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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 41 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Nora Twomey — “The Breadwinner”

8 September 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

The Breadwinner

Nora Twomey is a filmmaker and co-founder of Cartoon Saloon, the twice Oscar-nominated animation studio based in Ireland. Having co-directed “The Secret of Kells” with Tomm Moore, Twomey went on to head the story team for “Song of the Sea” and was creative producer on the Netflix preschool show “Puffin Rock.” “The Breadwinner” is her first solo-directed feature.

The Breadwinner” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 10.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Nt: This is the story of a young girl called Parvana, who is growing up in Taliban controlled Kabul in 2001. Parvana helps her father in the marketplace but when he attempts to sell her best dress because they have no money, Parvana acts out, insulting her sister and refusing to apologize.

Soon afterward her father is arrested by the Taliban. The family doesn’t know if they’ll ever see him again and Parvana is left with a child’s guilt. She can’t forget the look on his face. She has to find him, to tell him she is sorry.

Her family cannot survive without a male relative to earn a living for them, so Parvana cuts her hair and dresses as a boy. Kabul opens up to her as she walks through the city in boys’ clothes and she finds a freedom she had never known. But she cannot forget her father and risks her life to see him again.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Nt: I read Deborah Ellis’ book “The Breadwinner” very quickly. I had seldom experienced a character as solid, as wonderfully flawed and real as Parvana. In many ways, she was different to me, but in other ways I understood her on a very deep level. I knew she could move mountains. I knew she could lead me to explore her story through animation.

Animation is a very unique medium which allows complex ideas to be explored through multiple conscious layers, yet it can appear simple. The thoughts of basing an animated feature around this character, this environment, this complex set of circumstances, felt like something I had to take on.

There are few times in my career I’ve felt so certain about something — this film is quite special to me. And it’s special to the crew who worked on it, too.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Nt: I didn’t set out to leave the audience with a message. I think if I had taken that approach, I would have failed miserably. A filmmaker doesn’t make messages — they make stories and audiences interpret those stories. I think how each member of the audience experiences a film or a story can depend on what they bring to it.

As we worked through the story process, I thought of every character in this film as my child, my husband, my brother, myself. The film says different things to different people, we layered the story in a way so that children would be aware of different aspects than what adults would be aware of.

I think that approach has been successful and adults are often upset about what they think children will feel rather than what the children actually experience watching a film. During the making of the film, we did test screenings after which the children generally came out chatting while the adults were red-eyed and silent.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Nt: I had three big challenges: I didn’t get to go to Afghanistan so I had to rely on frequent consultations with Afghan people to try to be as authentic as possible to the subject matter. I had to do a lot of research and a lot of back and forth, trying to understand a culture, a history, and a people who were not my own.

At the end of the day, I concentrated on the things every culture has in common; we all worry about our children, we all find rituals in our day that give us a sense of normality, we all do what we can to get through life in one piece. That makes the story universal.

I also wanted to make sure that the characters and the drama of this film felt epic, that the beauty of the animation would make the film hard to turn away from. I wanted the character to feel more real than if they were live-action. Having an incredibly talented cast and crew made this second challenge a huge thrill — I can’t believe the beauty of the animation, landscapes, score, and sound design they all achieved.

Thirdly, I found out I had breast cancer in the last year of four years of film development and production. I went through chemo, surgery, and radiation while working on the film. I couldn’t give the work up, it meant too much to me, so I hung on and I finished treatment two months before the final mix was completed.

I had the support of the team behind me, they didn’t bat an eyelid when I walked into meetings with painted on eyebrows or muddled up my scene numbers because of “chemo brain.” The crew made it possible for me to work with an unorthodox approach to the final year of animation production.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Nt: Ok, you asked: The film was funded by the film boards of Luxembourg, Canada, and Ireland, a number of tax breaks from each of the co-producing countries, investment from Bai, Gaia Entertainment, Shaw Rocket Fund, Artemis Rising Foundation, Ontario Media Development Corporation, The Harold Greenberg Fund, RTÉ, The Movie Network, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and Gkids.

