Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991) - News Poster

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'Paris Can Wait' Review: Alec Baldwin, Diane Lane Make Breezy Rom-Com Travelogue

'Paris Can Wait' Review: Alec Baldwin, Diane Lane Make Breezy Rom-Com Travelogue
If you’re longing for a delicious romantic romp to take your mind off the world going to hell in hand basket, Paris Can Wait is it. Eleanor Coppola, best known for putting together and narrating the landmark 1991 documentary, Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (about the torments suffered by her husband Francis Ford Coppola during the filming of Apocalypse Now) makes her non-doc directing debut with this delightful surprise package. Coppola is 80, but you'd never know it from her seductive lightness of touch.

Diane Lane is irresistible as Anne,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Paris Can Wait’ Director Eleanor Coppola: “I Never Imagined That I Would Be Making A Fiction Feature” – Toronto Studio

‘Paris Can Wait’ Director Eleanor Coppola: “I Never Imagined That I Would Be Making A Fiction Feature” – Toronto Studio
Eleanor Coppola, wife of renowned filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola, arrived at the Toronto International Film Festival this week with the sexy, charming road movie Paris Can Wait, her first narrative feature after decades in the industry. Acclaimed for her work in the documentary format (Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse), Coppola is now making waves with her new film, starring Diane Lane, Alec Baldwin and Arnaud Viard. Paris Can Wait centers on a woman…
See full article at Deadline »

Nicolas Winding Refn Talks 'My Life' Doc, What's Next, Dropping Studio Gigs & The Reaction To 'Only God Forgives'

This is a reprint of our interview from the 2014 Fantastic Fest. When it comes to documentaries that chart the making of a particular film, some of the very best have come from those closest to the filmmakers. The most towering achievement in this regard is probably "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse," an intense making-of documentary that follows Francis Ford Coppola and the bonkers production of "Apocalypse Now," which was co-authored by Coppola's wife, Eleanor. Following in Eleanor's footsteps is Liv Corfixen, the wife of "Drive" filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn, who took to cataloguing the production of Refn's polarizing, Bangkok-set thriller "Only God Forgives," with "My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn." We had the chance to sit down with Refn and Corfixen at the recent Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas. The documentary is an intimate portrait of frustration and familial unrest (since they had to move the family...
See full article at The Playlist »

'My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn' Trailer

'My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn' Trailer
Director Nicolas Winding Refn, who has created his own cult of obsessive fans with the thrillers Drive and Only God Forgives, has the camera turned on him by his wife in the intense and thrilling new documentary My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn. The first trailer has arrived, along with the poster and photo gallery. The film will be released in select theaters and on VOD this February.

RADiUS is behind My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn. This is director Liz Corfixen's intensely personal portrait of her husband and unique filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn. Shot over the course of the filming of Refn's 2013 film Only God Forgives, Corfixen's personal access allows for a unique look into Refn's filmmaking process.

Check out the first footage from My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn, which is sure to provoke memories of the 1991 documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse. Watch
See full article at MovieWeb »

365 Days, 100 Films #98 - Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991)

Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, 1991.

Directed by Fax Bahr and George Hickenlooper.

Starring Francis Ford Coppola, Marlon Brando, Eleanor Coppola, Sofia Coppola, Dennis Hopper, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford and George Lucas.

Synopsis:

A documentary detailing the difficult production of Apocalypse Now.

“My film is not a movie,” a passionate Francis Ford Coppola tells a press conference at Cannes in 1979, a beard so thick you’d mistake him as half-crazy. “My film is not about Vietnam,” he enlightens further, a translator beside him repeating his words in French. “It is Vietnam. It’s what it was really like. It was crazy.”

Hearts of Darkness is a documentary about the making of Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. The documentary lifts its title from the Joseph Conrad book on which that film was based, Heart of Darkness. ‘Heart’ is pluralised, accommodating for all those who have lost parts of
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Looking back at Apocalypse Now

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Michael celebrates the story behind the outstanding Apocalypse Now...

When reading the extensive, semi-mythological stories that detail the production of Francis Ford Coppola's surreal Vietnam epic, Apocalypse Now, it's baffling that it was made at all.

