6.1/10
22,754
79 user 22 critic

Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead (1991)

PG-13 | | Comedy | 7 June 1991 (USA)
Five siblings are left alone all summer when their mom leaves town and the evil babysitter bites the dust.

Director:

Reviews
Popularity
3,604 ( 542)

Watch Now

From $9.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
4 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Rose Lindsey
...
Bryan
...
...
Mom
...
Bruce
...
Cathy
...
Carolyn
Eda Reiss Merin ...
Mrs. Sturak
...
...
...
Gus
...
Chris Claridge ...
Lizard
...
Mole
Edit

Storyline

Single mother goes away for the summer. The kids are first delighted but then find that Mom has hired the sitter from hell to stay with them. When the sitter dies of a sudden coronary they deposit the body at a mortuary only to discover all their summer expense money was in her purse. The kids must find a way to survive the summer without mom or her money. This means actual work! Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

No rules. No curfews. No baths. No nagging. No pulse. See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 June 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Real World  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Gross:

$25,196,249 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Keith Coogan is the grandson of Jackie Coogan, Uncle Fester on The Adams Family. Jackie Coogan was also the impetus for Coogan's Law, a law which protects child actors from being exploited by unethical parents, agents and show business producers. The law was passed when Coogan discovered, at age 21, after years of working in showbusiness, that his bank account had been completely depleted. All the money he had earned doing movies as a child were taken by his mother, who stated, unapologetically, "Any money Jackie made prior to the age of 21 is legally ours, we never promised him otherwise". See more »

Goofs

After the babysitter arrives, Sue Ellen lies on her bed talking on the phone. The tip of a brown shoe appears in her doorway. It's Melissa, waiting for her cue to walk into the bedroom. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]
Sue Ellen "Swell" Crandell: I'm right on top of that Rose.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The two groundskeepers for the cemetery stand over the Babysitters grave and comment how nice it was for her to leave them the money. The tombstone reads "Nice Old Lady inside who died of natural causes". See more »


Soundtracks

Draggin' the Line
Performed by Beat Goes Bang
Produced by Alan Meyerson and Beat Goes Bang
Courtesy of Restless Records
Written by Tommy James and Robert King (as Robert L. King)
Published by Longitude Music Co.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Much better than is to be expected
1 June 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I loved this movie, I found it very entertaining and would recommend it.

I'm often surprised at the points people get hung up on in reviewing movies. They are, after all, FICTION. The main "controversy" surrounding this plot seems to be Sue Ellen's job. I have done office work for over 25 years and yes, it is entirely possible that Sue Ellen could have landed that position without too much trouble. Maybe not inside of five minutes at the first firm she walked into, but using a faked resume, as she was, she could have obtained a pretty soft office job without too much trouble. Some firms I've worked for would verify your more recent work experience, but many others never verify anything on a resume, and I've never once in all my years known of anyone to verify the education one claimed to have. Indeed, I've often kicked myself that I could have claimed to have some precious, worthless high dollar degree and no one would have questioned it.

Beyond this, the movie is awfully good for this genre of film. We see the children unexpectedly learning valuable life lessons and it changing them into better people. It's really a rather wholesome movie considering the time period and target audience. I've let my nephews, nieces, and grandchildren watch in my home, there is nothing more objectionable than the very occasional swear word in it.

One of my favorite movies from an otherwise dry period in Hollywood, highly recommended.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?