IMDb > Delicatessen (1991)
Delicatessen
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Delicatessen (1991) More at IMDbPro »

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Delicatessen -- The cult indie black comedy from the creators of AMELIE and CITY OF LOST CHILDREN.

Overview

User Rating:
7.7/10   65,386 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 31% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Writers:
Jean-Pierre Jeunet (screenplay) &
Marc Caro (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Delicatessen on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 April 1992 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A futuristic comic feast
Plot:
Post-apocalyptic surrealist black comedy about the landlord of an apartment building who occasionally prepares a delicacy for his odd tenants. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. Another 13 wins & 11 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
One most inventive and original films to grace the silver screen See more (165 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Marc Caro 
Jean-Pierre Jeunet 
 
Writing credits
Jean-Pierre Jeunet (screenplay) &
Marc Caro (screenplay) &
Gilles Adrien (screenplay)

Gilles Adrien (dialogue)

Jean-Pierre Jeunet (shooting script)

Produced by
Antoine Grujard .... post producer
Claudie Ossard .... producer
 
Original Music by
Carlos D'Alessio 
 
Cinematography by
Darius Khondji 
 
Film Editing by
Hervé Schneid 
 
Casting by
Pierre-Jacques Bénichou  (as Pierre-Jacques Benichou)
 
Production Design by
Marc Caro 
 
Art Direction by
Miljen Kreka Kljakovic (chief art director)
 
Set Decoration by
Aline Bonetto 
 
Costume Design by
Valérie Pozzo di Borgo 
 
Makeup Department
Nathalie Champigny .... key hair stylist
Myriam Coulet .... assistant makeup artist
Hugo Quiroga .... key makeup artist
 
Production Management
Michèle Arnould .... production manager
Grégoire Barachin .... assistant unit manager
Nadine Chaussonnière .... apprentice unit manager (as Nadine Chaussonniere)
Patrice Poupard .... assistant unit manager
Jacques Scarrone .... unit production manager
Jérôme Tokarz .... apprentice unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jean-Christophe Spadaccini .... second assistant director
Jean-Marc Tostivint .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Gilles Baillot .... constructor
Valérie Berthoux .... model maker
Bernard Boivin .... chief constructor
Jean-Michel Boivin .... constructor
Aline Bonetto .... set designer
Marc Caro .... storyboard artist
Jean-Philippe Carp .... set designer
Jean-Philippe Carp .... set dresser
Simon Carp .... second assistant art director
Marie Desforge .... model maker (as Marie Desforges)
Yves Domenjoud .... props
Nicolás Díaz .... sculptor (as Nicolas Diaz)
Gilles Faraldo .... constructor
Eric Frion .... constructor
Richard Gerardin .... constructor
Noël Guillot .... painter decorator
Jean-François Juvanon .... constructor
Miljen Kreka Kljakovic .... set designer (as Kreka)
Miljen Kreka Kljakovic .... set dresser (as Miljen Kljakovic)
Vincent Lebrinon .... constructor
Loïc Lemoigne .... second assistant art director
Andréa Llinaeres .... model maker
Fabrice Maux .... constructor
Jacques Mery .... constructor
Igor Mollet .... constructor
Jean Rabasse .... concept: roof
Jean Rabasse .... model conceptionist
Jean Rabasse .... set designer
Claude Sanzey .... constructor
Valérie Sebast .... model maker
Silvia Sella .... constructor
Yann Sibiril .... constructor
Jérôme Signori .... model maker
Bertrand Terreyre .... constructor
Denis Vassal .... constructor
Serge Vassal .... constructor
Tom Wiggins .... constructor
 
Sound Department
Vincent Arnardi .... sound re-recording mixer
Marc Caro .... sound effects
Laurent Dreyer .... assistant sound mixer
Gérard Hardy .... sound editor
Larry Hopkins .... layback sound mixer
Didier Jouyaux .... assistant sound editor
Jean-Pierre Lelong .... foley artist
Anne-Marie Lhote .... sound editor (as Anne-Marie L'Hote)
Mario Melchiorri .... assistant foley artist
Muriel Moreau .... dialogue editor
Daniel Orsini .... assistant dialogue editor
Julie Pribula .... trainee dialogue editor
Jérôme Thiault .... sound effects
Jérôme Thiault .... sound engineer
Jérôme Thiault .... sound
Jacques Thomas-Gérard .... adr mixer
Laurent Zeilig .... assistant sound engineer
Laurent Zeilig .... boom operator
 
Special Effects by
Jean-Baptiste Bonetto .... special effects
Yves Domenjoud .... special effects
Olivier Gleyze .... special effects
Lionel Mathis .... special effects
 
