52 user 14 critic

Dutch (1991)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 19 July 1991 (USA)
2:04 | Trailer

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To get to know his girlfriend's son, a working-class good guy volunteers to pick him up from a prep school, only to learn that her son isn't the nicest kid.



4,416 ( 5,728)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »





Cast overview, first billed only:
Doyle Standish (as Ethan Randall)
Hailey (as E.G. Daily)
Homeless Woman
Lisa Figus ...
Cedering Fox ...
Party Woman
Kyle Fredericks ...
David James Alexander ...
Man #1
Ross Borden ...
Man #2
Joe Baker ...
Party Butler


Working-class good guy Dutch Dooley is the current boyfriend of a wealthy, snobbish tycoon's ex-wife. Volunteering to drive the woman's son home for Thanksgiving to Chicago from his boarding school in Georgia, little does Dutch expect the picaresque adventures in store for him. When a blunt, down-to-earth construction worker takes to the road with an insufferable twelve-year-old snob (desperately insecure under the surface) who does not approve of him in the least, quite a little must happen before they can reach their destination as friends -- or, for that matter, get home at all. Written by Paul Emmons <pemmons@wcupa.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


They're the best of friends... And they've got the scars to prove it. See more »


Comedy | Drama


PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:





Release Date:

19 July 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Driving Me Crazy  »


Box Office


$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,997,000, 19 July 1991, Wide Release

Gross USA:

See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs


Sound Mix:


Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?


Mel Gibson turned down the role of Dutch Dooley. See more »


When Doyle demands that Dutch stop the car near the beginning of the film, Dutch complies, stating, "You can't beat a Ford for good brakes." The car being driven is a Lincoln. However, Dutch may have been referring to Ford in a broader sense, as Lincoln is Ford's luxury brand. See more »


[first lines]
Party Woman: Pardon my incredulity, Natalie, but I'm very surprised to see you here. Pleasantly so, of course.
Natalie: I'm a little surprised to see myself here, too, Mary Alice. Pleasantly so, of course.
Party Woman: Were you here last year?
Natalie: No, I wasn't invited last year.
Party Woman: Oh, curious. That must have been an accident. Oh, do you know Libby?
Natalie: No, I don't believe I do.
Party Woman: Libby, this is Natalie Standish. Natalie is Reed's... Oh, is it alright to...
Natalie: Say that Reed got me pregnant when I was a barhop at your country club? ...
See more »

Crazy Credits

Extra footage of 'Dutch" shooting off fireworks plays behind end credits See more »


Referenced in Mike & Mike: Episode dated 16 June 2016 (2016) See more »


Flatfoot Sam
Written by Clara Wills
Performed by TV Slim
Courtesy of MCA Records
See more »

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User Reviews

I can do something you can't...pay for my breakfast...
12 February 2004 | by See all my reviews

Although it has similarities to 'Trains, Planes and Automobiles', it is absolutely original. The two lead characters work so well together and off one another that it's hard to remember sometimes, Ethan Randall is just acting.

Basic Plot: Dutch (O'Neil), is dating a beautiful rich woman who is going through a separation with her well-to-do husband. She has a son named Doyle (Randall), who attends a boarding school far enough away from home, he has been requested to come home for Thanksgiving, by plane. He declines, and refuses to see his mother for the holidays. Instead of getting upset, she sends her, 'heart's bigger than his brain' for a boyfriend by car to go get her hurtful son. Once he arrives, he finds that this twelve year old is more problem than expected, and the road-trip that leads them from where they began to where they end up, is a truly heart-warming and funny story.

Hughes brings us characters in this that make you feel for them all. As in all of his films, for the most part, but to a certain degree even more so in this. A gradual escalation from hateful to loving, from cold to warm, and from angry to happy. It's most assuredly one of the best scripts ever written.

I give it a 9 out of 10 (10 being the highest). I don't give it a full ten, because there are some slow scenes, I could have done without, but they do help the movie keep its sincerity.

And that's my review.

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