6.0/10
15,314
84 user 28 critic

Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man (1991)

Forced by the imminent foreclosure of their friend's bar, two lifelong buddies will decide to rob a bank's armored car, not knowing that its cargo is not money, but a new street drug.

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ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Jimmy Jiles
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Lulu Daniels
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Thom
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Kimiko
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Old Man
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Jose
Big John Studd ...
Jack Daniels
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The Woman
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James Nardini ...
Punk with Gun
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Storyline

The tough biker Harley and his no less tough cowboy friend Marlboro learn that an old friend of theirs will lose his bar, because a bank wants to build a new complex there and demands 2.5 million dollars for a new contract in advance. Harley and Marlboro decide to help him by robbing the corrupt bank. They rob the Bank transport and get hold of an amount of a new synthetic drug. Now they are targeted by criminal bankers. Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

marlboro | drugs | bar | biker | cowboy | See All (153) »

Taglines:

When the going gets tough... the tough take the law into their own hands.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and sensuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

23 August 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dos duros sobre ruedas  »

Box Office

Budget:

$23,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$7,434,726 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Harley Davidson (Black Death 3) was a 1989 FXLR, not an FXR (from original invoice) the third of four bikes to be built, by Bartels of Marina Del Ray in California, the first two (BD1, BD2)were scrapped, a third unrelated bike was built by Billy Westbrook for Mickey Rourke, and was promptly stolen. The bike we know as Black Death 3 (BD3) was the product of a sketch on a napkin Mickey used to draw on and built by Bartels, who built BD1+2. The fourth bike (BD4) was ordered from Bartels as a stunt bike, by MGM when Mickey wanted to use BD3 in the movie, and BD4 is on display at Loess Harley at Pacific Junction Iowa, who bought it off Gene Thomason, who bought it off MGM prophouse in 1995 for $12,000 and was one of the three builders, Gene, Dave Fournier and Allan Barsi at Bartels. BD4 bike, a standard engined bike was used for most of the movie, while BD3, fitted with a potent 98" Sidewinder Stroker kit was used in some scenes, if you crank the throttle hard, hang on tight, real tight on BD3. Chuck Zito an actor, stuntman and Hells Angel crashed BD3 at Pelham Bay on October 1999, and it was run over by a car. Zito claims to still own the bike, as claimed in his book. There are some differences between the bikes in the movie, the BD4 with black pipes and standard engine and BD3 with chrome pipes and sidewinder kit. Black Death 3 is the bike most people think was the movie bike. See more »

Goofs

There is a patch on the jacket Harley (Rourke) wears, that appears and disappears throughout the movie. It's on the front lower right side. It is there when he's standing outside their friends' bar with Marlboro, it's gone when they are inside. See more »

Quotes

Harley Davidson: You know, if I had a nickel for every time some piece of shit pointed a gun at me I'd be a rich man.
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Connections

Referenced in Basil Poledouris: His Life and Music (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

Ride with Me
Performed by Blackeyed Susan
Written by Dizzy Dean Davidson
Blackeyed Susan appears courtesy of Mercury/PolyGram Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Bikers With Hearts Of Gold
25 September 2005 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Two biking buddies team up to help a friend save his L.A. nightclub from an evil banker who wants to replace the beloved bar with an impersonal high-rise. The ensuing plot has the two bikers repeatedly confronting the banker's cold blooded, robotic henchmen, who make quite a fashion statement with their slicked-back hair, their blank faces, and their irritatingly hip, long black coats. The numerous confrontations between the two bikers and the thugs culminate in explosions, fights, and gunfire.

The story is standard Hollywood fluff, aimed at kids, young boys in particular. Except for the unique "airplane graveyard" setting, the plot is mostly a dud. Fortunately, the characterizations of the two leads rescue the film from banality.

Harley (Mickey Rourke) and Marlboro (Don Johnson), swagger, posture, and strut their macho stuff, as you would expect, for two bikers. They swear. They fight. And, of course, they follow the babes. Underneath the public toughness, however, are two nonconformists, and each has his own brand of insecurity. And, they have a conscience. They want to do the right thing. It is this textured characterization of Harley and Marlboro that makes the film worth watching, especially in the first twenty-five minutes, before the action plot interferes.

The is a working man's movie ... with all the gritty realism of urban street life. The film's first half features some good cinematography, sultry music and atmosphere, great production design, and costumes suitable for the most hip biker bar. The best approach to this film is to ignore the silly action plot, and focus instead on Harley and Marlboro, and their unorthodox outlook on life.


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