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How Ossie Davis’ Children Are Celebrating What Would Have Been His 100th Birthday (Exclusive)

How Ossie Davis’ Children Are Celebrating What Would Have Been His 100th Birthday (Exclusive)
Ossie Davis’ children are inspiring a new wave of activists through their father’s legacy.

The film, television and Broadway actor, director, poet, playwright and civil rights activist who died in 2005 at the age of 87, would have celebrated his 100th birthday on Monday (Dec. 18). In honor of the centennial milestone, Nora Davis Day, Guy Davis and Dr. Hasna Muhammad Davis (the three children of Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee) are highlighting their father’s “contributions to the struggle.”

“We know that if Dad and Mom were around now, they would want to be a part of this discourse around civil rights. This renewed activism, the challenging of the status quo, and augmenting the voices that are truly marginalized,” Hasna told Et during a phone interview on Friday. “Since he’s not here, we do have this opportunity to include his and Mom's voices, so that we can help attribute and provide historical context, and encourage the vehicle
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

She’s Gotta Have It is too indecisive as it enters its final act

One of the most infuriating things about She’s Gotta Have It is the show can’t decide if it wants to be an explicitly political and reactionary treatise on Black life in America or a soapy, sexy dramedy. Spike Lee has been able to balance the two. Jungle Fever is the classic example of Lee gradually turning a…

Read more...
See full article at The AV Club »

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)
Annabella Sciorra has signed with CAA in all areas, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. She was previously with Abrams Artists Agency.

The actress' film debut in 1989’s True Love earned her an Independent Spirit nomination for best female lead, and two years later she broke out starring opposite Wesley Snipes in Spike Lee’s interracial romance drama Jungle Fever. That was followed by Curtis Hanson’s hit psychological thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992), in which she starred opposite Rebecca De Mornay, and then, in 1993, the romantic comedy The Night We Never Met, produced by Miramax.

It was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Annabella Sciorra has signed with CAA in all areas, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. She was previously with Abrams Artists Agency.

The actress' film debut in 1989’s True Love earned her an Independent Spirit nomination for best female lead, and two years later she broke out starring opposite Wesley Snipes in Spike Lee’s interracial romance drama Jungle Fever. That was followed by Curtis Hanson’s hit psychological thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992), in which she starred opposite Rebecca De Mornay, and then, in 1993, the romantic comedy The Night We Never Met, produced by Miramax.

It was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)
Annabella Sciorra has signed with CAA in all areas, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. She was previously with Abrams Artists Agency.

The actress' film debut in 1989’s True Love earned her an Independent Spirit nomination for best female lead, and two years later she broke out starring opposite Wesley Snipes in Spike Lee’s interracial romance drama Jungle Fever. That was followed by Curtis Hanson’s hit psychological thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992), in which she starred opposite Rebecca De Mornay, and then, in 1993, the romantic comedy The Night We Never Met, produced by Miramax.

It was...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Annabella Sciorra Signs With CAA (Exclusive)
Annabella Sciorra has signed with CAA in all areas, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned. She was previously with Abrams Artists Agency.

Her film debut in 1989’s True Love earned her an Independent Spirit nomination for best female lead, and two years later she broke out starring opposite Wesley Snipes in Spike Lee’s interracial romance drama Jungle Fever. That was followed by Curtis Hanson’s hit psychological thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle, in which she starred opposite Rebecca De Mornay, and then, in 1993, the romantic comedy The Night We Never Met, produced by Miramax.

It was sometime after...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’

Sammy Davis Jr. ‘I’ve Gotta Be Me’
Premiering at Tiff 2017, Sammy Davis, Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me is the first major film documentary to examine Davis’ vast talent and his journey for identity through the shifting tides of civil rights and racial progress during 20th-century America.

Today Sammy Davis is seen primarily as part of The Rat Pack. That quartet of bad boys who sing and joke around is very much a part of time when Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were the kings of the Las Vegas scene.

But Sammy Davis Jr. was much more than that and merely by lending his black face to that group makes The Rat Pack seem like a liberal if slightly dissolute, but a filled-with-fun group. In truth, his position with Sinatra, Martin, Peter Lawford was not all that comfortable and the path Davis had already trod before landing there was not a simple or easy one.

He
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

‘The Sopranos’ Star Frank Vincent, Best Known For Mob Roles in TV and Film, Is Dead at 78

  • Indiewire
‘The Sopranos’ Star Frank Vincent, Best Known For Mob Roles in TV and Film, Is Dead at 78
Frank Vincent, the actor perhaps best known as mob boss Phil Leotardo on “The Sopranos,” has died following complications from heart surgery. He was 78.

TMZ first posted the news, reporting that Vincent suffered a heart attack last week, and died while undergoing open-heart surgery in New Jersey on Wednesday.

According to IMDb, Vincent was attached to several projects in pre-production, including the features “Asbury Park” and “Sarah Q.” He recently voiced a character on the Adult Swim series “Mr. Pickles,” and also appeared in an episode of “Law & Order: Svu.”

