The Silence of the Lambs
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 217 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema

5 hours ago | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Cai Ross

The summer movie season of 1992 opened under a cloud; a dark cloud from the still-smouldering buildings that had burned to the ground during the La riots in April. Racial tension after the disastrous acquittal of Rodney King’s uniformed attackers had reached an all-time high and Hollywood appealed for calm.

Thus, in a touchingly bold demonstration of selfless generosity, Walter Hill’s unremarkable urban thriller, The Looters, was hastily withdrawn and held back until Christmas, re-christened Trespass (memorably starring two Bills – Paxton and Sadler – and a pair of Ices – T and Cube). Elsewhere, it was business as usual.

The Rodney King affair was briefly alluded to in Lethal Weapon 3, the second-biggest hit of the summer and one of only a handful of ‘sure things’ on the menu. Though there were mutterings about the dominance of sequels in the summer movie season, there were weird things afoot in most of the other returnees. Aside from Lethal Weapon 3 – which was essentially a watered down Lethal Weapon 2 with too much added Joe Pesci – the rest of the sequels veered off into strange tangents, with varying results.

Alien 3, for example strayed dangerously far from the template set down by the first two classics. Bravely, it has to be said, David Fincher tried to create a quasi-religious epic, following Scott’s horror movie and Cameron’s war film. Latterly, Fincher’s frustrations and behind-the-scenes interferences became legendary, but audiences didn’t click with his compromised vision and it became the first in a long line of Alien movies to fall a bit flat.

Another major sequel, Honey, I Blew Up The Baby was in fact the complete opposite of 1989’s Honey, I Shrunk The Kids, culminating in the spectacle of a 99 foot toddler stomping through Las Vegas. It was directed without enthusiasm by Grease director Randal Kleiser, reminding audiences once again why no one remembers who directed Grease.

It wasn’t just sequels that dared to be different. One of the strangest mainstream offerings of the year was Robert Zemeckis’s black comedy, Death Becomes Her, which might have been a delicious satire on America’s vain obsession with cosmetic surgery if only Bruce Willis had stopped shouting at everyone like he was trying to prevent a plane crash.

Back in the ‘90s, much more so than today, comedies were a vital part of the summer success story – an inexpensive sop for the grown-ups while their teenage kids watched things explode in Screen 7. There were high hopes for Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn’s Housesitter, which was only a medium-sized hit, despite the bit where Steve Martin sings ‘Tura Lura Lura’ to his dad, and the other bit when his falls over his couch.

Boomerang was a bigger hit and restored some credibility to Eddie Murphy’s career after the crippling one-two punches of Harlem Nights and Another 48 Hours. It was also responsible for one of the great ironic ‘First Dance At a Wedding’ songs, Boys II Men’s The End of The Road.

Nicolas Cage embarked on a three year long career as a romantic comedy star with the rather wonderful Honeymoon in Vegas, famed for its skydiving Elvis finale. Tom Hanks and his Big director Penny Marshall reteamed to great success with wartime baseball comedy A League of Their Own, which also saw Geena Davis giving a star performance and Madonna giving a bearable one. “There’s no crying in baseball!!!” was probably the most quoted line of the summer.

As with City Slickers in 1991, comedy provided the biggest sleeper hit of the summer: Sister Act, with Whoopi Goldberg excelling as a murder witness hiding out in a convent. As with City Slickers, an unwise sequel was hastily made and hastily forgotten. The original though, was the sixth biggest film of the year and is still going strong as a west-end show to this day.

It wasn’t just the many and varied comic tastes of adults that were appeased; semi-literate young people were also provided for by Encino Man (or California Man as we knew it, since we don’t know where Encino is. It’s in California). Noted for Brendan Fraser’s first stab at the big time, this grungy caveman caper will be of interest to young contemporary archeologists keen to investigate who or what Pauly Shore was.

Teenagers were also palmed off with a silly-sounding comedy called Buffy The Vampire Slayer, written by first-time screenwriter Joss Whedon. Starring Kristy Swanson as the eponymous heroine, but marketed as a vehicle for Beverly Hills 90210 heart-throb Luke Perry, the producers had hoped for a chunk of the Bill & Ted audience that Encino Man hadn’t swallowed up. Sadly, they had to make do with a long-running spin-off television show regularly cited as one of the greatest ever made. Gnarly.

The stalking killer thriller phenomenon that started with The Silence of The Lambs and Cape Fear echoed into 1992 with solid hits like Unlawful Entry and Single White Female. Even Patriot Games – a sort-of sequel to The Hunt For Red October with Harrison Ford rebooting Alec Baldwin’s Jack Ryan – for all its CIA espionage and partial understanding of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, was basically a slasher movie, with Sean Bean doing to Harrison Ford what Robert De Niro had done to Nick Nolte the year before. (Sean Bean dies, obviously).