Visual Effects by
Baptiste Magnien .... optical effects: Acme
Pitof .... digital visual effects: Duran
Antoine Simkine .... digital visual effects: Duran
Vincent Tully .... motion control: Acme
Yves Tully .... motion control: Acme
Jean-Marie Vives .... digital matte painter
Rip Hampton O'Neil .... director of reseach and development (uncredited)
 
Stunts
William Cagnard .... stunts (as Williams Cagnard)
Rémi Canaple .... stunts
Patrick Cauderlier .... stunt coordinator
Didier Moirot .... stunts
Arlette Spetebroot .... stunts
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Franck Barreau .... electrician
Eric Caro .... set photographer
Rémy Chevrin .... first assistant camera
Philippe Derobert .... generator operator (as Philippe Mazure de Robert)
Bruno Dubet .... key grip
Bernard Gemähling .... chief electrician (as Bernard Gemahling)
Nicolas Juge .... additional electrician
Olivier Lancelle .... additional electrician
Philippe Le Sourd .... second assistant camera (as Philippe Lesourd)
Philippe Lesard .... second assistant camera
Lionel Perrin .... additional electrician
Ferencz Radnai .... additional electrician
Michel Sabourdy .... electrician
Gérard Sionneau .... generator operator
Stéphane Vidal .... additional grip
Yorgo Voyagis .... key grip (as Yorgo Voyatzis)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Véronique Degy .... assistant costumer
Valérie Pozzo di Borgo .... chief costumer
Marianne Vally .... assistant costumer
 
Editorial Department
Céline De Seyne .... post-production assistant (as Céline De Seynes)
Yvan Lucas .... color timer
 
Music Department
Jean-Michel Bergounboux .... music arranger (as Jean-Michel Bergounioux)
Isabele Pinadel .... musician: cello (as Isabelle Pinardel)
Hervé Schneid .... music editor
Les Sipolos .... musical saw (as Lev Sipolos)
René Taquet .... musical consultant
Hubert Varron .... musician: cello
Michel Wanker .... music mixer
 
Other crew
Fethi Abida .... caterer
Denyse Aureche .... accountant
Marc Bruckert .... titles: Le Village
Pierre Dufour .... location scout
Emmanuel Jaffre .... caterer
François Jeanson .... playing vehicles
Isabelle Lesenechal .... production secretary
Christophe Mache .... caterer
Marie-Christine Malbert .... press officer
Arlette Mas .... production administrator
Michael Mendelsohn .... banker/production financier
Caroline Selle .... production assistant
Aruna Villiers .... script supervisor
 
Thanks
Jean-Charles Bachelier .... thanks
Anne Bezançon .... thanks
Isabelle Boisbouvier .... thanks
Mme. Celerier .... thanks: Faculté de Jussieu
Thérèse Chevalier .... thanks
Olivier Chiavassa .... thanks
Henryk Chroscicki .... thanks
Roger Cornu .... thanks
Olivier de Mones .... thanks
Monsieur Delmas .... thanks
Françoise Elephantis .... thanks
Sylvain Frydman .... thanks
Françoise Geoffroy St Hilaire .... thanks
Monsieur Guirou .... thanks
Monsieur Josnin .... thanks
Alain Laury .... thanks
Gustave Parking .... thanks
Patrick .... thanks
Le Clown Pitou .... thanks
Edith Pommerol .... thanks
Monsieur Rabillon .... thanks
Monsieur Rouanet .... thanks
Les Sipolos .... thanks
Monsieur Tellier .... thanks
Mme. Toti .... thanks: Faculté de Jussieu
Jean Villiers .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for violence
Runtime:
99 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
At one point in the movie a female character claims they are entering the age of Virgo. This would place the movie roughly around 12,150AD, according to modern astrology.See more »
Goofs:
Audio/visual unsynchronized: Every time Julie plays the cello, the audio is behind what she plays. This is most visible in the first playing session when she is practising by playing C major up and down; the lag is several notes.See more »
Quotes:
Clapet:You think this is a safari, bitch?See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Micmacs (2009)See more »

FAQ

Odd Instrument?
See more »
124 out of 135 people found the following review useful.
One most inventive and original films to grace the silver screen, 9 September 2004
Author: The_Void from Beverley Hills, England

Delicatessen is hard to pin down under a specific genre label; it's a surreal black comedy, a human drama, a post-apocalyptic horror movie, a twisted thriller, a futuristic fantasy; and all in all; one of the strangest and most original films I've ever seen.

