Barton Fink (1991) - News Poster

(1991)

News

14 Things We Learned About 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi'

14 Things We Learned About 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi'
The cast and creators of Star Wars: The Last Jedi had a whole lot to say in our new cover story – from writer/director Rian Johnson's revelation that he considered making Luke Skywalker blind to Adam Driver's confession of total emo ignorance to Daisy Ridley's declaration that she was done with the saga after the next movie (she's since attempted to walk that one back). But our in-depth interviews for the article yielded even more revelations that didn't quite fit. Here's what we learned.

1. J.J. Abrams couldn't resist returning for Episode IX,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Wonder Wheel' Review: Kate Winslet Singes in Woody Allen's Dour Drama

'Wonder Wheel' Review: Kate Winslet Singes in Woody Allen's Dour Drama
Kate Winslet is on fire in Woody Allen's Wonder Wheel, playing Ginny, an unhappily married waitress living near the boardwalk on Brooklyn's Coney Island circa 1950. This broken dreamer is pushing 40 and reaching the limits of her patience with Humpty (a solidly affecting Jim Belushi), the carousel-operator she married to provide a semblance of security for her pre-teen, budding-pyromaniac son Richie (Jack Gore), a budding pyromaniac. The Wonder Wheel outside their window spins in circles – just like Ginny, who drinks too much and lashes out at anyone who doesn't like it.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’ Gives Dan Stevens A Charming Yet Formulaic Holiday Biopic [Review]

Movies that center around writers tend to vary. The process of writing is so inherently introspective that trying to make that narratively interesting can be tricky. There are exceptions, of course. There are great movies, like Spike Jonze‘s “Adaptation,” that found ingenious, heartbreaking ways to depict what it means to be a writer without overdoing the showmanship. There are films, like “Barton Fink” and “The Shining,” that use different genres and dark comedy to translate the madness that comes in trying to jot down your thoughts.

Continue reading ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’ Gives Dan Stevens A Charming Yet Formulaic Holiday Biopic [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Eerie Cinematography Similarities of ‘Raising Arizona’ and ‘The Evil Dead’

By Jacob Oller

Travelling Pov shots are an ambiance-creating hallmark. he Coen Brothers always keep their low-budget horror teeth-cutting in the heart of their films. Think about the nightmare absurdism that is Barton Fink’s descent into a fiery hotel hell. What you might not realize is that specific cinematographic techniques (and equipment) make their films kin to those […]

The article The Eerie Cinematography Similarities of ‘Raising Arizona’ and ‘The Evil Dead’ appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today

The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today
The gravitational pull that exists between great directors and great cinematographers is natural. Many of the best pairings throughout film history have been project based, with the director or producer picking a cinematographer to achieve a specific look for a particular film. There’s a difference between providing a talented cinematographer with the perfect platform to apply their skills and a director-cinematographer collaboration that elevates the work of both artists, regardless of material.

This list is less about identifying the best looking films of the era – although many are here – and more about celebrating collaborations that have allowed many of the best filmmakers working today to fully express themselves on the big screen.

Dir: Paul Thomas Anderson, Dp: Robert Elswit

The first time Paul Thomas Anderson did not work with Elswitt – “The Master,” shot by Mihai Mălaimare Jr. – the results were (thankfully) great, but it’s fascinating that the director
See full article at Indiewire »

Mindhunter: spoiler-free season 1 review

Nick Harley Oct 17, 2017

Netflix's Mindhunter is a fresh look at the dark depths of the human mind. Here's our spoiler-free season 1 review...

What you think about Mindhunter, Netflix’s new ten-episode drama series shepherded by David Fincher, likely depends on your reaction to the musical cue at the end of the series’ second episode. After spending an hour indulging the proclivities of a serial killer who defiled severed heads, the credits roll to the tune of the Talking Heads’ Psycho Killer. Either you find the on-the-nose soundtrack choice to be a darkly funny way to cut the macabre tension, or you find the whole thing to be over-the-top and a little sick.

See related Red Dwarf Xii episode 1 review: Cured Red Dwarf: looking back at the past and ahead to the future Red Dwarf: top 20 episodes

A seventies period piece detailing the origins of criminal profiling on the homicidal and insane,
See full article at Den of Geek »

San Sebastián Review: ‘The Motive’ is a Smart Spanish Comedy

Writer’s block as a theme has given us subversive movies like Barton Fink and Adaptation, films that visualize creative impasse through contorted narratives and stylized cinema. The Motive (El Autor), a smart Spanish comedy from director Manuel Martín Cuenca, doesn’t get close in quality to those stand-out films, but in echoing Deconstructing Harry or Charlie Kaufman’s Synecdoche, New York, it deftly shows that the dividing line between fact and fiction has always been blurred.