Crimes against the Emerald Isle weren’t restricted to the gratuitous amounts of Clannad in Patriot Games. Tom Cruise’s Irish accent in Ron Howard’s Far and Away was the benchmark for all bad Irish accents until Brad Pitt graciously took the relay baton in The Devil’s Own. The film, shot in glorious 70mm was the biggest risk of the summer and proved to be the dampest squib, considering the star power of Cruise and (then-wife) Nicole Kidman. Despite looking ravishing, the script had all the depth of a bottle-cap.  It desperately wanted to be a timeless classic in the David Lean tradition but held up against Unforgiven, which was released in August, Far & Away was shown up as the glorified Cbbc TV special it was.

Unforgiven came out of nowhere. Clint Eastwood’s previous movie, The Rookie, was somehow even worse than 1989’s Pink Cadillac. However, he’d been sitting on David Webb Peoples’ script for years until he was finally old enough to play William Munny. An extraordinary, mature and masterful critique of Western mythology, Unforgiven was hailed as Eastwood’s best work from the get-go, took the summer’s number five spot and would later win a handful of Oscars, including Pest Picture.

So who was the box office champion of Summer ’92? Well, that question was never in any doubt. Tim Burton’s Batman was the cultural phenomenon of 1989, redefining the parameters of box office limitations and merchandise licensing in a way not seen since Star Wars. Speculation as to who Batman would fight next and who would play him/her began immediately. Dustin Hoffman was touted to play The Penguin and Annette Bening was actually cast as Catwoman, before pregnancy forced her to drop out.

On the 19th of June, all was revealed when Batman Returns opened to a spectacular $45m weekend, $5m more than the original. Michael Keaton returned as The Caped Crusader (having split up with the creditably tight-lipped Vicki Vale), while not one but three villains put up their dukes. Danny DeVito played the Penguin as a deformed, subterranean leader of a gang of circus act drop-outs. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman (perhaps her signature role) was transformed from a clumsy secretary into a vengeful whip-wielding dominatrix. Christopher Walken borrowed ‘DocEmmett Brown’s hair to play new villain, Max Shreck.

Despite the enormous opening weekend, things took a downward turn almost immediately. Audiences expecting more of the same were treated to a dark, nose-bitingly violent combination of German Expressionism, kinky S&M and oversized rubber ducks. The box office the following week dropped by 40%, and there was further controversy when McDonalds had to deal with the ire of horrified parents across America, ‘tricked’ by their Batman Returns Happy Meals into taking their kids to watch Burton’s deranged fairy tale, pussy jokes et al.

The backlash (against what is now considered a unique high-water mark in the superhero genre), meant that Batman Returns wound up making $100m less than its predecessor and it placed third for the year, behind Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, a film so determined to give its audience a familiar experience that it simply changed the first film’s screen directions from Int. Kevin’S House – Night to Ext. New York – Night and reshot the entire script. (The box office crown for the year was taken eventually by Disney’s Aladdin.)

Warner Bros. took evasive action, hiring Joel Schumacher to sweeten the mix, which would help to restore Batman’s fortunes in 1995, before everything, literally absolutely everything went wrong in 1997 and the world had to wait for Christopher Nolan to finish attending Ucl, become a director and save the Dark Knight from the resultant ignominy.

Hollywood was given a crash course in the perils of straying too far from a winning formula in the summer of ’92. Sadly, for a while at least, it learned its lesson.

The post Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Cai Ross

Permalink | Report a problem


Jurassic World 2 officially titled Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom; new poster revealed

22 June 2017 8:13 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

With just one year before it’s officially released, it has been revealed that Jurassic World 2 will be titled Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Not only that, but we got a brand new poster! Check it out here…

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is set for release on June 22nd, 2018 and sees J.A. Bayona directing a cast that includes franchise veterans Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Bd Wong and Jeff Goldblum alongside Toby Jones (Captain America: The First Avenger), Rafe Spall (Black Mirror), Justice Smith (The Get Down), Ted Levine (Silence of the Lambs), James Cromwell (The Young Pope), Daniella Pineda (The Detour) and Geraldine Chaplin (A Monster Calls). »

- Luke Owen

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Review: Transformers: The Last Knight

22 June 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

I’ll get this out of the way now: Transformers: The Last Knight is by far the worst movie of the year, and quite possibly, of the last few years. It’s headache inducing, overlong, incomprehensible, and offensive. I would say that this movie was edited for children who couldn’t keep their attention span focused for more than five seconds, but based on some of the film’s “humor” and language, I wouldn’t recommend any kid seeing this movie. Director Michael Bay has outdone himself here, and this is after I honestly thought the Transformers series could not get any worse after the dreadful Age of Extinction. The new film may be called The Last Knight, but it should also be Bay’s last movie.

