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An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1991) Poster

Trivia

"Dreams To Dream" was originally recorded by Céline Dion, but the producers favored Linda Ronstadt, who sang the theme song, "Somewhere Out There", in An American Tail (1986).
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John Cleese turned down the role of Cogsworth in Beauty and the Beast to be in this film.
James Stewart's final acting role in a feature film.
Though undetected for decades, there is a penis doodle hidden in the film. It's visible in the DVD and VHS versions. At the 46:20 mark of the film, while Fievel's sister is singing Dreams to Dream, a penis doodle appear's in front of her face for one frame.
When Fievel is riding on the tumbleweed, the "Theme from Rawhide" is being played in the background. It is the version sung by John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd from The Blues Brothers (1980) which features a cameo appearance by Steven Spielberg in it.
Steven Spielberg personally came to James Stewart's sound booth to direct him. He is uncredited as a voice-over director, though.
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Owing to creative differences, Don Bluth parted ways with Steven Spielberg, with whom he had directed the original An American Tail (1986), as well as the first of 13 Land Before Time films. With no Bluth in sight for the sequel, Spielberg instead relied on Phil Nibbelink, a former Disney animator, and Simon Wells, the grandson of science-fiction author H.G. Wells, to direct the project.
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This film was released on the same day (November 22, 1991) as the Walt Disney animated film Beauty and the Beast (1991).
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In An American Tail (1986), Papa Mousekewiz is a tailor, according to the sign over the front door of his house as seen during "Somewhere Out There". In this movie, however, he is a violin maker.
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The song "Dreams to Dream" is based on a theme used in An American Tail (1986). It is heard during Bridget's speech in the market, as well as at the end of the Orphan Alley sequence, as the camera pulls back on the orphaned mice sleeping in the rain.
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It is the sole theatrical sequel to An American Tail (1986), and was followed at the end of the 1990s by another two direct-to-video sequels, both of which took place chronologically before this film.
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In addition to a new voice actress, the character of Tanya was heavily redesigned as well. Tiger had minor changes, as does Yasha (the baby), and Fievel looks slightly different.
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Several of the storefronts and signs in Green River are named for members of the crew: "Ph. Nibbelink Eyeglasses" and "Wells' Dentistry" (directors Phil Nibbelink and Simon Wells); "P. Rappas Clothing", "Dunnet's Bread and Cakes", and "Saint Brendan Holy Chapel" (layout artists Panagiotis Rappas, Dave Dunnet, and Brendan Houghton); and "Woodbyrne Knickers & Garters" (for production manager Cynthia Henrich-Woodbyrne). In addition, one façade in the "Way Out West" sequence reads "Mardegan" (for layout artist Giorgio Mardegan).
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One of the flyers in Miss Kitty's dressing room lists scene planner Harald Kraut as the manager of the "Pine Street Theatre."
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One view of the cats' mousetrap (visible right before Fievel dispatches them at the end) displays a nameplate, facing upside-down, which reads "Made in Acton, London"; this was the location of the Amblimation studio where the film was produced.
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Don Bluth and his animation studio, Sullivan Bluth Studios, were originally going to make the film, as they had done with An American Tail (1986). Universal agreed, under the condition that it would cost no more than $9.6 million, similar to the budget of the first film, but $3 million less than The Land Before Time (1988), which Bluth was already directing for them. Faced with the prospect of having to lay off employees at his studio, Bluth declined the job, and parted ways with Universal after finishing their commitment with "The Land Before Time." Ironically, the film was made for roughly $25 million, twice as much as "Land" had cost to make.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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