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Quigley Down Under (1990) Poster

Trivia

Sharps Rifles are now so inseparably related to this film that they are commonly nicknamed "Quigley guns." Sales for such weapons increased by over 1000% following the film's release, especially in the United States and Australia, and continue through 2013.
Three Sharps rifles were built for the film: one for shooting, one as a club in the fight scenes, and a back-up weapon in case one was damaged. Tom Selleck requested to keep the 3 rifles built for the film. He had two of them reconditioned to remove scratches and straighten and tighten some of the moving parts. Years later, he signed and auctioned 2 of them as part of a fundraiser for the National Rifle Association, of which he is a national board member. Selleck donated the third rifle, with its fringed leather scabbard, and belt knife to the Brownell's Family Museum.
The film was to have been Steve McQueen's follow-up to The Hunter (1980), but he fell ill shortly after making that, so the project was scrapped. It was revived several times throughout the 1980s, with various stars in mind for the lead. Harrison Ford was offered the lead role, but turned it down because he considered it too visibly similar to Indiana Jones. The lead was first offered to Tom Selleck in 1985. He had to turn it down because of his commitment to Magnum, P.I. (1980). When the series concluded in 1988, he quickly asked if the role was still available, and accepted it. The producers spent another year gathering a reasonable budget.
Quigley's ability to shoot accurately to over 1200 yards (1.09 kilometers), with iron sights, is not as far-fetched as it sounds. In 1874, during the Second Battle of Adobe Walls, in northern Texas, William Dixon used a .50-110 Sharps to shoot a Native American off his horse from 1,538 yards (1.4 kilometers). Such a heavy bullet propelled by black powder would have a trajectory similar to that of an arrow fired from 100 yards, striking its target at a 30-degree down angle. Dixon claimed his shot was pure luck.
Matthew Quigley's gun is a replica model 1874 Sharps Buffalo Rifle, built by Shiloh Rifles of Montana. They are chambered in .45-110, which is a .45 caliber bullet propelled by 110 grains of black powder. This round was the most accurate and powerful in the world until the advent of smokeless gunpowders.
One of a number of early career movie roles where English actor Alan Rickman portrayed a villain after his breakthrough movie role as one in Die Hard (1988). Rickman's other villainous film rogues from this period include the pictures Quigley Down Under (1990) and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991).
Both Steve McQueen and Clint Eastwood were considered for the lead role of Matthew Quigley which in the end was cast with Tom Selleck.
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The four words that Matthew Quigley used to answer the "long-distance shooting" newspaper wanted advertisement read, "M. Quigley 900 yards".
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The movie's closing credits open with their first title card clearly stating: "No animals were killed or injured during the making of this film".
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Screenwriter John Hill first began writing the film's screenplay in 1978.
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The character Grimmelman is portrayed by actor Ron Haddrick whose real life wife's maiden name is Margaret Lorraine Quigley.
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The picture was produced by the then just newly formed Pathe Group under the control of Alan Ladd Jr. whose passion for the project assisted the picture to get financed and green-lit.
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According to show-business trade-paper 'Variety', the "script was written for 'Steve McQueen' in the 1970s, then developed in 1984, Rick Rosenthal to helm; project was reactivated in 1986 with Lewis Gilbert scheduled to direct". In the end, the movie starred Tom Selleck and was directed by Simon Wincer.
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In real life, Quigley would have picked up his spent bullet shells and saved them for reloading later, since replacing them would have been impossible.
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First of three collaborations, all westerns, between Tom Selleck director Simon Wincer. The other two, Monte Walsh (2003) and Crossfire Trail (2001), were television productions.
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The opening title card reads, "Fremantle, Western Australia".
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The name of the Australian outback pub in Fremantle, Western Australia was the "Black Swan Hotel".
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This Australian movie western had three top-billed stars none of whom were Australian. Tom Selleck is from the USA, Alan Rickman is English, and Laura San Giacomo is American but of Italian origin.
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Alan Rickman decided to take the part because filming was taking place in Australia. He always wanted to visit Australia.
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The name of the country outback station in Australia was "Marston Waters" named after the family surname of Elliott Marston (Alan Rickman).
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First of two 1990s Australian cinema movie westerns directed by Australian director Simon Wincer. The oater movies were Lightning Jack (1994) and Quigley Down Under (1990). Wincer had previously directed the American television western mini-series Lonesome Dove (1989) and later directed Crossfire Trail (2001) the latter which also starred Tom Selleck.
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The nickname that Crazy Cora (Laura San Giacomo) had for Matthew Quigley (Tom Selleck) was "Roy" - the name of her deceased husband.
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According to the Wikipedia website, during the mid-1980s [around 1986] "the film was almost set up at Warner Bros with Lewis Gilbert as director but it fell over during pre-production".
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The name of the clipper ship was the "Miss Liberty" of the Port of San Francisco.
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The movie "marks [the] debut film under the Pathe-MGM/UA banner" according to the TCMDb movie database website.
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The evil British officer in this movie is Major Ashley-Pitt. The first Ashley-Pitt to appear in the movies was David McCallum's character in The Great Escape. That Ashley-Pitt was a Royal Navy aviator, with the rank of Lieutenant Commander. A major and Lt. Cmdr. are equivalent ranks.
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While discussing the colt army revolver during the dinner in Marstons house, Quigley quips that "God made all men. They say Sam Colt made them equal". This is a paraphrase of the post-civil war slogan "Abe Lincoln may have freed all men, but Sam Colt made them equal".
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Harrison Ford was offered the lead role but turned it down. This is a reversal of fortunes as Tom Selleck was the original choice to play Indiana Jones but had to turn it down due to filming Magnum P.I.
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The opening theme music is eerily similar to the opening theme music of The Sons of Katie Elder (1965).
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