Javier Gutiérrez is Álvaro, a notary in the southern Spanish city of Seville and a wannabe novelist who elevates his hum-drum life for years at a creative writing evening class where his amateurish writing is given short shrift by his irascible tutor (a great Antonio de la Torre).

His life is quickly overturned when his wife Amanda’s (Maríá León) debut novel becomes an overnight hit on the best-seller lists, and his ambitions
See full article at The Film Stage »

Composer Carter Burwell’s Goodbye Christopher Robin Original Motion Picture Soundtrack CD Drops on October 27

Sony Classical announces the release of Goodbye Christopher Robin (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) with an original score by Academy Award®-nominated composer Carter Burwell.

The soundtrack will be released digitally on October 13 and on CD on October 27, 2017. The film will be released in the Us on October 13, 2017.

Pre-order here.

Goodbye Christopher Robin is directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn, Woman in Gold) and will be released in Us theaters by Fox Searchlight Pictures on October 13, 2017.

Carter Burwell said about the score:

“One of the riskier decisions Simon Curtis and I made with the score was to withhold the main theme until the middle of the film, when A. A. Milne begins to write and his friend Ernest Shepard begins to illustrate “Winnie The Pooh”. We did this to make that moment especially noteworthy, to make it the turning point of the story. Before that point, the music plays
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Check Out All The Movies and TV Shows Coming to Netflix in October

Netflix has released a list of all of the movies and TV shows that are coming to Netflix in the month of October along with the release dates of them. They've got some good stuff coming including some Netflix originals that I'm excited about seeing including Stranger Things Season 2, Mindhunters, 1922 and more.

Look over al the titles and let us know which titles you're looking forward to seeing. I also provided a lit of everything that's leaving Netflix next month.

Available October 1

88 Minutes

A Cinderella Story: Once Upon a Song

Before Midnight

Blood Diamond

Boogie Nights

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Cleverman: Season 2

Death Sentence

Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood

Eagle vs. Shark

Eyes Wide Shut

Generation Iron 2

Ghost Patrol

I Love You, Man

Ice Guardians

Lockup: Disturbing the Peace: Collection 1

Made of Honor

Miss Congeniality

Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Time to Binge 30 Rock, Because It's Disappearing From Netflix in October

  • BuzzSugar
Netflix giveth, and Netflix taketh away. Though the streaming giant is bestowing upon us a ton of exciting new titles in October (Miss Congeniality! Stranger Things season two!), that also means it has to get rid of a bunch of existing programs to make way. Unfortunately, that means everything from 30 Rock and One Tree Hill to Titanic and The Shining are bidding us all adieu. RelatedHow I Met Your Mother and 30 Rock Are Leaving Netflix Because 2017 Is Total Trash Oct. 1 30 Rock, seasons one-seven A Love in Times of Selfies Across the Universe Barton Fink Bella Big Daddy Carousel Cradle 2 the Grave Crafting a Nation Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest Daddy's Little Girls Dark Was the Night David Attenborough's Rise of the Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates, season one Day of the Kamikaze Death Beach Dowry Law Dr. Dolittle: Tail to the Chief Friday Night Lights, seasons one-five Happy Feet Heaven Knows,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

'Alina': Film Review

'Alina': Film Review
Legendary film exhibitor/producer Ben Barenholtz is widely credited with popularizing the midnight movie concept with his screenings of such cult films as El Topo and Eraserhead at his long-gone Elgin Theater. He’s also produced such films as the Coen brothers’ Miller’s Crossing and Barton Fink. Now, at the age of 82, Barenholt makes his feature film directorial debut with Alina, the sort of micro-budgeted independent feature he might have programmed decades ago. Unfortunately, that same dated feel permeates this earnest effort about a young Russian woman trying to find her father in New York City.

The title character, played by...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Finn's Secret Mission Begins in Latest Look at Star Wars 8

  • MovieWeb
Finn's Secret Mission Begins in Latest Look at Star Wars 8
The Last Jedi throws Finn and newcomer Rose Tico into the world of high-rollers at the Canto Bight Casino in a recently released image from the upcoming movie. The news comes after the announcement that Lucasfilm and Colin Trevorrow have officially parted ways under the creative differences umbrella, which is something that Last Jedi director Rian Johnson claims he never ran into while making his new Star Wars movie. The latest issue of Empire Magazine shares this immersive image of Canto Bight as well as Johnson's experience on working with Disney and Lucasfilm.

