IMDb > Europa (1991)
Europa
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Europa (1991) More at IMDbPro »

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Europa -- Trailer for the experimental film set in postwar Germany
Europa -- Just after WW2, an American takes a railway job in Germany, but finds his position politically sensitive with various people trying to use him.

Overview

User Rating:
7.7/10   14,002 votes »
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Contact:
View company contact information for Europa on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 June 1991 (Germany) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Just after WW2, an American takes a railway job in Germany, but finds his position politically sensitive with various people trying to use him. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
16 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
The culmination of Lars Von Trier's period of perfectionism -- 9/10 See more (57 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Jean-Marc Barr ... Leopold Kessler

Barbara Sukowa ... Katharina Hartmann

Udo Kier ... Lawrence Hartmann
Ernst-Hugo Järegård ... Uncle Kessler
Erik Mørk ... Pater
Jørgen Reenberg ... Max Hartmann
Henning Jensen ... Siggy

Eddie Constantine ... Colonel Harris

Max von Sydow ... Narrator (voice)
Benny Poulsen ... Steleman
Erno Müller ... Seifert
Dietrich Kuhlbrodt ... Inspector

Michael Phillip Simpson ... Robins
Holger Perfort ... Mr. Ravenstein
Anne Werner Thomsen ... Mrs. Ravenstein
Hardy Rafn ... Man in Housecoat
Cæcilia Holbek Trier ... Maid
János Herskó ... Jewish Man
Talila ... Jewish Wife
Claus Flygare ... Father
Jon Ledin ... American Soldier

Baard Owe ... Man with Papers
Leif Magnusson ... Doctor Magnus

Lars von Trier ... Jew
Vera Gebuhr ... Depot Assistant
Else Petersen ... Old Female Assistant
Ben Zimet ... Old Man 1
Tadek Lokcinski ... Old Man 2 (as Thadee Lokcinski)
Peter Haugstrup ... Piccolo

Directed by
Lars von Trier 
 
Writing credits
Lars von Trier  &
Niels Vørsel 

Produced by
Philippe Bober .... associate producer
Bo Christensen .... producer
François Duplat .... executive producer
Patrick Godeau .... executive producer
Peter Aalbæk Jensen .... producer
Gérard Mital .... executive producer
Gunnar Obel .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Joachim Holbek  (as Joakim Holbek)
 
Cinematography by
Henning Bendtsen 
Edward Klosinski  (as Edward Klosinsky)
Jean-Paul Meurisse 
 
Film Editing by
Hervé Schneid  (as Herve Schneid)
 
Casting by
Rie Hedegaard 
 
Production Design by
Henning Bahs 
 
Costume Design by
Manon Rasmussen 
 
Makeup Department
Isabelle de Araujo .... makeup artist
Sanne Gravfort .... hair stylist
Morten Jacobsen .... key makeup artist
Dennis Knudsen .... hair stylist
Jolanta Pruszynska .... makeup artist: Poland
 
Production Management
Wieslawa Borecka .... production manager: Poland
Philippe Guez .... production supervisor
Thomas Heinesen .... production manager: second unit
Lars Kolvig .... production supervisor
Lene Nielsen .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tómas Gislason .... assistant director: second unit
Egon Haase .... second assistant director
Elizabeth Frey Harne .... second assistant director
Tom Hedegaard .... first assistant director
Janusz Petelski .... assistant director: Poland
 
Art Department
Andrzej Borecki .... production designer: Poland
Søren Gam .... property master (as Søren G. Henriksen)
Peter Grant .... property master
Simone Grau .... assistant props (as Simone Grau Larsen)
Emil Kostecki .... property master: Poland
Bogdan Piotrowski .... property master: Poland
Finn Skovgaard .... storyboard artist
Kazimierz Stys .... property master: Poland
Gitte Zehngraff .... assistant production designer
 
Sound Department
Pierre Excoffier .... sound recordist (as Pierre Excoffier)
Philippe Fabbri .... boom operator
Henrik Garnov .... dubbing engineer
Carl Aage Hansen .... sound effects
Thomas Krag .... sound
Per Meinertsen .... sound engineer
Julien Naudin .... sound effects
John Nielsen .... boom operator
Per Streit .... sound designer (as Per Streit Jensen)
 