This is what my creative partner Paul Young calls “Franken-finance,” where you scrape every cent together from the least amount of sources and try to build the budget. We are lucky in Ireland, Canada, and Luxembourg that our governments support projects like “The Breadwinner” and encourage co-productions between our countries. Producers on a co-produced Indie really have to earn their crust as you can imagine how much coordination goes into closing a film with this many partners.

From the U.S., Mimi Polk Gitlin came on as an executive producer for this film. She produced “Thelma and Louise,” which was a formative film for me, so having Mimi’s support on “The Breadwinner” meant a lot. Angelina Jolie also came on as an executive producer and her guidance was a great help throughout the process.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Nt: Toronto is where we found our cast, where we recorded them at Wanted! Sound + Picture, where we did all the film’s compositing with Guru Studio, our grading and mixing at Technicolor. Aircraft Pictures, our co-production partners, are based here and I have such a strong connection to the city because of this film.

It is the most fitting premiere for “The Breadwinner” and I’m truly delighted. We premiered “Song of the Sea” at Tiff a few years ago and that was very special. I absolutely love Tiff, and the Tiff Bell Lightbox theater where I recently saw the brilliant “Lady Macbeth” by Irish producer Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Nt: I hate being told I can’t do something. Even if I don’t want to, I’ll be compelled to do something if someone says I can’t. I left school at 15 and one of the teachers tried to scare me into coming back by listing all the things I couldn’t do without that qualification.

I have qualified in many areas since school but never got my graduation certificate. If you’re determined, you’ll make your own way in life.

My husband gave me the best advice (after I kept nagging him for his opinions) and that was to trust my instincts. I tend to undermine my own decisions by looking at things from every conceivable angle, so I try to remember to listen to my gut.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Nt: Don’t ask for permission and don’t wait for the “right time” for anything.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Nt: I love “Archipelago” by Joanna Hogg. It’s a film about a dysfunctional family on holiday and, honestly, I keep referring to it when I’m trying to work out how to be subtle about human relationships and about letting your audience come forward and fill in the blanks on the screen. She’s a phenomenal filmmaker who does things on her own terms and is incredibly talented.

I also love Lotte Reiniger, a German animator who made the world’s oldest surviving animated feature, “The Adventures of Prince Achmed” — which is featured at Tiff this year.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Nt: In animation at least, I think there is great hope.

I recently gave a lecture at a French college where in a class of 20 animation directing students, only two were male. I asked the tutors why this was the case and they said the standard of work from young women coming up was such that they struggled to include young men.

I think animation in particular, being a medium whereby one might direct a project for a number of years rather than a number of months, means these women coming through will change the culture of the workplace. Making more space for women and men who want a better work/life balance.

I have also noticed that young women coming up through the ranks in animation are more confident than I would have been at their age. I have been door-stopped by young women asking questions about directing and I think this is a really positive change. It didn’t happen 10 years ago, and I didn’t do it 20 years ago.

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Nora Twomey — “The Breadwinner” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Lyra H.

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James Cameron Needs to Sit Down and Take a Lesson From 1 of the Most Iconic Films Made For Women

1 September 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Now that James Cameron has mansplained to all of us why his concept of a female heroine is better than Wonder Woman, I'd like to return the favor and womansplain something to him: the best way to tell stories about people unlike yourself may be to realize what you don't know and listen to people who do. That's one reason why Wonder Woman, with its female director and star, spoke to a massive female audience, and that's also how it played out in the making of one of Hollywood's most iconic films starring women up to now, Thelma & Louise. Written by a woman, first-time screenwriter Callie Khouri, and starring two women, Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis, Thelma & Louise created the sensation it did back in 1991 because it was so clearly a story that emerged straight from the heart of an actual female, addressing issues that drive females crazy in their actual lives. »

- Becky Aikman

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Why Geena Davis Shouldn’t Be Cast in Wonder Woman 2

24 August 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Word on the street is that Geena Davis wants a part in Wonder Woman 2.  Let’s just stop right there.  Geena Davis is a PG-rated actress. It doesn’t matter that she’s been in films that have a harder rating, she isn’t the type that could fit into an action film of the day and be completely seamless in her delivery. The Long Kiss Goodnight and A League of Their Own is about as fringe as she gets to be honest and that’s where she needs to stay. Thelma and Louise was a stretch but any further and her character would

