Screen Two (1985–2002)
7.3/10
49
2 user 2 critic

102 Boulevard Haussmann 

In 1916 author Marcel Proust is leading a reclusive life in Paris. He hires a quartet of musicians and befriends one of them, a wounded serviceman.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Celeste
...
...
Odilon
Gillian Martell ...
Concierge
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Amable Massis
Philip McGough ...
Dr. Bize
Philip Rham ...
Gaston Poulet
Peter Geeves ...
Louis Ruyssen
Michael Wilcox ...
Victor Gentil
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Mme Massis
Lesley Nightingale ...
Princess Soutzo
Michael Grandage ...
...
Head Waiter
Ben Buckton ...
Petain (as Benjamin Buckton)

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In 1916 author Marcel Proust is leading a reclusive life in Paris. He hires a quartet of musicians and befriends one of them, a wounded serviceman.

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historical event | See All (1) »

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Drama

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17 February 1991 (UK)  »

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Quotes

Marcel Proust: I apologize for the lift. It dates from the period before lifts were invented.
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Soundtracks

Sonata In A Major
(uncredited)
Music by César Franck
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User Reviews

 
Strong performances, a quiet, subtle script
17 February 2013 | by (US) – See all my reviews

A terrific, performance by Alan Bates and strong supporting ones by Janet McTeer and Paul Rhys anchor this quiet, understated study of a few months in the life of writer Marcel Proust during WW I.

This Proust is fragile and eccentric, ironically seemingly blithely disconnected from the sufferings of those around him, while at the same time writing his works of insight into the human mind and heart. Yet, as the film goes on, we become more aware that Proust's seeming lack of empathy is as much a defense mechanism against his own sadness and loneliness as they are an unintentional cruel streak.

The piece is by nature a bit chilly, and the emotions to be found are of the quiet, subtle variety. Yet there is also something haunting about it in the end. It's one of those pieces that's lingered in my mind more strongly and positively than I would have expected based on my more mixed reaction while watching it.


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