Forrest Bedford is a Southern lawyer in the late 1950s, generally content with his privileged life. But the winds of change are blowing, and he becomes increasingly involved with civil ... See full summary »
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2   1  
1993   1992   1991  
Won 2 Golden Globes. Another 31 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Forrest Bedford (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 Lilly Harper (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 Nathaniel 'Nathan' Bedford (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 Francie Bedford (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 John Morgan Bedford (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 Christina LeKatzis (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
Peter Simmons ...
 Paul Slocum (38 episodes, 1991-1993)
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 Adlaine Harper (19 episodes, 1991-1993)
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Storyline

Forrest Bedford is a Southern lawyer in the late 1950s, generally content with his privileged life. But the winds of change are blowing, and he becomes increasingly involved with civil rights cases. Mean- while, Lilly Harper, who cares for his children, is on her own journey of political and personal awareness. Written by Cleo <frede005@maroon.tc.umn.edu>

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Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

7 October 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Io volerò via  »

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 »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The state in which the series takes place is never identified by name, nor through any identifying characteristics. Characters refer to counties rather than parishes, thus eliminating Louisiana. Characters also speak of Texas, Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, and Mississippi, thus presumably eliminating them. We later learn that Forrest works in the Fifth District. If this refers to the Fifth Circuit of Courts, then the setting is most likely Georgia, as every other state in that district has been referred to. See more »

Quotes

[Francie and John Morgan are fighting in the back seat]
D.A. Forrest Bedford: If I have to stop this car somebody's going to regret it!
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Connections

Followed by I'll Fly Away: Then and Now (1993) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Second Best Show Ever
19 May 2006 | by (Morning Sun, Iowa) – See all my reviews

My comment is simple. My favorite TV show ever (and I go back to about 1962 or 63 for television) is "Homicide: Life on the Street." Number two is "I'll Fly Away." It's just a masterpiece. I believe this is the first "10" I've ever given anything.

It's been awhile, so I'll forget some characters' names, and I'm too lazy to hit the back button and open a new window here. The youngest son was one those exceedingly rare little-kid characters in television or movies who acts precisely his age, as opposed to an obnoxious seven-going-on-seventeen. Francie was adorable and winning as his older sister and, again, absolutely believable as being her correct age, and in going through the crises of her particular age.

The actress who played Lily (I've got to hit that back button), their "colored" maid and the center of the cast, was the gem of the show. As so often happens, though, she never seemed to get anywhere after "I'll Fly Away." I thought for sure we had a real up-and-comer there. (And as I recall, so did many critics).

And oh yes, Sam Waterston had a life before "Law & Order" for you kiddies out there. To a degree I still think of Jack McCoy as the guy from "I'll Fly Away." Nowadays on television, his character's relationship with Lily, the maid, would be riddled with politically correct sensibilities, which is to say it would be pandering, one-dimensional and cloying. But no, Waterston is not some cartoonishly "evolved" white good guy; he's a convincingly complex southern liberal in the 1950s. At any rate, the relationship between Lily and Waterston's character is rich to watch unfold.

Is it out there somewhere on DVD or video? If so, rent it and get caught up in it like you would an HBO series. The story lines are continuous for the most part. The ratings for "I'll Fly Away" were just about zero for the first of its two season, on ABC, but it was one of those occasional noble instances by a network where they renew a losing show purely on the basis of its unanimous critical acclaim.


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