By the mid-1970s, Coppola was one of the stars of New Hollywood, holding unprecedented power and critical respect, dominating the 1974 Oscars with a total of fourteen nominations shared by his second Godfather rhapsody and the arty Antonioni riff, The Conversation, including a double nomination for Best Picture, and the rare honour of being nominated for both Best Original and Adapted Screenplays. This was alongside producing George Lucas' pre-Star Wars hit, American Graffiti, and contributing the screenplay to the lavish big-screen adaptation of The Great Gatsby, which helped place Coppola in the powerful position of being a successful director, producer and writer.

Coppola had developed a reputation of being both ambitious and reliable.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Looking back at Apocalypse Now

As it gets a re-release in UK cinemas, Michael celebrates the story behind the outstanding Apocalypse Now...

When reading the extensive, semi-mythological stories that detail the production of Francis Ford Coppola's surreal Vietnam epic, Apocalypse Now, it's baffling that it was made at all.

By the mid-1970s, Coppola was one of the stars of New Hollywood, holding unprecedented power and critical respect, dominating the 1974 Oscars with a total of fourteen nominations shared by his second Godfather rhapsody and the arty Antonioni riff, The Conversation, including a double nomination for Best Picture, and the rare honour of being nominated for both Best Original and Adapted Screenplays. This was alongside producing George Lucas' pre-Star Wars hit, American Graffiti, and contributing the screenplay to the lavish big-screen adaptation of The Great Gatsby, which helped place Coppola in the powerful position of being a successful director, producer and writer.

Coppola
See full article at Den of Geek »

Remembering The Godfather Part II with Francis Ford Coppola and Friends

  • Pajiba
On Saturday, March 26th, the Directors Guild of America hosted another event in celebration of their 75th Anniversary. Last month, they honored George Lucas with a screening of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977) and discussion between Lucas and Christopher Nolan. This time, the DGA hosted a panel honoring Lucas's benefactor, Francis Ford Coppola. Unlike the Lucas event, the DGA did not screen one of Coppola's many feature films, but asked three directors, David O'Russell (Three Kings, The Fighter), Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight, Thirteen), and Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, There Will Be Blood) to prepare short reels of some of their favorite scenes as a spring board for discussion. Each director's selections were fairly classical while also featuring some oddities: Hardwicke picked ten minutes from Apocalypse Now (1979), P.T. Anderson chose a selection from The Conversation (1974), my personal favorite of Coppola's films, and an odder choice, Youth Without Youth
See full article at Pajiba »

The Five Best DVDs of 2010

  • Pajiba
This year, unlike others, I was particularly out of loop on some major DVD and Blu-Ray releases. Despite my title as Pajiba's DVD Review editor, my reviews have been limited to a handful of purchases and some Netflix rentals. I simply do not have the physical space or the spending money to pull out all the stops every Tuesday. More significantly, many of the films that I love have already found excellent releases on DVD or Blu-Ray and double-dipping (or, in some cases, triple-dipping) on titles just doesn't make sense. Essentially, I just want to provide a disclaimer that this is, as most year end lists are, a highly subjective list. Now, without further ado, here is my list of my five favorite home video releases of 2010.

America Lost and Found: The Bbs Story [Criterion Collection, Blu-Ray]

While I've only reviewed a few selections of this set thus far for the site (Head,
See full article at Pajiba »

George Hickenlooper: The Mayor Of The Sunset Strip Interview, 2004

(Rodney Bingenheimer, the subject of Mayor Of The Sunset Strip, and Andy Warhol, above.)

Filmmaker George Hickenlooper passed away on October 29, 2010, at the way too early age of 47. This is an interview I did with George in 2004, around the release of his documentary Mayor of the Sunset Strip, which I consider one of the very best films ever made about the entertainment industry and one of my Top 20 Films of the past decade. Hickenlooper's last film, Casino Jack, starring Kevin Spacey, has just been released. This article originally appeared in Venice Magazine.

With Mayor of the Sunset Strip, George Hickenlooper takes us on a tour of the modern history of celebrity, via the life of legendary pop music impresario Rodney Bingenheimer.

