7.4/10
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32 user 16 critic

The Nasty Girl (1990)

Das schreckliche Mädchen (original title)
PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama, History | March 1991 (USA)
When a young woman investigates her town's Nazi past, the community turns against her.

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 11 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lena Stolze ...
Hans-Reinhard Müller ...
Juckenack
Monika Baumgartner ...
Sonja's mother
Elisabeth Bertram ...
Sonja's grandma
Michael Gahr ...
Paul Rosenberger
Robert Giggenbach ...
Martin
Fred Stillkrauth ...
Sonja's uncle
Barbara Gallauner ...
Miss Juckenack
Udo Thomer ...
Archivist Schulz
Ludwig Wühr ...
Owner of the Swingboat
Christof Wackernagel ...
Zöpfel
Richard Süßmeier ...
The Mayor
Sandra White ...
Iris
Rudolf Klaffenböck ...
The judge
...
Nina
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Storyline

Sonja is a German high school student who participates in a writing contest and endeavors to write an essay about her town's history during the Third Reich and its resistance to it. To her dismay, and more so the town's, she uncovers instead definite collaboration during the period. As she digs deeper, she must struggle against the town's vocal and violent opposition to her search for the truth. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | History | War

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

March 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Nasty Girl  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$2,281,569
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Germany's official submission to the 1991's Oscar in the Best Foreign Language Film category. See more »

Quotes

Local Doctor: If I'd known you'd be famous, I'd have preserved your appendix in alcohol.
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Connections

Spoofed in How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Enjoyed the very different approach to tough topic
17 February 2001 | by See all my reviews

At points this film feels almost comic, but never loses its focus on the important topic of Germans either coming to grips with the past or covering it up. Some modernist filming techniques seem to remind the viewer that the film is very much set in the time of its production (1990, though the story begins in the 1970s) rather than in the distant, black-and-white days of the past that is its most important subject. It's like Verhoeven is saying "the cover-up is NOW."

It is my understanding that the story is based on the experiences of an actual German woman. That being the case, Verhoeven could have written a serious biographical film about this woman's experiences as she struggled to investigate the truth of her town's activities during the Nazi regime. This was the method used in his portrayal of the Scholl siblings in Die Weisse Rose. But I can see reasons for his different approach with this film. The topic of Die Weisse Rose is so heavy for obvious reasons, and there is very little modern controversy over considering them heroes. But as the topic of Das schreckliche Maedchen remains controversial and, for many Germans, difficult to discuss, the somewhat light-hearted approach that Verhoeven takes may open doors for more viewers and more discussion. And again I repeat that the approach does not diminish the topic's importance. He strikes a nice balance.

On another note, this film is also a very good portrayal about a modern woman's struggle to be independent in her work while having a large family. I'm not surprised to see that the positive voting here at IMDB is most prevalent among women in their twenties and thirties.


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