Why Geena Davis Shouldn’t Be Cast in Wonder Woman 2 »

- Wake

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Netflix's What Happened to Monday Changed 1 Giant Detail So Noomi Rapace Could Star

18 August 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday - days of the week, sure, but also cinema's latest female ass-kickers du jour in What Happened to Monday, Netflix's brutal, bloody sci-fi romp starring Noomi Rapace. The Swedish actress stars in the streaming network's dystopian action flick, out Aug. 18, as identical septuplets named after each day of the week. All seven sisters have grown up living in hiding thanks to the government's law restricting families to one child only due to overpopulation, so their grandfather (Willem Dafoe) allows them out of the house only on the day corresponding with their name. They're able to maintain one public identity through adulthood, until a government agency led by the steely Glenn Close picks up on the scam. Monday doesn't return home after her day out, and soon enough her sisters savagely work their way through a long line of agents (and end up »

- Quinn Keaney

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Susan Sarandon to Receive Woodstock Film Festival Maverick Award

17 August 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Susan Sarandon: Sarandon’s Twitter account

Activist and Academy Award winner Susan Sarandon will be honored with the Maverick Award this year at the Woodstock Film Festival, the Daily Freeman reports.

According to the festival’s press release, the Maverick Award is annually presented to those “who demonstrate a fiercely independent and unparalled artistic vision.”

Meira Blaustein, Woodstock’s co-founder and executive director, has expressed that Sarandon’s appeal lies not only in her extensive acting accomplishments — a career that spans over 60 years — but also in her advocacy for “many socially relevant, impactful films and gender equality in the entertainment industry.”

Sarandon has served as an executive producer on multiple projects. Her recent credits include Alexandra Dean’s “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story,” a documentary that explores Lamarr’s accomplishments as both an actress and technological inventor. “Bombshell” screened at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival and was acquired by Zietgeist Films and Kino Lorber. The film will screen at Woodstock in celebration of Sarandon’s career.

Alongside “Thelma and Louise” co-star Geena Davis, Sarandon received Kering’s “Women in Motion” award at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. She was nominated for a 2017 Emmy for portraying one of Hollywood’s original female game-changers, Bette Davis, in FX’s “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

The 18th annual Woodstock Film Festival will be held October 11–15 in London. For tickets and information, visit the festival website.

Susan Sarandon to Receive Woodstock Film Festival Maverick Award was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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Leslie Jones Is Dying to Kiss Who?

14 August 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Pucker up! Leslie Jones has a list of who in Hollywood she wants to smooch.

“I could kiss more than one celebrity right now at this moment,” the Saturday Night Live star, 49, tells People in this week’s Emmy portfolio saluting the funniest people in late night. “I’m a multi-celebrity type girl.”

Taking the No. 1 spot is The Blacklist’s James Spader.

“I would so kiss him right now,” the outstanding supporting actress in a comedy series nominee says.

Next up: People’s two-time Sexiest Man Alive Brad Pitt. “I would kiss him like they did in Thelma and Louise, »

- Dana Rose Falcone

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Fantasia 2017: Tragedy Girls Review: Dir. Tyler MacIntyre (2017)

29 July 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Tragedy Girls Review: Two best friends find their friendship tested as their desire for internet stardom puts them face-to-face with a local maniac. Tragedy Girls Review

McKayla and Sadie are Bff’s with a disturbing social media obsession. Determined to be ‘instafamous’, the girls run a blog about a local string of gruesome murders. After realising that their follower count is low, the pair track down the serial killer and take matters into their own hands, generating a furry of deaths that get the whole town talking, but is fame really worth all this work?

Usually a teen slasher movie would feature a teenage girl as the prime choice of victim, Tragedy Girls spins that convention on its head, the girls being the hunters. It’s a refreshing angle on a tried and tested genre, and injects some much needed newness. But that’s not where the innovation stops, there »

- Kat Hughes

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‘Descendants 2’: How This Long-Running Female Writing Team Came Up With One of Disney’s Most Important Franchises

21 July 2017 3:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

When Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon first teamed up 32 years ago, the door had just started to crack open for female film writers.

