Let Him Have It
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

3 items from 2012


Christopher Eccleston: from superheroes to Sophocles

28 June 2012 2:25 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

For Christopher Eccleston, small is always beautiful, whether it be TV thriller Blackout or Greek tragedy Antigone on the stage. He reveals why making films just doesn't compare

He strides across the polished tiled floor, past imposing columns and heavy, intricately carved doors. Outside, the Manchester winds are furiously buffeting the redbrick walls of this grand, turn-of-the-last-century university hall. There seems nowhere more appropriate to meet Christopher Eccleston: he has a face to fit buildings like this, an on-screen intensity that is the match of the architecture. But even so, his latest TV role looks set to stretch him: an unflinching, uncomfortable, three-hour examination of addiction and corruption, in which Eccleston goes from rock bottom to hero, as Manchester politician Daniel Demoys.

Written by Bill Gallagher, who adapted Lark Rise to Candleford for the small screen, Blackout puts alcoholism under the microscope in the course of its three episodes. »

- Vicky Frost

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Christopher Eccleston: from superheroes to Sophocles

27 June 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

For Christopher Eccleston, small is always beautiful, whether it be TV thriller Blackout or Greek tragedy Antigone on the stage. He reveals why making films just doesn't compare

He strides across the polished tiled floor, past imposing columns and heavy, intricately carved doors. Outside, the Manchester winds are furiously buffeting the redbrick walls of this grand, turn-of-the-last-century university hall. There seems nowhere more appropriate to meet Christopher Eccleston: he has a face to fit buildings like this, an on-screen intensity that is the match of the architecture. But even so, his latest TV role looks set to stretch him: an unflinching, uncomfortable, three-hour examination of addiction and corruption, in which Eccleston goes from rock bottom to hero, as Manchester politician Daniel Demoys.

Written by Bill Gallagher, who adapted Lark Rise to Candleford for the small screen, Blackout puts alcoholism under the microscope in the course of its three episodes. »

- Vicky Frost

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Why I've lent my voice to the death penalty abolition cause | Paul Bettany

28 March 2012 9:08 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In my adopted home, the Us, capital punishment is still the norm in many states. After Troy Davis' execution, I had to take a stand

In the UK, it's the human rights violation that it's still socially acceptable to support: the death penalty. You can be pro-capital punishment and not get ejected from a dinner party. It's probably not going to cause outrage if a social gathering throws out a "we need a strong deterrent" line, or if someone says "it's what they deserve, an eye for eye."

Which, in a sense, is slightly strange. It's nearly 50 years since there was capital punishment in Britain and knowledge of it is increasingly filtered mainly through films like Let Him Have It, or Pierrepoint, or 10 Rillington Place. As it happens, these films, plus others like Dead Man Walking, hardly present an unproblematic view of the penalty, so why do people – quite a few, »

- Paul Bettany

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

3 items from 2012


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