I should also mention that I am not a Transformers hater. The first installment came out when I was in the seventh grade and it instantly became one of my favorite movies. Over the years, I have come to accept that it is not a perfect movie, but it is still fun and holds up remarkably well. I was crushed by how awful the second installment, Revenge of the Fallen, was and had given up on the series. The Dark of the Moon was a slight improvement, and you already know my feelings on the fourth film. So, the first film came out at the right age for me and I still love to watch it, but later installments have left me questioning why I ever loved this series in the first place. The Last Knight has left me questioning how we’ve allowed Michael Bay to direct movies for this long.

The Last Knight features the Knights of the Round Table, an evil Optimus Prime, Stonehenge, a re-designed Megatron, an organization called the Trf, and Stanley Tucci as Merlin in a plot so ridiculously convoluted and complicated that makes it Game of Thrones seem as straightforward as a child’s bedtime story. Humans and Transformers are currently not on good terms as humans consider their once robotic allies dangerous, probably because they keep blowing up the planet. Transformers keep falling from the sky in droves and this makes humans wary of another attack. Optimus Prime, who was last seen floating off into space looking for the Creators at the end of Age of Extinction, returns home to Cybertron where he is seduced by Quintessa to help bring an end to the “human race.” There’s a MacGuffin (like there always is in a summer blockbuster) that both humans and robots want that leads to a third-act showdown. There was a lot of chatter the past couple of weeks about The Last Knight’s rumored runtime of 182 minutes long. While that is untrue (the real runtime is 149 minutes) the movie feels like it is well over three hours long. There’s too much going on, featuring too many characters, and too many subplots. I didn’t even mention Sir Anthony Hopkin’s storyline or the main female protagonist’s arc, mainly because it is too convoluted to matter and everything just ends up being blown up so why should anyone care?

This should come as no surprise to anyone who has seen his movies, but director Michael Bay wastes no screen time to develop his stories and even less to develop characters. Bay and his editors think that any shot that doesn’t involve a car transforming into a robot or some other shot with action will bore the audience, which shows their lack of faith in their story and characters. Bay is compelled to bombard the audience with kinetic shots because he knows if the movie stops long enough for people to think about it, it won’t make any sense. This makes for an exhausting experience that is equivalent to being repeatedly bludgeoned on the head with a boombox. It’s nonstop, loud, and makes for a miserable experience. Oh, and the aspect ratio adds to the misery. Someone should explain to Bay what an aspect ratio is.

It’s easy to put most of the blame on Bay, but some needs to get passed onto the film’s writers as well. There’s three credited screenwriters and you can tell that this is a story that was developed by a group rather than a single person. There’s a real difference between movies like this and something like, say, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. That movie was written (and directed) by James Gunn and his unique humor and style are all over that movie. There is no such sense of style or artisanship present anywhere in The Last Knight, which is fine, if it were just entertaining and not offensive. Bay has gotten in trouble in the past over racist and sometimes sexist humor in his movies, but he seemingly doesn’t care. There is literally a scene where a group of women, including her mother, beg Laura Haddock’s character to stop being so smart and just find a guy to date. They refer to her work as unimportant and the only value she will have in life will be determined by who she marries. It’s embarrassing that this movie will be shown on the same screens as Wonder Woman was a couple weeks ago. That movie featured powerful women who were independent and can serve as role models for young girls. In The Last Knight, Bay has a women telling a young woman that her only worth is in finding a man to marry and she should abandon her life’s work. Just imagine Diana Prince putting up with that.

Notice that throughout my bashing of this film, I have not come close to mentioning Mark Wahlberg’s portrayal of Cade Yeager. I am a moderate fan of Wahlberg and enjoy him in comedies like Ted or The Other Guys, but he was terribly miscast in Age of Extinction. He played a failed inventor on a farm, and while there is less farm time in The Last Knight, Wahlberg is just as awful here. It’s hard to blame him because the rest of the acting in the movie is similarly terrible. When Hopkins, who won an Oscar for less than 20 minutes of screen time in Silence of the Lambs, is yelling out profanities and looking at robots like a 12-year-old child, you know it is because of poor filmmaking. Bay has no idea how to convey this ridiculous story, humor, or possibly even worse, his action. The actors are just screaming over the film’s obnoxious volume and none of them ever present any real sense of danger. With all the ridiculousness going around the characters, you would think that Bay would like to add some suspense by putting someone in actual danger. Nope. Instead, we get sweeping shots of Autobots and Decepticons throwing bombs and ammunition at each other. There’s not much any actor can do with that.