“We came at the right time, it was right when women writers were coming into vogue,” McGibbon said. “It was the time of ‘Thelma and Louise’ and there was two of us — a blonde and a brunette and it all fell into place.”

Parriott and McGibbon’s latest project, “Descendants 2,” premieres Friday night on Disney Channel, as well as ABC, Freeform, Disney Xd and Lifetime. It’s now a key franchise for Disney, and the latest career twist for Parriott and McGibbon, who now boast one of the longest-running writing partnerships in all of Hollywood.

Read MoreAt D23, Disney Showed Off Its Mighty Star Wars, Marvel, and Pixar Muscle — Full Report

The duo initially chose film over TV because “we felt in success we could still »

- Michael Schneider

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‘Descendants 2’: How This Long-Running Female Writing Team Came Up With One of Disney’s Most Important Franchises

21 July 2017 3:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When Sara Parriott and Josann McGibbon first teamed up 32 years ago, the door had just started to crack open for female film writers.

“We came at the right time, it was right when women writers were coming into vogue,” McGibbon said. “It was the time of ‘Thelma and Louise’ and there was two of us — a blonde and a brunette and it all fell into place.”

Parriott and McGibbon’s latest project, “Descendants 2,” premieres Friday night on Disney Channel, as well as ABC, Freeform, Disney Xd and Lifetime. It’s now a key franchise for Disney, and the latest career twist for Parriott and McGibbon, who now boast one of the longest-running writing partnerships in all of Hollywood.

Read MoreAt D23, Disney Showed Off Its Mighty Star Wars, Marvel, and Pixar Muscle — Full Report

The duo initially chose film over TV because “we felt in success we could still »

- Michael Schneider

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Brad Pitt’s Top 7 Performances

19 July 2017 4:24 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Brad Pitt is one of the most confident actors of this day and he’s well known for a long list of memorable parts, like the extreme killer in Killing them Softly, the hardened eccentric living on the edge of society in Fight Club, and the frustrated father in Tree of Life. He’s a brilliant actor, he takes on the role of different characters exceptionally well, and that’s why he’s continually cast in more top-notch films. Below are seven of Pitt’s top acting performances, and fittingly enough one of them is in the film Se7en.

Martin Schoeller/ Corbis Outline

Thelma and Louise – 1991

Brad Pitt plays a smooth talking robber in his brief role as J.D. in Thelma and Louise. Sure he eventually robs Thelma after getting her to fall in love with him, but up until that point he’s highly charismatic, and manages to »

- Paul Heath

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SeriesFest 2017: 8 Great Pilots That Deserve to Find a Network Home

6 July 2017 3:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The world of independent television remains a complicated one with no easy path to success, but many creators are finding that the best way to sell their visions is to make the pilots themselves. And a festival like SeriesFest, held last week in Denver, Colorado, can be a powerful opportunity to put that vision on display.

Read More: SeriesFest 2017 Awards: Prison Drama ‘Up North’ Leads Winners

From reality-soaked drama to heartfelt comedy to genre fare, the range of projects was remarkable. IndieWire took note of the promising projects while attending the festival, and the eight below are the ones which stood out immediately as potentially ready for wider exposure.

“Up North”

Network That Should Buy It: HBO

[SeriesFest Award Winner: Best Drama, Best Directing of a Drama, Best Actor, Audience Award] A tonal cousin to “The Wire,” but with an intimate and personal core to it, the heart of “Up North” is centered around an innocent teenager arrested for a crime he didn’t »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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SeriesFest 2017: 8 Great Pilots That Deserve to Find a Network Home

6 July 2017 3:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The world of independent television remains a complicated one with no easy path to success, but many creators are finding that the best way to sell their visions is to make the pilots themselves. And a festival like SeriesFest, held last week in Denver, Colorado, can be a powerful opportunity to put that vision on display.

Read More: SeriesFest 2017 Awards: Prison Drama ‘Up North’ Leads Winners

From reality-soaked drama to heartfelt comedy to genre fare, the range of projects was remarkable. IndieWire took note of the promising projects while attending the festival, and the eight below are the ones which stood out immediately as potentially ready for wider exposure.

