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The Blacklist Season 3: Top Five Moments

If you’ve never watched “The Blacklist”, you’re missing out on one of the most intriguing shows on TV today. On the show, Raymond “Red” Reddington is the anti-hero, a wanted fugitive, former secret agent, and a brilliant man with his fingers in innumerable illegal, (Ok maybe some of them might be legal), goings-on all over the world. The character is played flawlessly by James Spader. You may remember James from things like “Sex Lies & Videotape”, “Stargate”, “The Practice”, “Boston Legal”, “Less Than Zero”, “Pretty in Pink”, “Crash”, “White Palace”, “Secretary”, and as the smarmy lawyer in “Wall Street”. Rolling

The Blacklist Season 3: Top Five Moments
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94
Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies

  • SoundOnSight
Human beings and their affectionate vibes are something special. After all, we as individuals are going to love who we feel are worth loving. However, society demands that the protocol of loving should be straight-forward and “natural”. The rule of thumb: stick to your own kind! Whether it is being loyal to your own kind racially or culturally or either with your own age range the expectation of romance is defined…do not make waves and keep things safe and mainstream!

Well, human beings can be also unpredictable and live for going against the grain especially certain characters and personalities in the movies. Love and romance make for great film fodder but when the notion of such on-screen amorous activities takes its theme to a whole new challenging level then the gloves are off!

In Stop in the Name of Love: Top Ten Forbidden Romances in the Movies we will
See full article at SoundOnSight »

A Blonde James Spader Talks About Keeping His Integrity in 1990!

A Blonde James Spader Talks About Keeping His Integrity in 1990!
Ever wonder what James Spader looks like with a head full of hair? Et was with The Blacklist star back in 1990, when he and his luscious dirty blonde locks were starring opposite Susan Sarandon in the romantic drama, White Palace.

Spader was passionate about his decision to be an actor – he even left high school to pursue his career full-time.

“It's hard work and I'm not going to be cavalier about it,” said Spader. “It is something I care a great deal about and something that is quite an investment.”

Flashback: 14-Year-Old Seth Green Rocked a Sweet Mullet in '88

While Spader takes his career as an actor very seriously, he vowed to never let it affect his personal life.

“I refuse to let my home life and my life with my friends and my family be compromised by what it is I do for a living. I refuse to let that happen,” Spader said. “As
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Susan Sarandon on Her Vampire Lesbian Sex Scene With Catherine Deneuve

  • Vulture
Susan Sarandon on Her Vampire Lesbian Sex Scene With Catherine Deneuve
Welcome to Sexpositions, a weeklong Vulture celebration of sex scenes in movies and on TV. Throughout her long and fearless career, Susan Sarandon has appeared in a panoply of skin-baring scenes. She was the older, bolder woman who seduced a young widower played by James Spader in White Palace (1988). In Bull Durham (1990), she was a philosophical baseball groupie who bedded dim fireballer Tim Robbins. Atlantic City (1980) saw her slowly wiping down with a sponge while Burt Lancaster’s aging gangster peeps through her open window. Sarandon’s most famous erotic scene, though, is undoubtedly her tryst with Catherine Deneuve — the latter is a vampire attempting to swap blood, or “transfuse,” with Sarandon’s non-vamp — in Tony Scott’s 1983 horror flick The Hunger. Here, the actress talks us through one of cinema’s most memorable intimate encounters.We had to come up with who was pitching and who was catching. Originally,
See full article at Vulture »

Mindy Newell: Not Such A Dark, Glittering Intelligence

  • Comicmix
“What Spader’s Reddington demonstrates is a dark, glittering intelligence and that makes him a fascinating character,” wrote my pal and fellow columnist John Ostrander here on ComicMix yesterday, discussing James Spader’s work as the protagonist (antagonist?) on NBC’s The Blacklist (Mondays at 10 Pm Edt USA).

I read John’s column after reading A House Divided: Extremism And The Lessons Of History by Sean Wilentz and its accompanying article, Inside The Gop’s Suicide Machine by Tom Dickinson in the National Affairs section of the current Rolling Stone Magazine.

