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2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

BAFTA Favors Heavyweights Over Low-Budget Indies

BAFTA Favors Heavyweights Over Low-Budget Indies
It’s been 17 years since the BAFTA awards crucially shifted their place in the awards calendar. For decades, they’d taken place in the springtime, as a kind of quirky afterthought to the glossier Academy Awards, their voting only occasionally accounting for the trends set by other awards bodies: it was a time when films like “Jean de Florette” and “The Commitments” could emerge victorious in the top races, after sitting out the Oscars entirely.

In 2001, however, they moved back to February, preceding Oscar night by several weeks, and the game soon changed entirely: the BAFTAs joined the ever-expanding ranks of Oscar precursors, eventually changing even their branch-led voting system to align more with AMPAS rules. Their choices, in the process, have grown less singular too: In the last decade, 70% of BAFTA’s choices in the film, direction and acting categories have gone on to win the Oscar. Differences in collective taste may still emerge — the British
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

George Rr Martin series 'Nightflyers' receives Irish Film Board Funding

Other recipients include Rosie, written by Roddy Doyle and Pat Collins’ Folkland.

Source: Wiki Commons

George Rr Martin

The Irish Film Board has backed a major new international production from the creator of Game of Thrones in its latest round of funding decisions.

Filming is due to get underway this spring on Nightflyers, the first production based out of Limerick’s newly built Troy Studios. The forthcoming production was granted €850,000 by the Ifb - the single biggest award in its latest round of funding decisions. New features by Cathy Brady, Brian Kirk and Paddy Breathnach are also being supported.

Sets are currently being constructed in Troy’s vast studio space based in Ireland’s mid-west, with filming due to begin in the coming weeks. Originally commissioned as a pilot, Syfy confirmed it was going to series after creator George Rr Martin revealed the plans on his blog. Martin and Jeff Buhler are credited as co-writers, with Mike Cahill (Another
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New George Rr Martin series 'Nightflyers' receives Irish Film Board Funding

Other recipients include Rosie, written by Roddy Doyle and Pat Collins’ Folkland.

Source: Wiki Commons

George Rr Martin

The Irish Film Board has backed a major new international production from the creator of Game of Thrones in its latest round of funding decisions.

Filming is due to get underway this spring on Nightflyers, the first production based out of Limerick’s newly built Troy Studios. The forthcoming production was granted €850,000 by the Ifb - the single biggest award in its latest round of funding decisions. New features by Cathy Brady, Brian Kirk and Paddy Breathnach are also being supported.

Sets are currently being constructed in Troy’s vast studio space based in Ireland’s mid-west, with filming due to begin in the coming weeks. Originally commissioned as a pilot, Syfy confirmed it was going to series after creator George Rr Martin revealed the plans on his blog. Martin and Jeff Buhler are credited as co-writers, with Mike Cahill (Another
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Canon Of Film: ‘Once’

In honor of the recent release of ‘The Greatest Showman‘, we take a look back at one of the more under-seen musicals of the last decade, John Carney‘s ‘Once‘.

Once (2007)

Director/Screenwriter: John Carney

He (Glen Hansard), is a street guitarist/songwriter who works as a vacuum-cleaner repairman in his father’s shop in Dublin. One night, He meets She (Marketa Irglova) a young Czech pianist, who hears him playing, and she has a vacuum that needs repairing. She’s poor, and doesn’t own a piano, but she practices at the display at a local music store, and one day, He goes with her one day, guitar in hand… What happens next in John Carney’s independent musical ‘Once,’ cannot be described properly using detailed minutia. The word that keeps popping in my head to describe what happens is “magical,” and yet, that word still feels inappropriate. There is,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

10 Great Movies About Rock Bands You May Have Missed

10 Great Movies About Rock Bands You May Have Missed
IFC Films’ Sundance comedy “Band Aid” hits theaters on Friday, a much-anticipated debut for one of the most original movies about music in years. Written and directed by Zoe Lister-Jones, who also plays one of the lead roles, “Band Aid” tells the story of a dysfunctional married couple whose shared love of music leads to an unconventional form of couple’s therapy when they form a band with their neighbor (Fred Armisen). The film is Lister-Jones’ feature directing debut.

Read More: ‘Band Aid’ Trailer: Zoe Lister-Jones and Adam Pally Start a Band to Save Their Failing Marriage — Watch

Because music documentaries and biopics about famous musicians often hog up all the attention, original movies that incorporate music can sometimes slip through the cracks. These films often feature fictional bands playing original music or popular music. (The 2007 film “Once” beat the odds by gaining mainstream exposure, thanks in part to an
See full article at Indiewire »

Colm Meaney on playing Martin McGuinness: 'He was born into this'

The star of The Journey reveals how his own involvement with Sinn Féin helped him understand the late Ira commander turned peacemaker

As a Dubliner who has lived in Los Angeles for three decades, Colm Meaney says he always keeps an eye out for Irish scripts – but he confesses to a slight feeling of dread when one lands on his doormat. Cliched characters, simplistic politics, shonky dialogue – he’s seen them all. The 63-year-old has been lucky with some – particularly the trilogy of Roddy Doyle adaptions that began with 1991’s The Commitments and won him a Golden Globe nomination for The Snapper two years later – and less blessed with others that have come his way. “Oh yes. Mentioning no names but … oh yeah.”