“Up North”

Network That Should Buy It: HBO

[SeriesFest Award Winner: Best Drama, Best Directing of a Drama, Best Actor, Audience Award] A tonal cousin to “The Wire,” but with an intimate and personal core to it, the heart of “Up North” is centered around an innocent teenager arrested for a crime he didn’t »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Brad Pitt in Thelma and Louise: Inside the Making of One of Hollywood’s Steamiest Sex Scenes

27 June 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Before fame propelled Brad Pitt above the heights of the Hollywood sign, he was an overly polite, amateur actor who was almost passed over for the role of the seducer-meets-robber J.D. in the 1991 film Thelma and Louise. Now, a new book reveals inside details of his sex scene with Thelma (played by Geena Davis) — a scene so “racy” that it kick-started his reputation as a sex symbol and, if left uncut, would have shot the movie’s rating “past R.”

The young Pitt wasn’t director Ridley Scott’s first (or even second) choice, Becky Aikman reveals in her book, »

- Sam Gillette

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Gop Sen. Pat Roberts Compares Health Care to Thelma And Louise

22 June 2017 8:41 AM, PDT | Mediaite - TV | See recent Mediaite - TV news »

After emerging from a closed door meeting regarding Republican Senator's  new health care bill, revealed on Thursday, Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas compared the current health care system to Thelma and Louise driving their car off a cliff. »

- Aidan McLaughlin

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Joseph Fiennes Reflects On Losing A Main Star Wars Role

25 May 2017 6:51 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

It seems that every successful actor has a near-miss story when it comes to auditions, and they can often provide an amusing glimpse into not only what might have been, but also the decision-making processes used to cast important roles. Infamous examples include the time that George Clooney tried for the role of J.D in Thelma And Louise – which ultimately went to Brad Pitt – and Joe Manganiello reaching the final stage of casting for the role of Superman in Man Of Steel. The most recent revelation in this arena comes from Joseph Fiennes, and it concerns Star Wars.

Speaking to The Wrap about his new television show The Handmaid’s Tale, Fiennes explained what happened when he tried to become a Jedi.

“I auditioned for a great director. It was whittled down after many auditions to myself and another fine actor who I was at that time at drama school with. »

- Sarah Myles

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We Need To Talk About Ridley: The essential problem with the new Alien movie

18 May 2017 4:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Is it best when Ridley Scott is tethered to a well-constructed source? On the basis of his new Alien movie, Sean Wilson thinks this could well be the case…

There’s a lot to admire about Alien: Covenant, Ridley Scott’s gore-strewn return to the sci-fi horror franchise he kickstarted back in 1979. As a piece of visual, physical spectacle it’s extraordinary: visually elegant and sleek, never going in for cheap shocks but fully engaging us in an otherworldly atmosphere. It’s what we’ve come to expect from the world-builder responsible for the original Alien, Blade Runner, Gladiator and countless other handsome spectacles. As a piece of storytelling however, it’s an altogether different proposition, more on which momentarily.

Sadly it appears that Scott, who it goes without saying is one of cinema’s truly great visionaries, has past form in this area. In particular, the quality of Scott »

- Sean Wilson

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Ridley Scott: ‘Alien: Covenant’ Is a ‘Thinking Man’s Scary Movie’

17 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ridley Scott has one goal with his new movie, “Alien: Covenant.”

“I’m hoping to scare the s–t out of you,” says the legendary director. “If I don’t, I’m in trouble.”

If the past 40 years are any indication, the odds are in Scott’s favor. Since entering the movie game later in life — he was 40 when his debut feature “The Duellists” came out in 1977 — Scott has been taking audiences on wild rides with such films as “Alien,” its prequel “Prometheus” and, most recently, with the Academy Award-nominated blockbuster “The Martian.” Along the way, he’s racked up four Oscar nominations, won two Emmy Awards and landed a permanent place in the film zeitgeist with groundbreaking movies including  “Blade Runner,” “Thelma and Louise” and “Gladiator.”