Over the last decade, my imagination has sometimes taken me to sinister places when I have thought about the future of the United States of America. Since George W. Bush became President through the manipulation of the vote in Florida and the engineering of his election to office by the Supreme Court, it has seemed not unbelievable to me that a cabal,
See full article at Comicmix »

Eileen Brennan obituary

Actor who made her name in comedy films as an acid-tongued, gravel-voiced tyrant

Eileen Brennan, who has died aged 80, had been a stage actor since the late 1950s, but it was as a largely comic presence in Us cinema of the 1970s and early 1980s that she was most widely admired. As the pitiless Captain Doreen Lewis, putting a dippy new recruit – Goldie Hawn – through her paces in the hit military comedy Private Benjamin (1980), she wore her trademark look: a solid frizz of red hair, a clenched, sneering smile and an expression of withering incredulity. Then there was the gravelly voice: a heard-it-all whine to match that seen-it-all face. It sounded like bourbon on the rocks. Actual rocks, that is.

Captain Lewis epitomised the sort of role Brennan was best at – and which she was still playing as late as 2001, when she made the first in a run of appearances
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hammer Chillers Online Audio Dramas Set to Begin June 7; CD Digipak Releasing July 26

  • Dread Central
Hammer Chillers is a new horror anthology series that will premiere June 7th. Available first as six 30-minute weekly downloadable episodes from the Hammer website, the collected series will also be released on CD July 26th with special bonus material.

Writers for the first series include some of the biggest names working in horror today: Stephen Volk (Ghostwatch, The Awakening), Mark Morris (Toady, Vampire Circus), Stephen Gallagher (Chimera, The Eleventh Hour), Christopher Fowler (The Bryant and May Mysteries), Paul Magrs (The Brenda and Effie Mysteries, Doctor Who) and comedian Robin Ince (Radio 4’s The Infinite Monkey Cage).

“Hammer films have been a massive influence on my writing from the days when I sneaked into the White Palace cinema in my home town of Pontypridd to see the likes of The Devil Rides Out and The Vampire Lovers,” says Stephen Volk. “Now to be writing an audio drama under the Hammer
See full article at Dread Central »

Still sexy Susan Sarandon pops up in interesting trailers for Robot & Frank and Arbitrage

  • JoBlo
I will admit freely that I have a crush on Susan Sarandon. Seeing her in The Rocky Horror Picture Show did all kinds of things to my when I was young. Then, as a teen, seeing her in Bull Durham, White Palace, and The Hunger cemented it. Even in recent years, she has held up very well in the looks department and is still a quality actress to boot. This week we have two new trailers featuring Ms. Sarandon in supporting, yet significant roles. She may not necessarily be the top billed star...
See full article at JoBlo »

Aff Conversations in Film: Writer Ted Tally and 'Silence of the Lambs'

  • Slackerwood
My number-one recommendation to anyone interested in screenwriting in Austin is to pay close attention to the Austin Film Festival (Aff) offerings. Not just the mentoring sessions and panels at the festival itself in October, but also throughout the year when Aff hosts "Conversations in Film" screenings and sessions. This series brings veterans of the television and film industry together with fans as well as emerging filmmakers and writers to discuss their works and the medium.

The most recent Conversations in Film session, on Sunday, March 25, at the Harry Ransom Center, featured Academy Award-winning screenwriter Ted Tally (White Palace, The Silence of the Lambs, All the Pretty Horses) and was moderated by Alvaro Rodriguez (From Dusk Til Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter, Machete) -- seen above. Tally has received acclaim for his adaptations of the works of bestselling authors including Cormac McCarthy, Thomas Harris, Rosellen Brown and George Dawes Green.
See full article at Slackerwood »

Q&A: 'Jeff' Directors Mark and Jay Duplass on Lovable Losers and Susan Sarandon

  • NextMovie
Director siblings Mark and Jay Duplass have always made movies about the "epically small" things in life -- a puffy chair, a bag on someone’s head, a missing pair of sneakers -- and how big they can become in the right situation.

After attending the University of Texas, the brothers became associated with the Mumblecore micro-budget filmmaking movement out of Austin. Their Diy films, "The Puffy Chair" and "Baghead," got the mainstream’s attention; yet they maintained the same aesthetic principles even after their 2010 studio debut "Cyrus."