So when he first heard about the Northern Irish novelist Colin Bateman’s script for a drama about Ian Paisley and Martin McGuinness, with the latter role potentially his,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Theatre Review: The Commitments (UK Tour)

The Commitments theatre review: The chance to see ‘The worlds hardest working band’ a Dublin soul band.

The Commitments theatre review, Katey Thompson at the New Victoria Theatre, Woking.

Photo Credit Johan Persson

Adapted from the Roddy Doyle book of the same name and following in the footsteps of the famous film, this musical attempts to recreate the same combination of musical passion and real-life pressure.

A band is born in mid-80s North Dublin, a place that needs a soul revival in the face of synth inspired pop. The band founder Jimmy (Andrew Linnie) attempts to bring together the musicians he can find to audition, along with friends of friends to make the dream come alive. Band tensions from the start threaten to undermine his ambitious project, but driven by a desire to be the ‘savior of soul’ he pushes forward, while desperately trying to hold it all together.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Return to Montauk review – beached affair takes time to connect

Past lovers Nina Hoss and Stellan Skarsgård border on the unlovable in this slow-paced drama, but Volker Schlöndorff’s film rewards patience for its final twist

Volker Schlöndorff’s scalding film of The Tin Drum shared the Palme d’Or with Apocalypse Now in 1979. The director turns 78 next month and is no longer at the peak of his powers. But Return to Montauk proves that he still has it in him to startle and wrongfoot an audience.

What appears to be a clunky, tasteful, middle-aged rehash of Before Sunset, with two former lovers reunited after one of them writes a novel about their affair, turns out at the eleventh hour to have a sting in its tail. Schlöndorff and the novelist Cólm Toibín wrote the screenplay, which is adapted in part from the memoir Montauk by the late Swiss playwright and novelist Max Frisch, to whom the picture is dedicated.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Garth Jennings interview: Sing, Roald Dahl and more

Brendon Connelly Jan 27, 2017

As Sing arrives in UK cinemas, we chat to its director, Garth Jennings, about lunchbreaks, the movie, and Roald Dahl.

I’m a huge fan of Garth Jennings’ work, from his milk-carton music videos to funny monkey TV ads, and into his feature films, The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy and Son Of Rambow. It’s been a long time coming but, after five years of work, Jennings’ third feature, Sing, is about to get its UK cinema release. When we caught up to chat last week, we talked about those five long years of hard work, about the projects that didn’t come together beforehand, and just a little of the plans that Jennings has for now. Here’s how our conversation went.

See related Luc Besson interview: Valerian, sci-fi, Adele Blanc-Sec Valerian: first trailer for hugely ambitious sci-fi film

Before you got Sing started,
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Film-making lost its lustre’: how Alan Parker found solace in art

Two years ago the acclaimed director of Bugsy Malone swapped his camera for canvas

From Bugsy Malone to Mississippi Burning to The Commitments, Sir Alan Parker has a hugely impressive back catalogue of cinema successes. But almost two years ago, at the age of 70, he decided to call time on a career that touched the heights.

He had written “a contemporary anarchic piece – a sort of Glaswegian Commitments,” he says, “only with darker humour. A friend of mine said he’d finance the whole thing. When it came to the nitty gritty, however … I had a bust-up with him over releasing a piddling amount of money for the art department to do a location recce. It was the final straw for me.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

20 Years of Pulp Fiction: Jack Rabbit Slim’s Fun Facts & Trivia

Let’s look back on twenty years’ worth of Pulp Fiction trivia and behind the scenes fun. You never know when they will release a Pulp Fiction Trivial Pursuit game right? Also, there are magnificent spoilers here, so you should probably watch the movie first and slap yourself for taking this long.

Here is some music to accompany you.

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Chronologically speaking, the last scene in the movie sees Butch and Fabienne drive away on a motorcycle. The very first sound heard at the start of the movie is the same motorcycle’s engine.

Whenever Vincent Vega goes to the bathroom, something bad happens: He emerges at Mia Wallace’s house to find her overdosing, comes out at the restaurant to
See full article at City of Films »

Review: "The Commitments" (1991) Starring Andrew Strong, Robert Arkins, Michael Aherne, Angelina Ball and Bronagh Gallagher; Blu-ray & Region 2 UK DVD Release From Rlj Entertainment Ltd

  • CinemaRetro
By Dawn Dabell

Can it really be 25 years since the release of The Commitments? An acclaimed hit with audiences and critics alike when first seen, it quickly grew in stature into something of a modern classic and has remained perennially popular ever since. It has also inspired touring bands, a major stage production and a few million sub-standard karaoke renditions of the iconic Mustang Sally (and other ditties) in pubs up and down the land.