It’s become easy to bash the Transformers series at this point, because Paramount could care less what kind of product the series produces. All they see is that Age of Extinction made over a billion dollars worldwide and the global audience wants more of the same. There is no need to invest in writers who develop an interesting story, editors who string together shots that make sense, actors who do more than scream, or more importantly, a director with a more interesting vision. The Last Knight is being confusingly marketed as the last chapter in the Transformers series, which we know is not true because studios love money. This is not only Bay’s last movie (supposedly), but Wahlberg also said he won’t be returning, which is probably the best decision of his career. In the end, Transformers: The Last Knight is the worst kind of summer blockbuster experience, and after Age of Extinction, I was looking for a reason to be back on board Team Bay, but I don’t see myself ever being a Bay fan again. »

- Scott Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins talk Transformers: The Last Knight

21 June 2017 2:16 PM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins talk Transformers: The Last KnightMark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins talk Transformers: The Last KnightMelissa Sheasgreen6/21/2017 4:16:00 Pm

Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins are backstage at Caesars Palace’s Colosseum theatre in Las Vegas to talk about Transformers: The Last Knight.

Wahlberg (Boogie Nights, The Fighter, Lone Survivor) arrives first, very casual, to what’s essentially a converted dressing room, and Hopkins (Silence of the Lambs, Thor, TV’s Westworld) follows. The two joke around as they set up for the interview.

Sir Anthony is new to the film franchise based on the Hasbro/Tomy toys that convert from cars to alien robots and back again. He plays Sir Edmund Burton, a historian with important information about the Transformers’ time on Earth, while Wahlberg reprises his role of Cade Yeager, the mechanic who came to the aid of the Autobots (the good robots) in 2014’s Transformers: Age of Extinction. Michael Bay is once again at the helm.

This time, Yeager leaves his family to search for information that will save the relationship between humans and Autobots and, in turn, save the world.

Cineplex: Where do we pick up?

Wahlberg: “Well, for me, when you meet Cade at the beginning of this film I’ve had to make a big decision and, basically, in order to give my daughter an attempt at a normal life I have to go on the run. So I leave everything that I know as far as home and family, I’m kind of hiding out in the desert and I get summoned by this gentleman’s character [points at Hopkins] and I get thrust into this world of basically trying to pursue and find some information in order to save the world and our relationship with the Autobots. It’s really a great kind of a fish out of water, me, thrust into this world in England with sophisticated, fancy-talking folks that like to make fun of me; Cade’s from Texas. And Cade’s a little taken by them as well.”

No pressure, just saving the world, right?

Wahlberg: “Well, this is what we do.”

And what about your character, Anthony?

Hopkins: “Well I play the kind of English lord, or knight, ancient family, that typical archetypal Englishman who sees Americans and is curious about them, never unfriendly.”

Wahlberg: “Kind of like a puppy.”

Hopkins: “Kind of like a puppy. Yes, these chaps, you know, very interesting these Americans. See, [in real life] I was raised with Americans as a kid during the war, because I’m that old, and so my dream was to come to America so I had an appreciation of that. So that’s part of my personality, and my character’s as well. I have the attention span of a gnat so I can’t describe the total scheme of the script to you because it’s so complicated to read.”

Wahlberg: “He’s really educating us on the origins of the Transformers, when they’re coming to our world, as well as the mythology, so it’s amazing to see him rattling off these amounts of dialogue and monologues pretty much effortlessly, and then to say that he has the attention span of a gnat is just him being humble because it was impressive. I’m one who really prides myself on being prepared and to see him show up like that and make everyone’s job a lot easier was impressive.”

Yeah, but as actors you need to do this every day all the time, right?

Hopkins: “Yeah, but you see, he [pointing at Wahlberg] does great stuff with improvising and I love that.”

Wahlberg: “Well, we had so much opportunity to really play around and there are so many laughs, and his character, I think what he brought to it too is he was just so excited to be there and his energy was really infectious and everybody kind of fed off of that and the humour and to see him say some of the things that he says are really going to get big, big laughs.”

Really?

Hopkins: “Sincerely, this sounds like such bull, but for me to be involved in an American movie, as I’ve been involved in many of them, especially in that ethos of English society and aristocracy and working with Michael Bay and Mark, it’s a great feeling because you get so bored watching serious movies and everything’s so boring and Michael Bay comes on set with Mark Wahlberg and you don’t have a chance to be bored, you just don’t have a chance, you have to keep up with it.”

Give me an example.