The pair is in top form with "Jeff, Who Lives at Home," which has their films' trademark vulnerability, raw tension and clumsy relationships. The movie centers on stoner/couch philosopher Jeff (Jason Segel) who, sent on an errand by his mother (Susan Sarandon), ends up on a quest to fulfill his destiny. His brother Pat (Ed Helms) also enlists Jeff’s help
See full article at NextMovie »

Curio: Happy Birthday Susan

Alexa here.  I have an abiding love for Susan Sarandon, who turns 65 today. It's great to see her going strong, supporting Wall Street protesters and getting Sister Helen Prejean to preside over her daughter's wedding.  While I'm still waiting to find some killer indie poster designs of my favorite Susan films (The Hunger, White Palace), here are some fun curios from around the internet celebrating the beauty with the planet-sized eyes.

Janet and Brad paper dolls, available here.

Rolling Roadshow Thelma and Louise poster by Kelly Thorn.

Hot magazine and cool portrait after the jump
See full article at FilmExperience »

Understanding Scorsese: A Martin Scorsese Profile (Part 3)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary American filmmaker Martin Scorsese in the third of a five part feature... read parts one and two.

When he was approached by Paul Newman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid), who wanted to revise his signature role of Fast Eddie Felson from The Hustler (1961), Martin Scorsese was skeptical about the project. “I had a lot of reservations about it,” admitted the filmmaker of the planned cinematic adaptation of The Color of Money (1986) by novelist Walter Tevis. “I felt it was a literal sequel. There were even a few minutes of film inserted in it from the first picture. It had its own merits, but it certainly wasn’t the kind of thing I wanted to do.” A meeting was held in New York between the acting legend and the director where the decision was made to keep the name of the book but
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'I never talk to my shrink about comedy'

In his latest film, Ben Stiller plays a man having a midlife crisis. Is it a case of art imitating life?

The first thing Ben Stiller does is walk to the window of the Chateau Marmont and point out across the rooftops: "See that house behind those palm trees?" he says.

I peer and nod. "I used to live there. Back in 96, 97, it must have been."

"You've been in La how long?"

"Twenty years," he says returning to sit on the sofa, his arms across his knees. "A long time."

Time has been on Stiller's mind a lot recently. It seems only yesterday that he was tweaking the pomposity of Bono and Tom Cruise on The Ben Stiller Show, or voicing Generation X disaffection in the film Reality Bites. These days he calls Cruise to ask him to play a cameo in a movie, and every time he looks around,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Streep Nom #9 and Act III: Funny Lady

Streep at 60: We've been looking at each Meryl Streep Oscar nod and its competition. Previously 78, 79, 81, 82 and 83, 85, 87 and 88

I believe that Meryl Streep's film career can be divided into five chapters or acts (thus far).

Act I (Liberated Lady) 1977-1981Act II (Chamaeleonidae Erotica) 1981-1988Act III (Funny Lady) 1989-1992Act IV (???) 1993-2001Act V (The Great Entertainer) 2002-presentAfter the High Drama years it came as a shock to many when Meryl was suddenly making comedies. Some felt it was a career crisis and there was some backlash going on. This is possibly hard to comprehend for her new young fans but great success always leads to it and many people were sick of Streep's total dominance as the Eighties wound down. It was somewhat common wisdom at the time that her run at the top was ending, having turned 40 in 1989. Several younger stars were coming into their own
See full article at FilmExperience »

Sydney Pollack dies at 73

Sydney Pollack dies at 73
Sydney Pollack, who won an Academy Award as best director for "Out of Africa," died Monday of cancer at his home in Pacific Palisades. He was 73.

Pollack also was nominated for a best director Oscar for "Tootsie" and "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" Pollack won an Emmy for his direction of "The Game" in 1965, starring Cliff Robertson. In addition to his Oscar for "Out of Africa," which also won best picture, that film also earned Pollack the best director honor from the New York Critics Film Circle.

Among the 100 best American love stories ranked by American Film Institute in June 2002, Pollack is the only director credited with two films near the top of list: "The Way We Were," at No. 6, and "Out of Africa," which is ranked No. 13.

In 2000, Pollack was honored with the John Huston Award from the DGA as a "defender of artists' rights."

His filmography included
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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