The Adjuster (1991) - News Poster

(1991)

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Atom Egoyan Introduces His Film "Calendar"

  • MUBI
Mubi is celebrating Canadian National Film Day, in partnership with Reel Canada, by exclusively showing Atom Egoyan's Calendar (1993). It is playing on Mubi from April 20 - May 19, 2016. Many thanks to the director, who generously has shared this new introduction to his film.Calendar. Photo © Ego Film Arts.It started with a very simple urge: to go there. Though both my parents are Armenian, I was born in Cairo, raised in Canada, and had never visited my “mother country.” In 1991 my fourth feature, The Adjuster, had been invited to the Moscow Film Festival. It won a prize, which included one million rubles (a fortune back then) to make a film somewhere in the Soviet Union. At the time, Armenia was part of the Soviet Union, and this would be my opportunity to go there.Over the next year, as I began to formulate an idea for a film, fate would work against me.
See full article at MUBI »

Marrakech: Atom Egoyan Says He’s Ready To Tackle Sci-Fi And Another Opera

Marrakech: Atom Egoyan Says He’s Ready To Tackle Sci-Fi And Another Opera
Marrakech– Canuck auteur Atom Egoyan, who is attending Marrakech film festival to receive a tribute to Canadian cinema and present his latest film, “Remember,” said he was currently working on a science-fiction project which will likely be produced as a TV series.

Egoyan revealed he was developing an adaptation of science-fiction book about Artificial Intelligence.

“This book looks at the history of Artificial Intelligence from (the point of view of) people who dedicated their lives to artificial intelligence and who have personal needs to find it.”

Added Egoyan, “It becomes very political because artificial intelligence is the next domain. Suddenly there is the possibility of creating beings with brains that are more progressive than ours so it’s gets hugely political.”

The soft-spoken helmer said the sic-fi project was more suited for TV drama than a feature.

Speaking of TV prospects, Egoyan said he experimented television at the beginning of his career.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

2014 Cannes Critics’ Panel Day 2: No Sweet Hereafter Found in Egoyan’s “The Captive” & Ceylan Shines with Gender Role Malaise in “Winter Sleep”

Cannes – Friday May 16th

The first title out of the gate at this morning’s 8:30 a.m. showing was the first of three Canadian films in the Main Competition. Snatched up earlier by the A24 folks, starring Ryan Reynolds, Scott Speedman, Rosario Dawson and Mireille Enos, The Captive landed mostly 2 star notes with our panel, unfortunately making Atom Egoyan’s kidnapping thriller the first misfire of the fest. Winner of the Grand Prix and the International Critic’s Prize by the F.I.P.R.E.S.C.I.for The Sweet Hereafter in 1997, the Canuck has been at the fest’s Directors’ Fortnight for Speaking Parts (1989) and The Adjuster (1991) and found a home in the official selections for six features: Exotica (1994), Felicia’s Journey (1993), Ararat (2002 – Out of Comp), Where the Truth Lies (2005) and 2008′s Adoration.

Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s over three hour dialogue driven drama occupied a one time showing 3:00 p.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Captive’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Captive’
Atom Egoyan’s 14th feature tells a tale of lost children and grieving parents unfolding under wintry gray skies, but otherwise we’re about as far removed from the mastery of “The Sweet Hereafter” as we could be in “The Captive,” a ludicrous abduction thriller that finds a once-great filmmaker slipping into previously unentered realms of self-parody. Attempting to meld his traditional preoccupations with guilt and bereavement, voyeuristic technology and achronological storytelling with a “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit”-style procedural, Egoyan leaves a strong cast flailing to keep up with a contrived and fatally unconvincing drama that makes the recent “Prisoners” look like a masterpiece in retrospect. News of the film’s acquisition by U.S. distrib A24 broke shortly before its press screening at Cannes, where it was greeted with a smattering of boos; beyond the Croisette, mass indifference rather than contempt seems the likely reaction.

It’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Captive,’ the latest feature from Atom Egoyan, releases its first trailer

Could this be a return to form for Atom Egoyan? Following the announcement of its official selection for this year’s Cannes film festival, the first trailer for Egoyan’s The Captive is online, and it looks like a tense, psychological thriller.