By Terry Keefe

Filmmaker George Hickenlooper clearly loves the dreamers that drive the entertainment industry, but he's also very familiar with how Los Angeles can eat them alive. Many
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

"Casino Jack," Reviewed

  • IFC
We meet Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff in a public restroom. He's brushing his teeth and looking at himself in the mirror when he suddenly bursts into a monologue, a statement of principles brimming with anger and defiance. "Mediocrity," he tells himself, "is where most people live. It is the disease of the dull. I will not allow the world I touch to be vanilla!"

This is how the Abramoff biopic "Casino Jack" begins. It throws down the gauntlet and announces that it will not fall into the trap of so many bland ripped-from-the-headline biopics, and you have to admire the fact that director George Hickenlooper had the chutzpah to put himself and his film out there like that. But sadly, "Casino Jack" just doesn't measure up to its own yardstick of success. Despite some decent performances and a great true story, it is a vanilla mediocrity. Certainly watchable, but also instantly forgettable.
See full article at IFC »

George Hickenlooper died from accidental painkiller overdose

Factory Girl director died aged 47 after taking prescription drug with alcohol, coroner rules

Film-maker George Hickenlooper died from an accidental overdose after taking a prescription painkiller with alcohol, a coroner has ruled.

The 47-year-old director of films such as Factory Girl and the acclaimed Apocalypse Now documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, died suddenly in Denver last month. At the time it was reported that he had suffered a heart attack.

However, the Denver medical examiner's office said yesterday that Hickenlooper, who had been in the city to promote his latest film, died after taking ethanol and oxymorphone, which affected his central nervous system and breathing. The coroner said an autopsy found the director had a "moderately enlarged" heart, which, when combined with his sleep apnea, were "significant contributing factors to death".

Actors such as Kevin Spacey, who stars in Casino Jack, Hickenlooper's final film, expressed their regret following the director's death.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Casino Jack' Poster for George Hickenlooper's Final Film (Exclusive)

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Cinematical

Fairly appropriate for Election Day, and sadly as we mourn the film's director, George Hickenlooper, we present you with the official poster for the political comedy 'Casino Jack.' The one-sheet features Kevin Spacey, who stars as corrupt lobbyist Jack Abramoff, front and center amidst a red-white-and-blue-themed design. Also showcased are co-stars Kelly Preston, Barry Pepper (as Mike Scalon, coupled with another glimpse at Spacey) and Jon Lovitz, who looks quite miserable in a neck brace. Hickenlooper, who died suddenly this past Saturday, gets proper recognition for what is unfortunately his final film. His name is very prominently and largely printed in two separate spots.

With 'Casino Jack' Hickenlooper dramatizes the true story of the Abramoff scandal in a way that's surprisingly balanced and fun, according to Scott Weinberg's review from the Toronto International Film Festival, where the movie premiered in September. You'll "have a
See full article at Moviefone »

'Casino Jack' Poster for George Hickenlooper's Final Film (Exclusive)

'Casino Jack' Poster for George Hickenlooper's Final Film (Exclusive)
Filed under: Cinematical

Fairly appropriate for Election Day, and sadly as we mourn the film's director, George Hickenlooper, we present you with the official poster for the political comedy 'Casino Jack.' The one-sheet features Kevin Spacey, who stars as corrupt lobbyist Jack Abramoff, front and center amidst a red-white-and-blue-themed design. Also showcased are co-stars Kelly Preston, Barry Pepper (as Mike Scalon, coupled with another glimpse at Spacey) and Jon Lovitz, who looks quite miserable in a neck brace. Hickenlooper, who died suddenly this past Saturday, gets proper recognition for what is unfortunately his final film. His name is very prominently and largely printed in two separate spots.

With 'Casino Jack' Hickenlooper dramatizes the true story of the Abramoff scandal in a way that's surprisingly balanced and fun, according to Scott Weinberg's review from the Toronto International Film Festival, where the movie premiered in September. You'll "have a
See full article at Cinematical »