This week, Scott will earn another honor when his hands and feet are encased in cement outside the Chinese Theatre on May 17. Though »

- Jenelle Riley

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Cannes 2017: Women in Motion to Honor Isabelle Huppert and Maysaloun Hamoud

16 May 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Isabelle Huppert is the face of Women in Motion 2017: Kering

The face of this year’s Women in Motion program is also the winner of its top prize. In partnership with Cannes, Kering will present the 2017 Women in Motion Award to Isabelle Huppert. The news comes after the “Elle” actress was named the official face of the third annual Women in Motion program.

Isabelle Huppert has taken many artistic risks in her career, and whilst acting with leading names, she has successfully established her own style in a variety of registers ranging from drama to comedy. She has pushed back boundaries with the strong and far-from-stereotypical roles that she has played since the early days of her career,” a press announcement details.

As part of the honor, Huppert had the opportunity to select the recipient of the annual Young Talents Award. She named writer-director Maysaloun Hamoud, who will receive €50,000 (about $54,800 Usd) to help finance future projects. Hamoud made her feature directorial debut with “In Between” (“Bar Bahar”), a drama centering on three Palestinian women living in Tel Aviv.

“The free-spirited and joyful women that [Hamoud] portrays, torn between their desire for emancipation and the traditions that sometimes stifle them, are true heroines of our time,” Huppert emphasized in a statement.

Last year, the Women in Motion Award was presented to Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon. The “Thelma and Louise” stars chose Leyla Bouzid (“As I Open My Eyes”), Gaya Jiji (“Matin, midi, soir… et matin), and Ida Panahandeh (“Nahid”) for the Young Talents prize. The inaugural event saw Jane Fonda receiving the Women in Motion Award and selecting producer Megan Ellison (“Zero Dark Thirty”) as the Young Talents recipient.

Kering has also announced plans to team up with UniFrance in an effort to expand Women in Motion. According to Variety, the partnership “marks a key step forward” for the program. It will now have a stronger global presence and will be part of film events year-round. The alliance between Kering and UniFrance officially begins during the Cannes Film Festival. UniFrance managing director Isabelle Giordano is set to host a Women in Motion panel at the fest. After that, Women in Motion will be featured at UniFrance’s French Film Festival in Japan, which runs June 22–25 in Tokyo.

Cannes Film Festival will be held May 17–28. Check out our by-the-numbers fest breakdown here.

Cannes 2017: Women in Motion to Honor Isabelle Huppert and Maysaloun Hamoud was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Rachel Montpelier

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Isabelle Huppert Honored With Cannes Women in Motion Award

15 May 2017 10:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Isabelle Huppert, Oscar-nommed this year for “Elle,” will be honored with the Women in Motion Award by Kering and the Cannes Film Festival. Huppert also won a Golden Globe for the Paul Verhoeven film.

Huppert has in turn chosen Palestinian director Maysaloun Hamoud for the Young Talents award, which comes with a $55,000 grant. Hamoud’s film “In Between” tells the story of three young Palestinian women living in Tel Aviv.

“Things evolve slowly, and never enough. Since women continue to be confronted each day with countless obstacles, I am delighted and moved to be able to shine a spotlight on the talent of one of today’s most promising female directors, Maysaloun Hamoud, through the 2017 Women in Motion Young Talents Award. The free-spirited and joyful women that she portrays, torn between their desire for emancipation and the traditions that sometimes stifle them, are true heroines of our time,” Huppert said in a statement. »

- Pat Saperstein

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Alien: Covenant (2017): Ridley Scott Says Sequel Will Start Shooting Within 14 Months

9 May 2017 8:13 PM, PDT | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

James Cameron Announces Shooting On The Alien: Covenant Sequel Will Start In 14 Months Academy Award-nominated Thelma and Louise director Ridley Scott reveals that production will begin on the planned sequel to Alien: Covenant within the next 14 months. The news will certainly come as a welcome surprise to fans of the iconic science fiction franchise. [...]

Continue reading: Alien: Covenant (2017): Ridley Scott Says Sequel Will Start Shooting Within 14 Months »

- Reggie Peralta

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