Other TV credits include “NYPD Blue” and “New York Undercover,” while on film he was seen in Martin Scorsese films such as “Raging Bull,” Billy Batts (“Go home and get your f–king shine box!”) in “Goodfellas,” and Frank Marino in “Casino.” He was also a regular in Spike Lee films like “Do The Right Thing” and “Jungle Fever.”

But
See full article at Indiewire »

Frank Vincent, 'Sopranos' and 'Goodfellas' Actor, Dead at 78

Frank Vincent, 'Sopranos' and 'Goodfellas' Actor, Dead at 78
Frank Vincent, the character actor that specialized in Mafia roles and appeared as a mobster in Goodfellas, The Sopranos and Casino, died Wednesday. He was 78.

The actor died at a New Jersey hospital following complications from open-heart surgery, TMZ reported. The Blast adds that actor Vincent Pastore, who co-starred with Vincent in The Sopranos, notified friends of Vincent's death.

Director Martin Scorsese frequently cast Vincent in his films as the actor appeared in the filmmaker's Raging Bull, Casino and Goodfellas, which Rolling Stone placed at Number One on the 100 Greatest Movies of the Nineties list.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers

  • Indiewire
After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers
In a career that began with “sex lies and videotape” in 1989, “Logan Lucky” is Steven Soderbergh’s 26th theatrical release. It will extend his record as the top-grossing American director to come out of the independent scene in its formative years — a period we’ll define as 1975 (Joan Micklin Silver’s “Hester Street”) through 1992 (Quentin Tarantino’s debut, “Reservoir Dogs”).

To be clear, Soderbergh’s an outlier; his billion-dollar box office dwarfs every other indie filmmaker. However, looking at the performance of his contemporaries who got their start in that indie film movement, you may be surprised at who’s on the list. (Note: “Outside wide release” means less than 1,000 screens. Also, the list doesn’t include directors like Sam Raimi and Abel Ferrara, who have independent roots but were not discovered via the film festival/arthouse pathway, or Alan Rudolph, another significant ’80s figure; he started in horror films in the early ’70s.
See full article at Indiewire »

Spike Lee to Rally for Colin Kaepernick at NFL HQ

  • TMZ
Spike Lee to Rally for Colin Kaepernick at NFL HQ
Spike Lee is clearly fed up that Colin Kaepernick is unemployed -- and now he's going to bat for the Qb.  The legendary director of movies like "Do the Right Thing," "Jungle Fever" and "Malcolm X" is taking part in an event called, "United We Stand. Rally for Colin Kaepernick." It's all going down on Wednesday, August 23 in front of NFL Headquarters in NY. Multiple organizations are on board -- including the Justice League NYC and the Empowerment Movement.
See full article at TMZ »

The Big Sick: New Trailer Drops For The Judd Apatow-Produced Comedy

A popular (and legitimate) knock against the movie industry today is that big-budget blockbusters are squeezing out smaller, independent films. Put another way, Hollywood math favors massive spectacles that fill stadium seating; consequently, there's simply less opportunity for lower-budgeted personal or human stories that explore relationships, culture, and society. Even though indies are far cheaper to make, they don't yield remotely the same level of revenue. Stupid math!

Fortunately, the emergence of cash-flush, independent studios like Netflix and Amazon -- who've cultivated diverse, niche audiences -- are bucking the status quo. They're betting that multi-platform, worldwide streaming services are the secret sauce to unlocking success in smaller films, which the monolithic, risk-averse studios wouldn't otherwise touch. It's a huge win for film buffs and cinema lovers, who maybe aren't seeing their interests reflected in the typical summer or holiday fare.

Related: Soon You Will Be Able To Choose Your Own
See full article at LRM Online »

Charlie Murphy, Comedian and Brother of Eddie Murphy, Passes Away at 57

Charlie Murphy, Comedian and Brother of Eddie Murphy, Passes Away at 57
The Hollywood community is in mourning once again, after losing another beloved actor and comedian. Charlie Murphy, the older brother of legendary comedian Eddie Murphy and star of the iconic comedy series Chappelle's Show, has passed away at the age of 57. Murphy's manager confirmed that he died from Leukemia earlier this morning in a New York City hospital, where he was undergoing chemotherapy.

TMZ reports that the actor's death comes as an absolute shock to his family, since they had thought he was improving. The site says that his family would call him frequently, and that he would even joke that they were calling him too much. It hasn't been confirmed how long he had been undergoing chemotherapy treatment for, before his death.

Charlie Murphy was born July 12, 1959 in Brooklyn to Lillian Murphy, a telephone operator, and Charles Edward Murphy, a New York transit officer who was also an amateur actor and comedian.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Charlie Murphy, Comedian and 'Chappelle's Show' Star, Dead at 57

Charlie Murphy, Comedian and 'Chappelle's Show' Star, Dead at 57
Charlie Murphy, the older brother of Eddie Murphy, a Chappelle's Show star and an accomplished comedian in his own right, died Wednesday in New York City. He was 57. Murphy's publicist confirmed the comedian's death to Rolling Stone, adding that the cause of death was leukemia.