Since hitting his stride in the 90s with a series of multi-faceted, insightful dramas—Speaking Parts, The Adjuster, Exotica, The Sweet Hereafter, Felicia’s Journey, Ararat—Egoyan has hit a slump in regard to critical acclaim for his more recent work. But hopefully “The Captive” will put the major Canadian filmmaker—and former Cannes winner—back on the map. The plot, which involves the disappearance of a little girl and her subsequent re-surfacing eight years later on an unknown web-feed, seems like a good fit for the veteran director.

The film also stars Ryan Reynolds, Rosario Dawson, Mireille Enos, Scott Speedman, and Egoyan preferred actor, Bruce Greenwood.

Source:
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Tiff 2011: The Rest of the Canadian Line-up Brings Maddin, Vallée, McDonald, Pool, Veninger, and A Wealth of Shorts and First-Timers

With big names like Cronenberg and Polley already announced a couple of weeks ago, it came time this morning to announced the rest of the home team for the Toronto International Film Festival. This morning, they filled in some of the gaps in the Special Presentations, Vanguard, and Real to Reel sections, and at the same time presented the full line-ups for their Canada First! and Short Cuts programmes, the former highlighting feature debuts, and the latter comprised of a whopping 43 Canadian short films running anywhere from 4 to 28 minutes long. We saw the announcements of Maddin's Keyhole and Vallée's Venice Days entry Café de Flore coming from a mile away. Invariably, almost all any given year's Canada's Top Ten list (a prestigious, juried selection of the ten best Canadian films of the year) have appeared somewhere in Tiff's Canadian categories. Also from Venice, we have the non-Canadian helmer Mary Harron
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Minority View: Exotica by Atom Egoyan

Although Canada was long ignored as a film producing country, it has produced the English-speaking world’s two greatest filmmakers after 1990. If one of these is David Cronenberg, the other is Atom Egoyan, who, like David Lynch, is an artist whose work is compelling but also bewildering. If Lynch’s films attain their effects partly through Angelo Badalamenti’s music, Egoyan has had an equally important collaboration with composer Mychael Danna. The difference is perhaps that while much of Lynch’s cinema is surreal in some sense, many of Egoyan’s films – the earlier ones – are dominated by the absurd. If the ‘surreal’ is more striking, flamboyant and/or wildly comic, the ‘absurd’ is wrier. Both strive for truths that go beyond the ‘real’ but while the ‘surreal’ seeks out metaphysical and/or social truths the ‘absurd’ attempts to find truths of a personal and/or psychological nature.

Although Egoyan
See full article at DearCinema.com »

Maury Chaykin obituary

Actor who was at his best in shadowy roles

The actor Maury Chaykin, who has died aged 61 after a heart-valve infection, was an American and a Canadian citizen, and his career reflected his dual nationality. In the Us, he was a familiar face, if not a recognisable name, playing small but telling roles in major films. His breakthrough came in Dances With Wolves (1990), playing Major Fambrough, who sends Kevin Costner on his frontier assignment and then kills himself. Chaykin's only leading role was in the cable TV series A Nero Wolfe Mystery (2001), as the titular detective who refuses to leave his house, delegating that to his assistant (Timothy Hutton).

In Canada, Chaykin was something of a national treasure. He won a Genie award for best actor for his performance as a Brian Wilson-like burned-out rock star in Whale Music (1994), gave remarkable performances in three films directed by Atom Egoyan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Casting Notes: Elias Koteas in Winnie; Jon Tenney in Green Lantern; Fred Ward in 30 Minutes or Less; Jessica Chastain in The Help