“There’s a wonderful moment when we’re at Stonehenge and Michael Bay comes into my trailer, and we were at Stonehenge, 5,000 years ago it was established, and there’s another Stonehenge that the art department had built down the road so they could blow up bombs and all that. So Michael comes into my trailer and says, ‘So we’re at the real Stonehenge, yeah?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah.’ And he said, ‘Ours is much better than theirs.’ [Laughs.] Only an American would say that…. That’s what I love about America and working with Americans. You don’t have time to be precious and holier than thou, too thoughtful, because it’s so boring, all that stuff [pretends to snore while Wahlberg laughs]. It’s true, I was watching PBS, classic movies, after four minutes, that’s it, bye.”

Does this mean you’re doing all your own stunts in this movie?

Hopkins: “Oh, I did all of my own stunts, didn’t I? [Turns to Wahlberg, joking.]”

Wahlberg: “Yeah. And even all that you’re saying is not deterring me from wanting to be English and be a knight.”

Hopkins: “He wants to be a knight. I’ll see what I can do with the queen.”

Wahlberg: “Thank you.”

What do you think will surprise audiences most about this movie?

Wahlberg: “That Mike was still able to create new and exciting and fresh elements to this story, and new characters, and making it more exciting and more interesting than the last.” Bigger action and better stunts?

Wahlberg: “Yup. And new characters, the whole thing.”

Hopkins: “It’s a well-written script, isn’t it?”

Wahlberg: “Yeah, it’s hard and frustrating not to give away the good bits of the story because there are so many twists and turns and things that people are really going to be surprised about.”

Melissa Sheasgreen is a content producer for the Cineplex Pre-Show.

Transformers: The Last Knight is now playing at Cineplex theatres. For tickets and showtimes, click here! »

- Melissa Sheasgreen

Permalink | Report a problem


Married To The Mob June 24th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

19 June 2017 2:46 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I feel like a virgin at a eunuch convention.”

Married To The Mob screens Friday, June 24th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the sixth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

In director Jonathan Demme’s 1988 comedy Married To The Mob, Michelle Pfeiffer stars as Angela Demarco, the widow of a recently “iced” Mob hit-man who moves from her garishly tacky Long Island home to start a new life for herself and her son, while being pursued by Mob boss Dean Stockwell and FBI man Matthew Modine. Married To The Mob has lots going for it including a very amusing script; offbeat characters; sudden sharp turns to unexpected violence, and a hilarious yet menacing, Oscar-nominated performance by Stockwell and and also by Mercedes Ruehl, as his jealous wife from hell, But Ms Pfeiffer steals the show easily. She perfectly nails Angela’s under-educated, »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Something Wild June 23rd at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

18 June 2017 5:14 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“You were right. I’m a rebel. I am! I just channeled my rebellion into the mainstream.”

Something Wild screens Friday, June 23rd at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the fifth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Director Jonathan Demme’s Something Wild (1986) more than lives up to its title. This rolicking, road trip melodrama about coincidences and happenstances features a slippery-fingered bohemian babe, a staid businessman, and a psychotic criminal on the lam. Charlie Driggs (Jeff Daniels) neglects to pay his bill one day, and a complete stranger, Lulu (Melanie Griffith) confronts him about it outside of the restaurant. Afterward, Lulu takes the hopelessly conventional Charlie on a wild ride that concludes with her handcuffing him to a bed in a sleazy motel and tearing off his clothes. Impulse prompts them to careen off with Charlie still wearing the cuffs. »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Colin Trevorrow talks Jurassic World sequel and Jeff Goldblum’s return as Ian Malcolm

18 June 2017 4:40 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Speaking to the Happy Sad Confused podcast to coincide with the release of his new film The Book of Henry, Jurassic World 2 producer and screenwriter Colin Trevorrow has been chatting about Jeff Goldblum’s return to the Jurassic Park franchise as Dr. Ian Malcolm, and how he went about writing the character and his dialogue in the upcoming sequel.

“You know, I did rely on [Michael] Crichton for a lot. I used a lot of Crichton dialogue. Maybe one of my highlights of this whole process is Goldblum. Jeff Goldblum called me – and I’m not going to do an impression – but he was like, ‘Look, I’ve added a couple of things, and I thought I’d perform it for you.’ [Laughs] Oh, great, okay. So, we sat on the phone for an hour as he ran these lines, and I talked about it. And, I mean, that’s – it was »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Battle of Britain: Interview with Transformers: The Last Knight's Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins

16 June 2017 9:19 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Battle of Britain: Interview with Transformers: The Last Knight's Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony HopkinsBattle of Britain: Interview with Transformers: The Last Knight's Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony HopkinsMelissa Sheasgreen6/16/2017 11:19:00 Am

Mark Wahlberg and Sir Anthony Hopkins are backstage at Caesars Palace’s Colosseum theatre in Las Vegas to talk about Transformers: The Last Knight.