In this fantasy world, the world has been ravaged and food is now in short supply. This has therefore made food invaluable and it is being used as currency. Things are traded for with grain, corn and lentils, but not everyone can afford the luxury of food, and some have had to resort to cannibalism to continue to enjoy eating. Our scene opens at a delicatessen in an unspecified location in France, and we are treated to an absolutely delicious sequence (no pun intended) in which a man is desperately trying to hide himself in the trash can. We later find that the reason for this is that this particular delicatessen hires handymen and keeps them long enough to fatten them up, and then they are eaten by the delicatessen's butcher and the inhabitants of the apartment building in which they live. The story really gets going when an ex-clown turns up at the shop, wanting the handyman's job, which has...become available. The plot thickens when the new handyman meets, and later falls in love with, the butcher's daughter; Julie. Julie knows what goes on at the delicatessen and can't allow her new found love to meet the same fate as the others, and therefore does the only thing she can do; hire a band of vegetarian freedom fighters to save her love from becoming dinner for the butcher and his customers.

Delicatessen is directed by the team of Marc Caro (whom, I'm afraid, I am unfamiliar with) and the more well known Jean-Pierre Jeunet, director of a few lesser known modern classics, but best known for the enthusiastic 'Amelie'. The film is brought to life by a brilliant ensemble cast. Dominique Pinon (who also featured in Jeunet's Amelie, Alien 4 and City of Lost Children) takes the lead role of the clown turned handyman. His performance is both understated and magical; as he simultaneously manages to entice the viewer into his performance, and yet keeps his character in the realms of reality (a place in which this film doesn't take place). Jean-Claude Dreyfus is the real star of the show, however, as the extroverted and over the top butcher. His performance certainly isn't subdued, to say the least; and every moment that he is on screen is a delight. In a stark contrast to Dreyfus, Marie-Laure Dougnac; the young lady that plays his daughter and love interest for Pinon is very down to earth, and is the most 'normal' character in the film...although there's still room for her to be a nearly blind klutz. The rest of the ensemble comes together excellently, and not a single actor in the film performs below par or looks out of place; and there's not many films that you can say that for.

This film isn't quite like anything else I've ever seen. In fact, the only film I can think of that is similar to this is Terry Gilliam's futuristic fantasy; Brazil. The film draws it's originality from it's plot mainly, which is extremely surreal and inventive in itself, but it's not just that which makes Delicatessen one of a kind; it's all the smaller plot points. How many films do you know that feature a bullshit detector? (that is set off when the butcher tells it that "life is wonderful", no less). The way that the film looks is also wonderfully different; Delicatessen has a yellow hue, which lends it a style that is very dull and dreary; and that does the film no end of favours when you consider it's core subject material. The yellow hue also makes the film almost feel like a moving comic book, which is one of the things that gives the film it's surreal and absurd edge. I'm a big fan of atmospheric films, which is one of the main reasons why I like horror so much; and this film also has an atmosphere like no other. It's the way that the yellow-ish buildings look next to the dark skyline, and the way that the film uses darkness and smoke to make it more horrifying (see roof sequence towards the end) that gives this film the finishing touch to it's already distinct style.

The love story in the film is sweet and tender, and this very much offsets the dark overtones of the rest of the film. This is nice, as during the scenes between the clown (Pinon) and Julie (Dougnac), the film allows itself to indulge in humour that isn't dark like the rest of the film, and you get the impression that it's enjoying itself a little more. This is just another thing in a long line of great things that make Delicatessen a great movie. Another of these things is the more minor characters. I have never seen a more motley crew than the one in this film. As previously mentioned, Julie, although not entirely 'normal', is the most normal character in the film; the rest of it is populated by lunatics. There's a man with a house full of frogs, a woman that continually tries to commit suicide, a man that puts cans on his deaf mother in law so they know where she is etc. The support cast's wackiness don't add anything much to the story itself (which only really requires them to be there), but the fact that they are different and imaginative is another of the film's absurd edges, and another thing that makes this film different from everything else.

Delicatessen concentrates more on being absurd and surreal than it does in posing deep and philosophical questions. Personally, I have no problem with that, but those who do want a movie to be deep and meaningful might find the film disappointing because of that. That is not to say that the film completely lacks depth or meaning; although a moral to the story doesn't seem to present itself, the film takes it's depth from the 'what if' scenario that it presents; "if the world's food supply became too short to feed the population, would you resort to cannibalism or join the vegetarian freedom fighters?". It's a very general message; but it's definitely there.

Overall, Delicatessen is a sublime piece of cinema. You wont find imagination and inventiveness to the extent that it is shown here in most films, and that alone is reason enough to warrant this classic status. Delicatessen is everything I say it is and more; and overall the film is one of the true highlights of the 1990's. A gem.

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