Casting Notes: Elias Koteas in Winnie; Jon Tenney in Green Lantern; Fred Ward in 30 Minutes or Less; Jessica Chastain in The Help
Elias Koteas has never been one of the more high-profile character actors out there, but he's always one of my favorites. (Not because of The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, where he played Casey Jones, but for films like Crash and The Adjuster.) Directors like David Fincher and Martin Scorsese have started using Koteas, which has increased his profile, and now he's cast in Winnie, the biopic about Winnie Mandela. He joins Terrence Howard and Jennifer Hudson, who play Nelson and Winnie Mandela. Koteas will be De Vries, "an overzealous officer in the apartheid police stage who rises in power and becomes intent on stopping Winnie and the black anti-apartheid activists from gaining power." So not a role that audiences will look kindly on, but a major role. I'll take it. [THR] After the break, Green Lantern gets a dad and Fred Ward and Jessica Chastain book new roles. Green Lantern is
See full article at Slash Film »

Movie Preview & Trailer: Chloe (2010), Starring Julianne Moore, Amanda Seyfried, Liam Neeson

  • ScreenStar
Dr. Catherine Stewart (Julianne Moore) thinks her handsome husband David (Liam Neeson) is cheating on her. He's out of town a lot. He's a professor with lots of pretty young students vying for his attention (and more). Catherine and David rarely make love anymore, and the passion is so out of the relationship that they don't even pick each other up from the airport these days, something they did in the past when they couldn't stand to be apart for another moment. Determined to uncover the truth, Catherine turns to a sexy, smokey-eyed escort named Chloe (Amanda Seyfried). Chloe's misson? To seduce David and report back to Catherine. Only things don't go quite as planned. Chloe describes every intimate moment of her trysts with David, recounting them in disturbingly vivid detail. At once mortified, angry, embarrassed, and turned on, Catherine winds up in bed with Chloe. The real drama starts,
See full article at ScreenStar »

Movie Preview & Trailer: Chloe (2010), Starring Julianne Moore, Amanda Seyfried, Liam Neeson

  • ScreenStar
Dr. Catherine Stewart (Julianne Moore) thinks her handsome husband David (Liam Neeson) is cheating on her. He's out of town a lot. He's a professor with lots of pretty young students vying for his attention (and more). Catherine and David rarely make love anymore, and the passion is so out of the relationship that they don't even pick each other up from the airport these days, something they did in the past when they couldn't stand to be apart for another moment. Determined to uncover the truth, Catherine turns to a sexy, smokey-eyed escort named Chloe (Amanda Seyfried). Chloe's misson? To seduce David and report back to Catherine. Only things don't go quite as planned. Chloe describes every intimate moment of her trysts with David, recounting them in disturbingly vivid detail. At once mortified, angry, embarrassed, and turned on, Catherine winds up in bed with Chloe. The real drama starts,
See full article at ScreenStar »

The double life of Atom Egoyan

One minute he's making uneasy arthouse films, the next he's a Hollywood gun for hire, shooting the likes of Liam Neeson. Can auteur Atom Egoyan really cope with a dip in the mainstream?

A year is a long time in the movies. Fifteen months ago, I met the Canadian film-maker Atom Egoyan as he brought his low-key indie Adoration to the London film festival. The venue was an anonymous hotel cafe. At the festival's next edition, Egoyan returns with a new film, Chloe; this one stars Julianne Moore, Liam Neeson and Amanda Seyfried, and Egoyan is holding forth in a suite at Claridge's in central London. Things have clearly gone well for him.

At our first enconter, in the cafe, Egoyan was nursing a hangover that made him pleasantly effusive. He wasn't what I expected. Even his actors can be confused; before starting work on Adoration, one of its leads,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Egoyan has 'Adoration' for New Technology

  • As part of the special Cannes short film collection known as Chacun son cinema, in his 3 minute short film titled Artaud double bill, Atom EgoyanAtom Egoyan
[/link] takes The Adjuster and inserts the camera cellphone as a method in which to communicate. His newest project seems to be headed in the same sort of direction. Screen Daily reports that Egoyan is set to shoot his next project Adoration in September with longtime friend Robert Lantos of Serendipity Point Pictures on board as executive producer. LATimes quoted the filmmaker about his newest, "Adoration's' basically about kids redefining themselves through the Internet. At less than 5 million, the extremely low-budget film looks at how students interact with the www and tells a story that is set in the near-future and involves a high school student who creates an online avatar that stimulates a real-life community of mourners for a fictional catastrophe. Though Alison Lohman
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

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