch, George!
George Aaronow:When does he get off? Talking that way to a working man.
Williamson:[trying to enter the room]
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Employee of the Month (2006)See more »
Soundtrack:
Blue SkiesSee more »

FAQ

What exactly happens between Williamson, Lingk and Roma? Why does Roma lose his temper with Williamson?
Williamson goes home before Roma closes the deal with Lingk. Yet the next day Williamson says he had the signed contract on his desk before he left for the night. Is this a continuity error?
What is the significance of the title?
See more »
60 out of 74 people found the following review useful.
Mamet Sells It, 13 January 2002
Author: jhclues from Salem, Oregon

Those who must rely on their wits to make a living are often prone to desperate measures born of the insecurities inherent in their field of endeavor-- a straight commission salesman, for example; or in this instance, a real estate salesman, in particular. And under pressure, to what will one in such a position resort to stay afloat when times are tough? A legitimate question that every consumer would no doubt like to have answered before signing the dotted line and committing some big money to a purchase. Well, hold tight, because help is on the way, as writer/director David Mamet goes to great lengths to answer it in `Glengarry Glen Ross,' an unflinching, hard-edged film that examines the motivations of those who would readily and eagerly separate you from more than a few of your hard earned dollars, and whose least concern, apparently, is the value of their product or that parcel of land, which according to them is situated just this side of Shangri-la. And if you've ever trusted a big-ticket salesman in your life, after visiting Mamet's film, it's doubtful you ever will again.

Very simply, the story is this: The Company wants results; the hierarchy expects their salesmen to produce, and they don't care how. Toward that end, a `motivator' (Alec Baldwin), has been dispatched to this particular office to put things into perspective for those who would sell their wares, as it were. The deal is, that at the end of a given period of time, the salesman whose name is at the top of the tote board will get a new car; those who fail to meet their quota are out the door. End of story. They will, however, be supplied with `leads,' but from the `old' file. The new, `fresh' leads are reserved for those who first prove themselves worthy, those who can do whatever it takes to make the sale, without qualm, reservation or conscience. But the prospect of being put on the street in the wake of the give-no-quarter edict only serves to drive one amongst them to an act of desperation-- an irrational act from which there can be no forgiveness and no redemption. A tough verdict, but then again, nobody said life was going to be easy.

In adapting his own play for the screen, Mamet returns to one of his favorite themes by exploring yet another variation of the `con' forever being perpetrated somewhere, on someone, in one way or another. In Mamet's world (in films such as `House of Games' and the more recent `Heist') nothing is ever as it seems, and the confidence game is always afoot, the causes and effects of which make up the drama of his stories. And this film is no exception. Whether it's the smooth and savvy top-dog of the office, Ricky Roma (Al Pacino), schmoozing a client into handing over a check, or a veteran loser like Shelley Levene (Jack Lemmon) showing up at someone's door on a cold call at a most inopportune and inconvenient moment and refusing to leave, Mamet convincingly maintains that the con-is-always-on, and the result-- especially in this film-- is a bleak, but riveting commentary on the human condition, delivered with an intensity that will keep you on the very edge of your emotional seat right up to the end.

The cast Mamet assembled for this offering is superb: Al Pacino is in top form and extremely effective with a comparatively tempered performance; the scene in which he lulls his customer (played by Jonathan Pryce) into complacency is absolutely hypnotic. This is the salesman you hope you never encounter, especially if something like the Brooklyn Bridge is being offered, as such overtures as those proffered by Ricky Roma are just too hard to refuse. And Pacino not only sells it, he closes the deal, as well.

Ed Harris, as Dave Moss, is outstanding, also, creating a character whose bitterness seems to flow from the inside out, and has long since overwhelmed that ability and better part of himself that could've made him a successful salesman, had he but turned his energies to more positive concerns and away from the self-defeating, self-pity into which he has descended. While at the opposite end of the spectrum is George, played by Alan Arkin, who unlike Dave (who though unable to act upon it, at least had promise at some point in his career) has nothing but insecurity and empty dreams to sustain him. As wonderfully realized by Arkin, he's the proverbial duck-out-of-water, who belongs anywhere except in a job as a salesman.

The best performance of all, however, is turned in by Jack Lemmon, who in Shelley Levene creates a character so steeped in despair and hopelessness that's it's almost tangible. You have but to look into Lemmon's eyes to understand the turmoil and depth of Shelley's desperation, and Lemmon successfully conveys the complexities of this man in terms that are believable and incredibly real. He makes Shelley a guy you can feel for without necessarily sympathizing with him. It's simply a terrific piece of work by a terrific actor.

Another of the film's strengths is the performance by Kevin Spacey, as John Williamson, the office manager. It's an understated, but pivotal role, and Spacey does a good job of making it convincing, which ultimately heightens the overall impact of the film, especially the climax.

The supporting cast includes Bruce Altman (Mr. Spannel), Jude Ciccoledda (Detective) and Paul Butler (Policeman). Mamet builds and sustains a tension throughout this film that drives the anxiety level through the roof; at times, it's exhausting to watch. In the end, however, `Glengarry Glen Ross' is a satisfying experience, involving very real situations with which many in the audience will be able to relate, and delivered with a high-powered energy equal to the subject matter. And once you catch your breath, it's one you're going to appreciate even more. It's the magic of the movies. I rate this one 9/10.



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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Glengarry Glen Ross (1992)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
How Dumb is Williamson? *spoilers* lenlarga
Pacino or Lemmon? kag2-1
Painful Watching Shelly Try to sell alexjx
what do you think lingk was going to say to roma? devilsplaythang
Put...the coffee...down! lulu20025
Would you guys let your bosses talk to you like that? DoubleRD77
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