Previously we had learned some new information about Poe's alterations to his X-Wing fighter from Empire Magazine and now they're sharing a picture of Finn and Rose in the Canto Bight Casino. According to the article, the scene on the planet Cantonica takes place about midway through Star Wars: The Last Jedi and is said to be
See full article at MovieWeb »

Rian Johnson Had Creative Freedom on The Last Jedi; So Why Are Other Directors Being Let Go For "Creative Differences"?

As you all know by now, it was recently announced that by Lucasfilm that Star Wars: Episode IX director Colin Trevorrow is no longer attached to the project. He was let go because their visions for the project differed. This is one of the reasons used regarding Phil Lord and Chris Miller's departure in the middle of the Han Solo production. Maybe even the reason what Josh T It's pretty clear that these directors didn't have much creative freedom when developing their Star Wars projects.

Because of this, you would think that Lucasfilm has an outline or a formula that directors have to follow, and if the director's vision goes outside of that, then things aren't going to work. Well, according to Star Wars: The Last Jedi director Rian Johnson, that's not the case at all. In fact, it seems like he was given complete creative freedom to do what he wanted.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Rian Johnson Reflects On The Creative Freedom He Enjoyed Upon Approaching Star Wars: The Last Jedi

When one ponders the inner workings of franchise filmmaking, it’s easy to assume that big-name blockbusters in the vein of Star Wars: The Last Jedi follow a strict formula imposed by the Powers That Be.

And though there are examples of studios adhering to a set template (see: the Marvel Cinematic Universe), Rian Johnson, writer-director of The Last Jedi, has recalled the amount of creative freedom he enjoyed upon approaching Episode VIII. Chatting to Empire as part of the outlet’s outgoing Star Wars coverage, the Looper filmmaker admitted that he “wasn’t given an outline” during the formative stages of development, and was instead asked to formulate the next chapter in the Skywalker saga on his own accord.

It’s a modus operandi that echoed Johnson’s days spent working on Brick and The Brothers Bloom, and here, the director recalls the narrative license given to him by Lucasfilm brass.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Sanfic: Alicia Scherson Adapts Roberto Bolaño’s ‘Third Reich’ in ‘1989’ (Exclusive)

Sanfic: Alicia Scherson Adapts Roberto Bolaño’s ‘Third Reich’ in ‘1989’ (Exclusive)
Santiago De Chile — Teaming up with producer Isabel Orellana at Araucaria Cine (“Nunca vas a estar solo”), Alicia Scherson (“Family Life,” “Il Futuro”) is tackling the world of men for the first time in her second adaptation of a Roberto Bolaño novel after “Il Futuro,” her 2013 screen adaptation of the Chilean novelist’s “Una Novelita Lumpen.”

“Most of my films have displayed a more female perspective; it was a challenge to immerse myself in the world of a male, one obsessed with war games, to boot,” said Scherson.

After struggling with the script for a year, changing the original setting from Spain in Bolaño’s novel “The Third Reich” to Chile made all its disparate elements fall into place.

Scherson’s “1989” takes place in Chile during a time of transition after military dictator Augusto Pinochet has stepped down but before a democratic government has established itself.

“It’s a time of great uncertainty, the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Blu-ray Review – Barton Fink: Special Edition (1991)

Barton Fink, 1991.

Directed by Joel Coen.

Starring John Turturro, John Goodman, Judy Davis, Michael Lerner, John Mahoney, and Jon Polito.

Synopsis:

Barton Fink has been reissued by Kino Lorber in a new Blu-ray edition that doesn’t say “Special Edition” anywhere on the packaging but basically is one (hence the use of “(Special Edition)” on their site and here). The print has been improved a bit since the previous Universal release, and Kino commissioned some new interviews that are included here, along with eight deleted scenes.

“I thought it was a strange film,” actor John Turturro recalls in the new 14-minute interview on this Barton Fink (Special Edition) Blu-ray from Kino Lorber. As Coen brothers movies go, this one veers a bit into David Lynch territory as it tells the satirical story of a Broadway playwright seduced by Hollywood’s siren call during the 1940s.

Fink (Turturro) arrives in Los Angeles,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Great Films Unfairly Forgotten in Time

Tom Jolliffe on forgotten films…

Time is a cruel mistress. It’s the one constant and something no one can alter (except Marty McFly and Doc Brown). Looks go, memories fade and in cinematic terms a film can be forgotten over time. Now sometimes it’s probably a good thing. Take for example the turn of the century and the release of Battlefield Earth. One of the undisputed turkeys of modern cinema. An unmitigated disaster on every level. However it’s not one that always springs directly to mind nowadays when people thing of cinematic disasters. In part there’s been even worse since, and on even more bloated budgets. In that respect, time has been a little kind.

However there are a lot of films which were good, great, maybe on occasion cinematically important which have become hazy memories over time. Perhaps they never quite got the recognition or
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites