MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 457 this week

Jungle Fever (1991)

 -  Drama | Romance  -  7 June 1991 (USA)
6.5
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.5/10 from 11,645 users  
Reviews: 51 user | 29 critic

Friends and family of a married black architect react in different ways to his affair with an Italian secretary.

Director:

Writer:

Watch Trailer
0Check in
0Share...

Editors' Spotlight

IMDb at Comic-Con 2014

Follow our coverage of Comic-Con 2014, direct from San Diego July 23-27 in our Comic-Con section.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 29 titles
created 08 Mar 2011
 
a list of 30 titles
created 16 Aug 2011
 
a list of 45 titles
created 22 Sep 2011
 
a list of 21 titles
created 1 month ago
 
list image
a list of 21 titles
created 1 month ago
 

Related Items

Search for "Jungle Fever" on Amazon.com

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Jungle Fever (1991)

Jungle Fever (1991) on IMDb 6.5/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Jungle Fever.

User Polls

6 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  
Director: Jim Kaufman
Stars: Lauren Bacall, Anthony Quinn, Jean-Pierre Aumont
Certificate: GP Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

The Merediths move to an isolated farm. Mrs. Meredith and the neighbour Will Cade become friends and anticipate becoming lovers.

Director: Guy Green
Stars: Ingrid Bergman, Anthony Quinn, Fritz Weaver
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Gilbert has to care for his brother Arnie and his obese mother, which gets in the way when love walks into his life.

Director: Lasse Hallström
Stars: Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio, Juliette Lewis
Romance | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

During a Caribbean holiday, a British civil servant finds herself falling in love with a Russian agent.

Director: Blake Edwards
Stars: Julie Andrews, Omar Sharif, Anthony Quayle
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Ben Sanderson, an alcoholic Hollywood screenwriter who lost everything because of his drinking, arrives in Las Vegas to drink himself to death. There, he meets and forms an uneasy friendship and non-interference pact with prostitute Sera.

Director: Mike Figgis
Stars: Nicolas Cage, Elisabeth Shue, Julian Sands
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A faded movie star and a neglected young woman form an unlikely bond after crossing paths in Tokyo.

Director: Sofia Coppola
Stars: Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Giovanni Ribisi
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A tale of nineteenth-century New York high society in which a young lawyer falls in love with a woman separated from her husband, while he is engaged to the woman's cousin.

Director: Martin Scorsese
Stars: Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

After a family tragedy, a racist prison guard reexamines his attitudes while falling in love with the African American wife of the last prisoner he executed.

Director: Marc Forster
Stars: Billy Bob Thornton, Halle Berry, Taylor Simpson
Forrest Gump (1994)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.8/10 X  

Forrest Gump, while not intelligent, has accidentally been present at many historic moments, but his true love, Jenny Curran, eludes him.

Director: Robert Zemeckis
Stars: Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise
The Piano (1993)
Drama | Music | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A mute woman along with her young daughter, and her prized piano, are sent to 1850s New Zealand for an arranged marriage to a wealthy landowner, and she's soon lusted after by a local worker on the plantation.

Director: Jane Campion
Stars: Holly Hunter, Harvey Keitel, Sam Neill
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Rich and bored aristocrats in Rococo France play high-stakes games of passion and betrayal.

Director: Stephen Frears
Stars: Glenn Close, John Malkovich, Michelle Pfeiffer
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A young couple living in a Connecticut suburb during the mid-1950s struggle to come to terms with their personal problems while trying to raise their two children. Based on a novel by Richard Yates.

Director: Sam Mendes
Stars: Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Christopher Fitzgerald
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Angie Tucci
...
...
...
Lucinda Purify
...
...
Drew
...
Paulie Carbone
...
Mike Tucci
...
Lou Carbone
...
Tyra Ferrell ...
Orin Goode
...
Vera
Veronica Timbers ...
Ming
David Dundara ...
Charlie Tucci
Edit

Storyline

A successful and married black man contemplates having an affair with a white girl from work. He's quite rightly worried that the racial difference would make an already taboo relationship even worse. Written by Murray Chapman <muzzle@cs.uq.oz.au>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sensuality, strong language, drug content, and for violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 June 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Febre da Selva  »

Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$32,482,682 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Giancarlo Esposito:  A homeless man picking up Gator's belongings while his wife throws them out of the window. This cameo role also serves as another reference to 'Do the Right Thing (1989)' as the homeless man is in fact the very same Buggin' Out character that protested Sal's lack of African-Americans on his wall of fame. See more »

Goofs

Cameraman's shadow on Flipper when he is telling Cyrus he cheated on Drew See more »

Quotes

Lucinda Purify: What happened to the color TV?
Gator Purify: Mama, I smoked the color TV!
See more »

Crazy Credits

Certain lyrics to the end song move across the screen during the credits See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood vs. Religion (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

Each Other's Throats
Music and Lyrics by Stevie Wonder
Performed by Stevie Wonder
by arrangement with Stevland Morris Music, ASCAP
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

parental relationships in "Jungle Fever"
4 April 2001 | by (Louisville, KY, USA) – See all my reviews

In his opening sequence to Jungle Fever, Spike Lee introduces the pervasive theme of the appropriateness of sex. Through the red haze of a Harlem morning, we are introduced to Flipper and his wife Drew in a very compromising position. Entangled in both the sheets and a moment of passion, the couple begin their morning in copulation, all the while trying desperately not to `wake the baby.' This `baby' could be a child who they've already produced or a child who is potentially in the making.

This notion of sex as a means of producing children runs throughout the film. We find that even after Flipper has begun his relationship with Angela Tucci, he would never think of having children with her. Flipper's fear of having mixed (`octoon, quadroon, mulatto') children is very high. We learn that his wife is mixed herself. Her father is white and her mother is black. During the scene in her office, we get a glimpse of the kind of heartache that she has suffered from her skin color, a result of the intermingling of the two races of her parents. This sex-and-its-aftermath theme manifests itself in the dysfunctional parent/child(ren) relationships throughout the film. Angie is tied to her father and two brothers as a sort of domestic slave. Not only does she have to work hard in a distant part of town all day, but she also has to return home to cook for and clean up after her three male family members. She seems to receive no financial or emotional support for her efforts either. This becomes very clear when her father beats her up after learning of her relationship with Flipper. We see a similar relationship develop with Paulie and his father. His father's constant nagging about the number of each of the periodicals that he orders on a daily basis coupled with his lack of gratefulness for the meals that he cooks for him each day drive Paulie mad. Though Paulie's father isn't as physically abusive as Angela's father is, we see his proclivity toward violence we he forces his way into the bathroom and whaps a teary-eyed Paulie on the head with a magazine. Eventually, Paulie is able to stand up to his father, telling him `I'm not your f***ing wife; I'm your son.'

The most powerful and destructive parent/child(ren) relationship that unfolds on the screen is that of Flipper's family, including his brother Gator and both of his parents. Lee's choice to introduce the reverend doctor and his wife as parents of Gator first necessarily colors our impression of them as good parents. What type of parents produce a crackhead? Certainly not the same type of parents that produce an upstanding architect, but maybe the type of parents who would rear an interracial adulterer. Other than Drew, who we really never see interact with her child, Gator's mother is the only mother to which we're physically exposed in the text. She loves both of her children and would rather not talk about the problems that exist in their relationships. Instead, she closes her eyes to the truth of Gator's drug habit and hands him money while he does the dances that she likes, and she would rather change the subject at the dinner table than broach the topic of adultery. This approach to parenting doesn't work any better than that of her counterpart. The reverend doctor doesn't ever want to really talk to his kids about their problems without using biblical metaphors. These one-sided diatribes seem to drown out any potential discussions just as much as the wailing of his favorite Mahalia Jackson records. In the end, he must kill his neglected son because he has deteriorated so extensively from crack use. The film's concluding sequence has brought us full circle. The framing of the newspaper landing on Flipper's stoop initially suggests that everything has returned to normal - that Drew has accepted her husband back into her life. Their daughter's smiles and giggles also point to the same conclusion. But we find, as Drew rolls over in bed and tells Flipper he better leave, that the sex is only a temporary fix for a desire for pleasure. The sex will not solve the problems that it has created. In the film's resolution, we see echoes of Paulie's father's former explosion in the bathroom: `All they think marriage is for is humping.'

The final, seemingly confusing line of the film - `Yo, daddy, I'll suck your big black d*** for $2.' - sums up this theme well. It both mirrors in video and echoes in audio an almost identical part from earlier in the film. When Flipper was walking his daughter to school, a crack whore approaches him with the offer, `I'll suck your d*** for $5.' By the film's end, the price has lowered, the sex has been cheapened, and the whore is addressing Flipper as `daddy.' In this final line, the importance of parent/child relationships is emphatic. Sex, a supposedly physical manifestation of love, often results in a product - a child. This child will then live in a society where sex and love is misguided or undirected altogether.


37 of 51 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Did Rev. Purify go to prison? Zorro-3
Is anyone in here in an interracial relationship? Scarface8890
Do Black people have an advantage? Scarface8890
A White woman's reaction to a White man dating interracially. aaronalmarez
The Music is annoying! jgar6-1
Favorite scene(s). Scarface8890
Discuss Jungle Fever (1991) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?