Unemployed Jimmy Rabbitte (Robert Arkins) dreams of being a band manager, and places an ad in the local paper – “Have you got soul? If so the world’s hardest working band is looking for you.” Various losers, opportunists and drop-outs turn up at his door to audition, but bit by bit he manages to put together an inexperienced band comprising ten members: men, women, backing singers, guitarists, saxophonists, a drummer and an unlikely lead vocalist
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Commitments at 25: Robert Arkins, Ken McCluskey & Dave Finnegan interview

Extraordinary as it may seem The Commitments has reached its quarter century. This unlikely smash hit followed the fortunes of a group of young Dubliners scaling the cliff-face of soul to find fame and fortune. Their journey captured the imaginations of audiences around the world and made stars of its then-unknown cast.

The movie is a bittersweet story but one which had a happy ending for the actors, many of whom were given a unique opportunity by veteran director Alan Parker, bringing writer Roddy Doyle‘s novel to the screen.

We had the pleasure of catching up with Robert Arkins (band manager Jimmy Rabbitte), Dave Finnegan (mad drummer Mickah Wallace, who joined the interview part-way though) and Kenneth McCluskey (bass guitarist and butcher) for a trip down their respective musical memory lanes.

Robert Arkins

Thn: Does it feel like twenty-five years?

Robert Arkins: We can’t forget! We’re reminded of it every day!
See full article at The Hollywood News »

How We Made The Commitments

Alan Parker: ‘The cast improvised like crazy, breaking the record for most swearwords used in a film’

I was offered a chance to film Les Misérables in the late 80s, but I chose The Commitments instead. After making several films in America, I had a yearning to do something closer to home and to my working-class roots. Dublin’s Northside, where Roddy Doyle’s novel was set, closely resembled the Islington of the 1960s where I grew up. Everyone I knew wanted to be in a band to escape the world we found ourselves in.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: The Commitments

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ "Soul grabs you by the balls and lifts you above the shite." Ne'er was a truer word spoken. Undoubtedly one of the greatest music films of all time, The Commitments marks its 25th anniversary this year with a home entertainment re-release bursting with the vibrancy, heart, humour and charm of Alan Parker's 1991 feature. It remains an uplifting, enriching cinematic experience and wall to wall blast of sound, voluminous perms and full lexicon of Irish craic that shines with an entirely positive outlook on life and hardship in spite of the unemployment and urban decay faced by its main players in late 80's north Dublin.
See full article at CineVue »

The Commitments 25th Anniversary special edition review

Time for people of a certain age to start feeling old. It’s been a quarter of a century since director Alan Parker introduced us to an unlikely soul combo whose legacy still lives on via a hit stage show and countless concerts. So while their onscreen fortunes turned out to be mixed, The Commitments place in popular culture is absolutely assured.

Opening with a bustling Dublin street market with second hand goods, fiddle players and horses, this marks itself out from the blockbusters of the time as a gritty take on Roddy Doyle‘s source novel. Fast-talking wannabe music mogul Jimmy Rabbitte (Robert Arkins) has a simple idea: reasoning that the oppressed Irish are “the blacks of Europe”, he wants to assemble a world class soul outfit from local talent. But like the best band stories the road to success is paved with false starts, egos and copious amounts of drink and swears.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon’ Restoration Comes To Blu-Ray: See Ang Lee Discuss His Classic Martial Arts Film

‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon’ Restoration Comes To Blu-Ray: See Ang Lee Discuss His Classic Martial Arts Film
Ang Lee’s martial arts film “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” was a critical and commercial success upon release in 2000, garnering numerous awards and grossing over $200 million. It is now considered a modern classic and led to a boost in popularity of Chinese wuxia films. Now, an all-new 4K restoration of “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” will soon debut on Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD. Watch an exclusive clip of Ang Lee discussing his film and how martial arts movies owe a debt to musicals.

Read More: Watch: The Battle Begins In New Trailer For Netflix’s ‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword Of Destiny’

The new release will be loaded with all-new bonus content in both releases. The Blu-ray release will include six never-before-seen deleted scenes, all-new retrospective interviews with director Ang Lee, producer James Schamus and editor Tim Squyres, an archival making-of featurette and the “A Love Before Time” music video.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ Exclusive Special Feature Clip: See a Bonus Scene Not In The Movie

‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ Exclusive Special Feature Clip: See a Bonus Scene Not In The Movie
Richard Linklater’s latest film “Everybody Wants Some!!” follows a group of college baseball players over the course of one weekend in 1980. Our audience surrogate is Jake (Blake Jenner), a hotshot high school pitcher, who soon meets his rambunctious teammates, who include the smooth-talker Finnegan (Glen Powell), cocky star pitcher Glen McReynolds (Tyler Hoechlin), stoner transfer student Willoughby (Wyatt Russell), and more. During his introduction to the campus lifestyle, Jake eventually meets Beverley (Zoey Deutch), an outgoing performing arts major, who shows him the ways of the artsy side of college life.

Amidst all the drinking and competition, Jake witnesses how a malleable environment can beget individual adaptation, and how the mix-and-match qualities of college all but beg a student to embrace their own fluidity of self. Watch an exclusive clip from the “Everybody Wants Some!! More Stuff That’s Not In The Movie” special feature off the upcoming Blu-ray
See full article at Indiewire »
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