Visual Effects by
Jan-Erik Sandberg .... optical effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jan Andersen .... lighting assistant
Bo Bendtsen .... clapper loader
Jakob Bonfils .... grip
Jesper Find .... first assistant camera
Andrzej Gierak .... lighting technician: Poland
Tomasz Habrewicz .... assistant camera: Poland
Jørgen Johansen .... electrician
Ireneusz Kisielewicz .... lighting technician: Poland
Rolf Konow .... still photographer
Krzysztof Koperski .... lighting technician: Poland
Jean-Yves Le Poulain .... assistant camera
Marek Modzelewski .... lighting technician: Poland
Thomas Neivelt .... lighting technician
Tadeusz Obuchowicz .... assistant camera: Poland
Jacek Stachlewski .... camera operator: Poland
Søren Sørensen .... lighting technician
Roman Taborski .... lighting technician: Poland
Mike Valentine .... underwater camera operator
Henryk Wingert .... lighting technician: Poland
 
Casting Department
Annette Grunnet .... casting coordinator
Rie Hedegaard .... casting coordinator (as Marie Louise Hedegaard)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Malgorzata Brus .... wardrobe assistant: Poland (as Malgorzata Zduleczny)
Hanna Golebiowska .... wardrobe assistant: Poland
Ole Kofoed .... wardrobe
Malou Listoft .... wardrobe
Anna Rychlik .... wardrobe assistant: Poland
Helena Tarnacka .... wardrobe assistant: Poland
 
Editorial Department
Urszula Lesiak .... assistant editor
Michael Frank Nielsen .... color timer
 
Other crew
Sabelle Arcay .... production assistant
Britt Bendixen .... choreographer
Ewa Borek .... production assistant: Poland
Erik Crone .... production assistant
Linda Daae .... continuity
Tómas Gislason .... continuity
Tómas Gislason .... shooting script
Józef Jarosz .... production assistant: Poland (as Jozef Jarosz)
Julian Jencquel .... production runner
Lisbet Matz .... production assistant
Mouns Overgaard .... production staff
Zdzislaw Sajuk .... production assistant: Poland
Monica Steenberg .... production assistant
Françoise Valentine .... underwater coordinator (as Fran Valentine)
Lars von Trier .... continuity
Lars von Trier .... shooting script
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Zentropa" - USA
See more »
MPAA:
Rated R for scenes of violence
Runtime:
112 min
Language:
Color:
Black and White | Color (Pathécolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Director Cameo: [Lars von Trier]the Jew who signs the affidavit clearing the name of the Zentropa owner.See more »
Quotes:
[last lines]
Narrator:In the morning, the sleeper has found rest on the bottom of the river. The force of the stream has opened the door and is leading you on. Above your body, people are still alive. Follow the river as days go by. Head for the ocean that mirrors the sky. You want to wake up to free yourself of the image of Europa. But it is not possible.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Europa AriaSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
32 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
The culmination of Lars Von Trier's period of perfectionism -- 9/10, 10 February 2006
Author: UlrikSander from Denmark

Storyline: Max von Sydow's voice-over narration hypnotizes the protagonist (and audience) back to 1945 where our protagonist the young American ideologist Leopold Kessler (Jean-Marc Barr) has just arrived in post-WWII 1945 Germany to help rebuilding the damaged country. Uncle Kessler (Ernst-Hugo Järegård) supplies Leopold with a job in the big Zentropa train corporation, but soon Leopold falls in love with Katharina Hartmann (Barbara Sukowa); daughter of Zentropa owner Max Hartmann (Jørgen Reenberg). Leopold soon finds himself caught in a web of corruption, being taken advantage of, losing his ideology, and is forced to chose between pest or colera.