'Casino Jack' Director George Hickenlooper Found Dead at 47

Over the past couple months the festival circuit has been graced by the presence of director George Hickenlooper, the man behind such films as the Apocalypse Now behind-the-scenes documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, Factory Girl and, most recently, Casino Jack starring Kevin Spacey as hated lobbyist Jack Abramoff. However, whilst in Denver, Colorado visiting his cousin, mayor John Hickenlooper, and attending yet another film festival, The New York Times reports that the filmmaker was found dead over the weekend. At 47 years-old, Hickenlooper has apparently died of natural causes and no foul play is expected. Read on! As far as his friends and family are aware, Hickenlooper had not been experience any health problems  and the director had been quite energetically, and excitedly promoting Casino Jack at various film festivals in Toronto, Austin and other U.S. locales. Documentarian Mogran Spurlock even chronicled some of his festival activities in
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Factory Girl director George Hickenlooper dies aged 47

Film-maker dies after reportedly suffering heart attack in Colorado, where he was promoting Kevin Spacey film Casino Jack

George Hickenlooper, the director of films such as Factory Girl and acclaimed Apocalypse Now documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, has died suddenly in Denver following a reported heart attack. He was 47.

Hickenlooper, who according to his family had not been aware of any health problems, was found dead on Saturday morning having apparently died in his sleep. Police said there were no suspicious circumstances. The film-maker had been in Colorado to promote new film Casino Jack, a drama about the disgraced Washington lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

Kevin Spacey, who plays the lead role, said he was distressed to be writing a statement about a man he had expected to see next week in Los Angeles. "It is with great sadness that I have to even think about writing about George in this way,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Release Dates: 'Conan' Remake, '21 Jump Street,' 'Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter' and More

New release dates for upcoming films have been arriving at a fast and furious pace and in the past few days, on top of the updated Universal release schedule there have been several new dates announced and or shuffled around. I have detailed six of them directly below along with accompanying information for each.

Title: 21 Jump Street

Release Date: March 16, 2012

Films Releasing the Same Day: Contraband

Director: Phil Lord, Chris Miller

Cast: Jonah Hill

Storyline: The film, based on the TV series that launched Johnny Depp, follows a group of baby-faced cops who go undercover at high schools.

Title: Conan

Release Date: August 19, 2011

Films Releasing the Same Day: Fright Night and Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World

Director: Marcus Nispel (Friday the 13th)

Cast: Jason Momoa, Bob Sapp, Rachel Nichols, Stephen Lang, Ron Perlman, Said Taghmaoui, Rose McGowan

Storyline: The story opens on the battlefield where Conan
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Hickenlooper: 'Indie Film Has Become Pottery-Barn Cinema'

Hickenlooper: 'Indie Film Has Become Pottery-Barn Cinema'
George Hickenlooper, who abruptly died at 47 in Denver on Saturday morning as he was preparing for a film festival screening of his new film “Casino Jack,” had a career that spanned genres. He made acclaimed documentaries, including the “Apocalypse Now” chronicle “Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse” and “The Mayor of the Sunset Strip.” His short films include “Some Folks Call It a Sling Blade,” which was expanded into Billy Bob Thornton’s Oscar-winning feature “Sling Blade.” And he made narrative features, among them his tale of model and Andy
See full article at The Wrap »

Casino Jack director George Hickenlooper dies in Denver

  • Cineplex
George Hickenlooper, who won an Emmy Award in 1992 for directing Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, has died. He was 47.

In a statement Saturday, Denver mayor and Colorado Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Hickenlooper says his cousin died of apparent natural causes.

Los Angeles-based George Hickenlooper was in Denver for the premiere of his latest film, Casino Jack, starring Kevin Spacey as American lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

Other films directed by Hickenlooper include Factory Girl starring Sienna Miller as Edie Sedgwick, documentary Mayor of the Sunset Strip that profiled pop star impresario Rodney Bingenheimer and last year's documentary Hick Town, based on footage shot while he followed his cousin around during the Democratic National Convention in 2008.
See full article at Cineplex »

Emmy-Winning Director Dead at 47

Emmy-Winning Director Dead at 47
George Hickenlooper, who won an Emmy Award for the documentary "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse," has died. He was 47.

The filmmaker was found dead Saturday in Denver, Co, where he was premiering his new film "Casino Jack" at the Starz Denver Film Festival. Hickenlooper's cousin, Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper, who is running for governor of Colorado, said in a statement his cousin died of natural causes, The Denver Post reports.

"We are devastated," John Hickenlooper said in a statement.
See full article at Extra »
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