Wahlberg (Boogie Nights, The Fighter, Lone Survivor) arrives first, very casual, to what’s essentially a converted dressing room, and Hopkins (Silence of the Lambs, Thor, TV’s Westworld) follows. The two joke around as they set up for the interview.

Sir Anthony is new to the film franchise based on the Hasbro/Tomy toys that convert from cars to alien robots and back again. He plays Sir Edmund Burton, a historian with important information about the Transformers’ time on Earth, while Wahlberg reprises his role of Cade Yeager, the mechanic who came to the aid of the Autobots (the good robots) in 2014’s Transformers: Age of Extinction. Michael Bay is once again at the helm.

This time, Yeager leaves his family to search for information that will save the relationship between humans and Autobots and, in turn, save the world.

Where do we pick up?

Wahlberg: “Well, for me, when you meet Cade at the beginning of this film I’ve had to make a big decision and, basically, in order to give my daughter an attempt at a normal life I have to go on the run. So I leave everything that I know as far as home and family, I’m kind of hiding out in the desert and I get summoned by this gentleman’s character [points at Hopkins] and I get thrust into this world of basically trying to pursue and find some information in order to save the world and our relationship with the Autobots. It’s really a great kind of a fish out of water, me, thrust into this world in England with sophisticated, fancy-talking folks that like to make fun of me; Cade’s from Texas. And Cade’s a little taken by them as well.”

No pressure, just saving the world, right?

Wahlberg: “Well, this is what we do.”

And what about your character, Anthony?

Hopkins: “Well I play the kind of English lord, or knight, ancient family, that typical archetypal Englishman who sees Americans and is curious about them, never unfriendly.”

Wahlberg: “Kind of like a puppy.”

Hopkins: “Kind of like a puppy. Yes, these chaps, you know, very interesting these Americans. See, [in real life] I was raised with Americans as a kid during the war, because I’m that old, and so my dream was to come to America so I had an appreciation of that. So that’s part of my personality, and my character’s as well. I have the attention span of a gnat so I can’t describe the total scheme of the script to you because it’s so complicated to read.”

Wahlberg: “He’s really educating us on the origins of the Transformers, when they’re coming to our world, as well as the mythology, so it’s amazing to see him rattling off these amounts of dialogue and monologues pretty much effortlessly, and then to say that he has the attention span of a gnat is just him being humble because it was impressive. I’m one who really prides myself on being prepared and to see him show up like that and make everyone’s job a lot easier was impressive.”

Yeah, but as actors you need to do this every day all the time, right?

Hopkins: “Yeah, but you see, he [pointing at Wahlberg] does great stuff with improvising and I love that.”

Wahlberg: “Well, we had so much opportunity to really play around and there are so many laughs, and his character, I think what he brought to it too is he was just so excited to be there and his energy was really infectious and everybody kind of fed off of that and the humour and to see him say some of the things that he says are really going to get big, big laughs.”

Really?

Hopkins: “Sincerely, this sounds like such bull, but for me to be involved in an American movie, as I’ve been involved in many of them, especially in that ethos of English society and aristocracy and working with Michael Bay and Mark, it’s a great feeling because you get so bored watching serious movies and everything’s so boring and Michael Bay comes on set with Mark Wahlberg and you don’t have a chance to be bored, you just don’t have a chance, you have to keep up with it.”

Give me an example.

“There’s a wonderful moment when we’re at Stonehenge and Michael Bay comes into my trailer, and we were at Stonehenge, 5,000 years ago it was established, and there’s another Stonehenge that the art department had built down the road so they could blow up bombs and all that. So Michael comes into my trailer and says, ‘So we’re at the real Stonehenge, yeah?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, yeah.’ And he said, ‘Ours is much better than theirs.’ [Laughs.] Only an American would say that…. That’s what I love about America and working with Americans. You don’t have time to be precious and holier than thou, too thoughtful, because it’s so boring, all that stuff [pretends to snore while Wahlberg laughs]. It’s true, I was watching PBS, classic movies, after four minutes, that’s it, bye.”

Does this mean you’re doing all your own stunts in this movie?

Hopkins: “Oh, I did all of my own stunts, didn’t I? [Turns to Wahlberg, joking.]”

Wahlberg: “Yeah. And even all that you’re saying is not deterring me from wanting to be English and be a knight.”

Hopkins: “He wants to be a knight. I’ll see what I can do with the queen.”

Wahlberg: “Thank you.”

What do you think will surprise audiences most about this movie?

Wahlberg: “That Mike was still able to create new and exciting and fresh elements to this story, and new characters, and making it more exciting and more interesting than the last.”

