7.0/10
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96 user 39 critic

Bob Roberts (1992)

A right-wing folk singer becomes a corrupt politician and runs a crooked election campaign. Only one independent muck-raking reporter is trying to stop him.

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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Terry Manchester
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Senator Brickley Paiste
Rebecca Jenkins ...
Delores Perrigrew
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Franklin Dockett
John Ottavino ...
Clark Anderson
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Bart Macklerooney
Kelly Willis ...
Clarissa Flan
Merrilee Dale ...
Polly Roberts
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Dr. Caleb Menck
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Mack Laflin
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Storyline

Documentary-style look at the fictional Senatorial campaign of Bob Roberts, an arch-conservative folk singer turned politician. This political satire includes several original songs co-written and performed by writer/director/star Tim Robbins, and cameo appearances by other stars as reporters and news anchors. Written by Scott Renshaw <as.idc@forsythe.stanford.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Vote first. Ask questions later. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for momentary language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

4 September 1992 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Bob Roberts - Candidato ao Poder  »

Box Office

Gross:

$4,479,470 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Tim Robbins touted this project around the various studios for six years. Ironically, for a film about the American political process, it was the English production company Working Title that came up with the necessary funds. See more »

Goofs

In a scene where Bob gets off the bus in "Harrisburg" a police barrier clearly says "City of Philadelphia." See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Davis: We all think you are wonderful and we just wish there was a way we could vote for you three times.
Bob Roberts: Well, there is.
Mrs. Davis: Really?
Bob Roberts: [after a pause, then laughs] Just kidding!
See more »

Crazy Credits

At the very end of the credits there is the screen-filling four-letter word 'VOTE'. See more »

Connections

References This Is Spinal Tap (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Drugs Stink
Music and Lyrics by David Robbins & Tim Robbins
Produced and Arranged by David Robbins
Additional Vocal and Guitar by Kelly Willis
Robbins Egg Music (c) 1992, A.S.C.A.P.
See more »

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User Reviews

As much a satire on the left as the right
28 October 2004 | by (Regina, Saskatchewan) – See all my reviews

I can understand why Republicans would be upset by this film, but I think that Democrats and/or small-"l" liberals should squirm when they watch this, too. The real sting in this film is that, devious and repulsive as Bob Roberts is, he is far more charismatic and interesting than his tired rival, Brickley Paiste (Gore Vidal), and he has managed to appropriate all of the weapons of the 1960s protest movements (including that most sacred insitution of all, folk music) and use them with a vigour that is scarily convincing. Roberts has the adulation of young men and women (watch for a young Jack Black as a smitten fan), the power of the record industry, and access to concerts halls and media coverage to get his message across. What does the left have? A rabid underground journalist (Bugs Raplin), a goofy "Saturday Night Live"-type show (Cutting Edge Live) that may once have been edgy, but now just seems silly (even Roberts himself is a fan), a tired old senator droning on about social programs (Paiste), and a few strident voices crying in the wilderness, (including the journalist played by Lynne Thigpen). Roberts has replaced Bob Dylan as the "voice of his generation" (Robbins includes a hilarious riff on Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues" video from "Don't Look Back"). Robbins' real target here is how the ideals of the 60s have failed miserably, how times have changed back, and how greed, self-interest and intolerance have become the new order of the 1990s (and continue today). Roberts is *not* George Bush (senior or junior)--he's a much more frightening animal who shows up just how the voices of dissent have dwindled into insignificance.


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