"Our hearts are heavy with the loss today of our son, brother, father, uncle and friend Charlie," the Murphy family said in a statement. "Charlie filled our family with love and laughter and there won’t be a day that goes by that his presence will not be missed.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Ghost In The Shell And Boss Baby Take Another Crack At The Box Office Beast -- The Weekend Warrior

Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.

Two Very Different Movies Look to Divide Up the Weekend Box Office Business

With Disney’s Beauty and the Beast continuing to dominate at the box office with $90 million this past weekend, and Saban’s Power Rangers (Lionsgate) also doing exceedingly well with $40 million in second place, you wouldn’t think anyone would try to release a movie that might get overshadowed by those two blockbusters.

That said, what’s interesting about this weekend is the fact there are two very different movies that are competing very heavily for second place with DreamWorks Animation’s latest animated family film, The Boss Baby (20th Century Fox), taking on the live action English remake of Ghost In The Shell (Paramount), starring Scarlett Johansson. In most cases,
See full article at LRM Online »

15 years on, Spike Lee's 25th Hour remains an effective post-9/11 catharsis, and one of his strongest films

Spike Lee has a noted history of dissent through cinema. It is, more or less, how he rose to prominence. When you think of moments like Mookie throwing that trash can through Sal's window in Do the Right Thing, or even the depiction of Gator's crack addiction in Jungle Fever, you are seeing moments that carry the weight of the "now" without the precedence of anything that came before them. Yes, once upon a time, Spike Lee frequented in controversy and honesty as easily as he did passion and prodigious visual efficacy. And then the late 90's happened.    Part of Lee's fall from grace (critically, anyway) was self-imposed. He saw the flaws and troubling tendencies in the American studio system, and was determined to...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Park Chan-wook Talks ‘The Handmaiden,’ Male Gaze, Queer Influence, and Remaking a Spike Lee Film

The Handmaiden is, in some way, the über Park Chan-wook film — revenge! double-crosses! violence! eyebrow-raising sex scenes! wild angles and edits! — thus making it a perfect occasion to speak with South Korea’s best-recognized auteur. That I don’t especially love his latest picture and, still, found myself eager to speak with him about its particulars should be a testament to the level of interest it affords. When was the last time a filmmaker could reasonably answer questions about the use of subtitles?

When we get into the film’s sexual politics — a major point of contention in our Cannes review — it’s clear that Park feels a deep need to defend his material and artistic perspective, but the conversation remained cordial as he paced back and forth in a Manhattan hotel room. I’ll let you discover the rest for yourself.

I’d like to thank Wonjo Jeong, who provided excellent on-site translation.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Black films matter – how African American cinema fought back against Hollywood

The late 80s and 90s heralded a breakthrough led by Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing and John Singleton’s Boyz N the Hood. At first, Hollywood embraced this wave of talent, then it ignored it. Now, in the wake of #OscarsSoWhite, black film is rising again

‘Black film properties may be to the 90s what the carphone was to the 80s; every studio executive has to have one,” wrote the New York Times magazine in the summer of 1991. It’s a comment that speaks volumes about both a cultural moment and its transience. The piece was titled They’ve Gotta Have Us, referring to Spike Lee’s 1986 breakthrough movie She’s Gotta Have It. The group portrait on the cover brought together an impressive collection of young, black film-makers – what has been labelled “the class of 91”. Lee was head boy, of course. By that time he was well
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Halle Berry: How Spike Lee Gave Her the Opportunity to Break Out From ‘Gorgeous Girl’ Roles

  • Indiewire
Halle Berry: How Spike Lee Gave Her the Opportunity to Break Out From ‘Gorgeous Girl’ Roles
Two weird truths about Hollywood: The industry loves to pigeonhole good-looking performers (especially good-looking actresses) into roles seemingly more suited to their physical attributes And it also loves nothing more than when an attractive star plays ugly (or even average!) to get into character for a splashy role. Halle Berry is certainly familiar with this strange dichotomy, and the Oscar-winning actress recently spoke out about how she had to buck being typecast as a “gorgeous girl” in order to get the kind of work she really wanted.

In a new interview with W Magazine (via E! Online), Berry explains that when she first came to Hollywood, she was almost immediately disregarded by industry professionals, simply because of the way she looks. “I came from the world of beauty pageants and modeling,” she told W. “And right away when people heard that, I got discounted as an actor.”

Read More: Renee Zellweger
See full article at Indiewire »

Halle Berry Opens Up About Begging Hollywood to Take Her Seriously: 'Adversity Does Not Discriminate'

  • PEOPLE.com
Halle Berry Opens Up About Begging Hollywood to Take Her Seriously: 'Adversity Does Not Discriminate'
Being beautiful has not always been in Halle Berry's favor. The X-Men actress spoke with W for the magazine's October cover, and opened up about how she once had to beg Hollywood to take her seriously. "Just because someone looks a certain way doesn't mean that they are spared adversity," Berry, 50, said, adding, "Adversity does not discriminate." In the beginning of her career, the actress admitted she was reluctant to "play the gorgeous girl." She explained, "I came from the world of beauty pageants and modeling and right away when people heard that I got discounted as an actor.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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