Mysterious, mesmerizing, manipulative, noirish, haunting, beautiful, and ugly. These are some immediate, grandiose, descriptions that come to mind when thinking of Lars von Trier's 1991 masterpiece EUROPA; the final chapter of the Europa trilogy. In USA it was retitled ZENTROPA so audiences wouldn't confuse it with Agnieszka Holland's EUROPA EUROPA from 1990 (equally a WWII drama). The Europa trilogy also consists of FORBRYDELSENS ELEMENT from 1984 and EPIDEMIC from 1987 (the infamous experiment that only sold 900 tickets in the Danish cinemas). The trilogy thematically deals with hypnotism and loss of idealism, although the themes of this trilogy are not as essential as the visuals. In the opening-shot of EUROPA we see a locomotive moving towards us while our unidentified narrator literally hypnotizes us: "On the mental count of ten, you will be in Europa. Be there at ten. I say: ten". A metaphor for movies' ability to transport us into a subconscious dream-reality.

EUROPA utilizes a strange but extremely effective visual style -- that famous Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky is Trier's main-influence says it all. It's a black-and-white movie occasionally intertwined with red in form of blood, a red dress etc. According to rumors this inspired Steven Spielberg to use the similar effect in SHINDLER'S LIST from 1993 (coincidentially another WWII drama). Furthermore Trier uses so-called Dutch angels and reinvents background-projection by adding separately shot co-operating layers upon layers, but unlike old Hollywood movies that incorporated it for economical reasons, Trier uses it for artistic reasons. These carefully executed strange-looking visual techniques underline that we are in a dream-reality, we are hypnotized; the universe of EUROPA is not real! EUROPA is often criticized for weighing advanced technique (such as multi-layered background-projection) above plot and characters, but hey that's what reviewers criticized Stanley Kubrick's 1968 visual masterpiece 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY for -- nowadays it holds an obligatory place in all cinema-history books.

EUROPA also gets accused of historical incorrectness. Apparently Trier assigns the Nazis' Werewolf terrorist-group too much historical significance. According to various online-sources that's correct (a fascinating subject - try Googl'ing it yourself!), yet Trier's purposes are neither educational nor portraying history accurately. EUROPA is a never-ending nightmare. Leopold Kessler is hypnotized, therefore the universe that the audience encounters is a distorted reality. Equally it shows how our memory deceives us -- a 100% accurate reconstruction is a lie! Although young audiences who experience EUROPA are too young to have memories from WWII, we have a collective memory of it from various BBC documentaries, so these small inaccuracies actually serve a purpose: they inform us us that we are not in post-WWII Germany 1945, but in Leopolds memory of it.

All three Europa trilogy chapters portray young ideologists with noble intentions forced into corruption and losing their ideological innocence. The ambiguous endings of FORBRYDELSENS ELEMENT and EUROPA show the ideologists getting forever caught in their hypnotized realities. Before, during and after shooting EUROPA in 1990 in Poland, Lars von Trier and co-writer Niels Vørsel were extremely interested in WWII. It shows. It's packed with extremely beautiful shots catching the atmosphere of the time-period spot-on. A great example is the old Polish church (EUROPA was shot in Poland primarily for economic reasons) in the last act of EUROPA. As with 2001: SPACE ODYSSEY I think EUROPA will receive it's rightfully deserved place in cinema-history. Its method of twisting old film-noir love-affair clichés and visual techniques is so unique, strange and completely different from anything you will see from Hollywood nowadays, or any other dream-factory for that matter.

EUROPA is an essential movie in the Lars von Trier catalog. Some write it off as pure commercial speculation, but that would be catastrophic. It's right up there with other Trier classics and semi-classics such as FORBRYDELSENS ELEMENT from 1984, the TV-series RIGET from 1993 and DOGVILLE from 2003. It's a unique experience from before Trier cared for his actors, and before the Dogme95 Manifesto. Watch it! "On the count of ten..." 9/10

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Europa (1991)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
I am so confused! citybum
Blowing up the train anthonylchamberlain
Franz Kafka's America daniel_man38
Zentropa alludes to Closely Watched Trains? peter-gitto
Denazification is one of the subjects of the film... mlovmo-2
Black G.I. mmsonnabend
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