Bigger action and better stunts?

Wahlberg: “Yup. And new characters, the whole thing.”

Hopkins: “It’s a well-written script, isn’t it?”

Wahlberg: “Yeah, it’s hard and frustrating not to give away the good bits of the story because there are so many twists and turns and things that people are really going to be surprised about.”

Melissa Sheasgreen is a content producer for the Cineplex Pre-Show.

See Transformers: The Last Knight when it hits theatres June 21st! »

- Melissa Sheasgreen

Permalink | Report a problem


Bruce MacCallum, Camera Operator, Dies at 70

14 June 2017 6:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bruce MacCallum, a camera operator on films including “Silence of the Lambs” and a longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 70.

MacCallum started out in entertainment as an assistant to Dustin Hoffman, then moved into the camera department and worked on films including “Raging Bull,” “Married to the Mob,””All that Jazz,” “Witness,” and “Heartburn” as assistant cameraman.

He went on to become camera operator on “School of Rock,” “The Departed,” “I Am Legend” and “The Adjustment Bureau.”

More recently he worked on TV shows including “The Night Of” and “The Blacklist” as well as the recent feature “The Book of Henry.”

MacCullum helped train and mentor many fellow members of the International Cinematographers Guild (Icg, Iatse Local 600), where he served as National Assistant Secretary-Treasurer between 2007 and 2016.

He is survived by Linda, his wife of 32 years.

Related storiesJodie Foster Writes Heartfelt Tribute to Jonathan DemmeJodie Foster Pays Tribute to Jonathan Demme, »

- Pat Saperstein

Permalink | Report a problem


Bruce MacCallum Dies: Veteran Camera Operator And Union Activist Was 70

14 June 2017 4:47 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died in Los Angeles on June 12. Most recently he was working in TV on HBO’s The Night Of and NBC’s The Blacklist. He was 70. Among the feature films MacCallum worked on during his long career were All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), The Silence Of The Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007) and The Adjustment Bureau (2011). MacCallum started his entertainment industry career in 1973 as a personal assistant… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Bruce MacCallum Dies: Veteran Camera Operator And Union Activist Was 70

14 June 2017 4:47 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died in Los Angeles on June 12. Most recently he was working in TV on HBO’s The Night Of and NBC’s The Blacklist. He was 70. Among the feature films MacCallum worked on during his long career were All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), The Silence Of The Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007) and The Adjustment Bureau (2011). MacCallum started his entertainment industry career in 1973 as a personal assistant… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Bruce MacCallum, Veteran Camera Operator, Dies at 70

14 June 2017 4:44 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles, the International Cinematographers Guild announced. He was 70.

MacCallum served as a camera assistant and operator for more than 40 years, with credits including All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), Heartburn (1986), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007), Julie & Julia (2009), The Adjustment Bureau (2011), Winter's Tale (2014) and Broadway's Hamilton.

He was the recipient of the Camera Operator Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 and was nominated for the 2017 Camera Operator of the Year Award in Television for his work (along with Ben Semanoff) on HBO's The Night Of. He »

- Mike Barnes

Permalink | Report a problem


Bruce MacCallum, Veteran Camera Operator, Dies at 70

14 June 2017 4:44 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles, the International Cinematographers Guild announced. He was 70.

MacCallum served as a camera assistant and operator for more than 40 years, with credits including All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), Heartburn (1986), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007), Julie & Julia (2009), The Adjustment Bureau (2011), Winter's Tale (2014) and Broadway's Hamilton.

He was the recipient of the Camera Operator Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 and was nominated for the 2017 Camera Operator of the Year Award in Television for his work (along with Ben Semanoff) on HBO's The Night Of. He »

- Mike Barnes

Permalink | Report a problem


Stop Making Sense June 17th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

13 June 2017 3:05 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I wanna introduce the band by name!”

Stop Making Sense screens Saturday, June 17th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the fourth film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Stop Making Sense (1984) is an action-packed concert film… not in the sense of leaping towers of pyrotechnics… but in the way of seeing David Byrne falling back, standing up, shoving lamps, and running around risers, while musicians emerge song-by-song and various backgrounds come and go. Everything is in perfect place for this concert film directed by Jonathan Demme –and, even better, it’s nonstop. There are no minute-long, audience-panning breaks; if one song ends, the next one’s almost there. And, of course, there’s the music. See this one at Webster U and you’ll be treated to some wonderful tracks -from a spastic, minor-keyed “Psycho Killer” to a somehow strangely touching, »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


Melvin And Howard June 16th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

12 June 2017 2:48 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“No one seems to love or understand me. Oh what hard luck stories they all hand me”

Melvin And Howard screens Friday, June 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the third film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Paul Le Mat is an average Joe named Melvin E. Dummar in Melvin And Howard (1980) an effective combination of drama and comedy from director Jonathan Demme. Melvin often finds it difficult to make ends meet, no matter what line of work he’s in. Then, one day, it seems as if his luck might change. A stranger leaves on his desk a will proclaiming Melvin to be one of 16 heirs to the fortune of reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes. Once upon a time, Melvin had given a lift to an aged, decrepit looking individual (Jason Robards) who claimed to be Hughes. The »

- Tom Stockman

Permalink | Report a problem


It’s Probably No Surprise That Anthony Hopkins Doesn’t Understand The Transformers Movies

11 June 2017 11:53 PM, PDT | Fortress of Solitude - Movie News | See recent Fortress of Solitude - Movie News news »

You’ve got to love Sir Anthony Hopkins. While many actors would have at least pretended to be interested in the blockbuster films they are involved in, the Silence of the Lambs actor has made no bones about the fact that he not only doesn’t understand the films but that he took the job for the […]

The post It’s Probably No Surprise That Anthony Hopkins Doesn’t Understand The Transformers Movies appeared first on Fortress of Solitude. »

- Edward Nigma

Permalink | Report a problem


Transformers 5 Story Left Anthony Hopkins Baffled

11 June 2017 3:28 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

When Anthony Hopkins says he just doesn't get the story behind Transformers: The Last Knight, he's not trying slam the latest sequel. He's 79 years old, and as any Transformers fan of any age can attest, the last four movies had convoluted, confusing storylines that sometimes didn't make a lick of sense. On that note, the iconic actor does want fans to know he had an absolute blast making the movie.

The Transformers movies have never been accused of having coherent storylines, and it sounds like Transformers: The Last Knight isn't any different. Sure, there was a writers' room with some of the most brilliant screenplay writers in Hollywood helping to hammer out the two hundred and ten page script. But that doesn't mean they were able to come up with something that makes any sense. All in all, that's kind of the charm of a Transformers movie. Who really cares what it's about? »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


Colin Trevorrow says Jurassic World sequel will be scarier than Jurassic World

11 June 2017 9:35 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Colin Trevorrow may have handed over directing duties on the Jurassic World sequel to J.A. Bayona in order to concentrate on Star Wars: Episode IX, but he does remain heavily involved with the project, having co-written the screenplay and serving as executive producer on the film. Speaking to CinemaBlend, Trevorrow has revealed that he believes the sequel will be scarier than Jurassic World, although it will also contain the same fun kind of adventure present in the 2016 blockbuster.

“J.A Bayona is very good at [creating scares],” states Trevorrow. “There are things that he’ll just do with a shadow, or a rustling curtain on a wall. He’s so tapped into that kind of fear, especially the fear through the eyes of child. Which, you know, he and I are just simpatico. We may be the mirrors of each other. It is by far the most satisfying collaboration of my life. »

- Amie Cranswick

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future

9 June 2017 11:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Much has been written about “Hannibal” returning for a fourth season ever since the acclaimed NBC series signed off the air in August 2015. Creator Bryan Fuller has been vocal about his wish to continue the series, and his enthusiasm for more “Hannibal” was on full display during a video appearance at New York’s Split Screens Festival on Thursday night. Fuller lit up anytime someone floated the idea of new “Hannibal” episodes, so much so that it seemed clear Season 4 is no longer an “if” but a “when.”

Read More: Bryan Fuller Has Pitched ‘Hannibal’ Season 4 to Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen, and They’re ‘Keen On It’

Fuller has teased what he has in mind for a potential Season 4 in previous interviews, including the use of elements from “The Silence of the Lambs.” The rights to the story have been owned by the producers of Jonathan Demme’s movie »

- Zack Sharf

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Hannibal’ Season 4: Bryan Fuller Says Christopher Nolan Holds the Key to the Series’ Future

9 June 2017 11:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Much has been written about “Hannibal” returning for a fourth season ever since the acclaimed NBC series signed off the air in August 2015. Creator Bryan Fuller has been vocal about his wish to continue the series, and his enthusiasm for more “Hannibal” was on full display during a video appearance at New York’s Split Screens Festival on Thursday night. Fuller lit up anytime someone floated the idea of new “Hannibal” episodes, so much so that it seemed clear Season 4 is no longer an “if” but a “when.”

Read More: Bryan Fuller Has Pitched ‘Hannibal’ Season 4 to Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen, and They’re ‘Keen On It’

Fuller has teased what he has in mind for a potential Season 4 in previous interviews, including the use of elements from “The Silence of the Lambs.” The rights to the story have been owned by the producers of Jonathan Demme’s movie »

- Zack Sharf

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 217 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners