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‘Designated Survivor’ Season 2 Adds ‘Parenthood’ Alum Bonnie Bedelia

‘Designated Survivor’ Season 2 Adds ‘Parenthood’ Alum Bonnie Bedelia
Designated Survivor” Season 2 has cast Bonnie Bedelia in a recurring role, Variety has learned.

Bedelia will play Eva Booker, the President’s mother-in-law. Widowed 20 years ago, she is fiercely devoted to her daughter (Natascha McElhone) and grandchildren, and an unabashed fan of her son-in-law. She spent her career working as a secretary to a Department of Defense contracting officer.

Bedelia previously starred as Camille Braverman on the hit NBC series “Parenthood.” Her additional credits include feature films “Die Hard” and “Die Hard 2,” “Presumed Innocent,” and “Heart Like a Wheel.” She is reped by Innovative Artists and Howard Entertainment.

Designated Survivor’s” first season proved to be a hit for ABC. The show put up solid numbers in the Live+Same Day ratings, but showed impressive growth in delayed viewing week after week. The series stars Kiefer Sutherland, McElhone, Adam Canto, Italia Ricci, Kal Penn, Tanner Buchanan, Ben Lawson, Lamonica Garret, and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Blood test: match the red stuff to the film – quiz

As Iggy Pop stars in the violent thriller Blood Orange this week, test your knowledge about how many bloody scenes you recognise for past films

Blade

Resident Evil

Let Me In

Saw III

The Talented Mr Ripley

Basic Instinct

American Psycho

Presumed Innocent

28 Days Later

Dawn of the Dead

The Thing

The Ruins

Friday the 13th

Body Double

Dressed to Kill

Black Christmas

Falling Down

Society

Hellraiser

The Stepfather

Cabin in the Woods

30 Days of Night

Kill Bill: Volume One

Hot Fuzz

Pacific Heights

Cape Fear

Single White Female

Consenting Adults

Death Proof

Gone Girl

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

Let the Right One In

Suspiria

Halloween

An American Werewolf in London

Misery

It Follows

The Blue Lagoon

Deep Blue Sea

Castaway

8 and above.

Red looks good on you

0 and above.

That was a bit bloody tough for you

4 and above.

Bleedin' hard huh?

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Misconduct’

Film Review: ‘Misconduct’
Faint echoes of decades-old thrillers as diverse as “Fatal Attraction” and “Presumed Innocent” abound through “Misconduct,” a flagrantly derivative but modestly diverting drama of the sort that once claimed acres of shelf space at Blockbuster outlets. Anthony Hopkins and Al Pacino saunter through the proceedings while picking up easy paychecks and providing marquee allure, but it’s up to the top-billed Josh Duhamel to do most of the heavy lifting in this neo-noir scenario about an ambitious lawyer who bends the rules during litigation against a corrupt pharmaceutical tycoon, only to become entangled in at least two conspiracies. Limited theatrical play will be a mere formality, as is usually the case for such VOD-ready fare.

Duhamel plays Ben Cahill, a corner-cutting up-and-comer at a New Orleans law firm who’s worried about his wife, Charlotte (Alice Eve), a registered nurse who recently suffered a miscarriage, and now appears to be channeling her grief into workaholism.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

6 Reasons Harrison Ford Should Get An Oscar Nod For Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Harrison Ford – actor, pilot, notorious grumpus – has never won an Oscar. Allow that to sink in for a moment, as you think back to the many less deserving peope that have taken a prize before he’s even come close (Cuba Gooding Jr, anyone?). Ford has been nominated before – once, for Best Actor for Witness – but has won absolute bupkis from the Academy Awards in all his years as a movie star.

There were no nominations for Indiana Jones or The Fugitive, nor for his less blockbustery, more dramatic turns, in The Mosquito Coast or Presumed Innocent. And not ever for playing Han Solo. Well, now is the Academy’s chance: Star Wars: The Force Awakens is out and has just made it in for Oscar eligibility, right at the tail-end of the year, while Ford is happily drawing praise for his fourth run at the bat as Solo.

More
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Competition: Win two Warner Bros. Blu-ray boxsets!

On November 2nd, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (Wbhe) release the Johnny Depp: 4 Film Collection, two coming to Blu-ray for the first time, and the Harrison Ford: 5 Film Collection, three of which are also brand new to Blu-ray! To celebrate, we have Blu-ray copies to giveaway!

The Johnny Depp 4 Film Collection sees the actor starring alongside Charlize Theron, Helen Bonham Carter, Michelle Pfieffer, Alan Rickman and screen legend Marlon Brando in films including The Astronaut’s Wife, Dark Shadows, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, and Don Juan DeMarco.

The Harrison Ford 5 Film Collection sees the actor starring alongside Tommy Lee Jones, Julianne Moore, Alan Arkin, Virginia Madsen and John C. McGinley in films including Firewall, 42, Presumed Innocent, Frantic and The Fugitive.

Order today: Johnny Depp 4 Film Collection | Harrison Ford 5 Film Collection

© 2015 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved.

To win copies of both Blu-ray boxsets, just
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Giveaway – Win Johnny Depp / Harrison Ford Blu-ray collections

On November 2nd, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (Wbhe) release the Johnny Depp: 4 Film Collection, two coming to Blu-ray for the first time, and the Harrison Ford: 5 Film Collection, three of which are also brand new to Blu-ray!

To celebrate, we have Blu-ray copies to giveaway!

The Johnny Depp 4 Film Collection sees the actor starring alongside Charlize Theron, Helena Bonham Carter, Michelle Pfieffer, Alan Rickman and screen legend Marlon Brando in films including The Astronaut’s Wife, Dark Shadows, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, and Don Juan DeMarco.

The Harrison Ford 5 Film Collection sees the actor starring alongside Tommy Lee Jones, Julianne Moore, Alan Arkin, Virginia Madsen and John C. McGinley in films including Firewall, 42, Presumed Innocent, Frantic and The Fugitive.

Order today!

Johnny Depp 4 Film Collection: http://amzn.to/1WdnlOc

Harrison Ford 5 Film Collection: http://amzn.to/1LwFCOx

The competition closes at midnight on Sunday,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

"Lovers And Other Strangers" 45th Anniversary Screening, L.A., May 20

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Cy Howard’s 1970 film Lovers and Other Strangers, which stars Bea Arthur, Bonnie Bedelia, Michael Brandon, Anne Jackson, Diane Keaton, and Cloris Leachman, celebrates it’s 45th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 104-minute comedy on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 7:30 pm. Scheduled to appear in person are actress Bonnie Bedelia, Cloris Leachman and the Oscar-nominated co-writers Joe Bologna and Renee Taylor for a post-screening Q&A with film critic Stephen Farber.

From the press release:

Lovers And Other Strangers was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1970 and won the Oscar for best original song, "For All We Know." This sharp and poignant comedy examines the relationships of a dozen characters involved in preparing for a family wedding. The superb ensemble cast includes Oscar winners Gig Young, Cloris Leachman, and Diane Keaton (in her first
See full article at CinemaRetro »

A Brief (Pun Intended) History Of Lawyers In The Movies Part II

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise...

1. Devil’s Advocate (1997)

Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can’t refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

The 35 Greatest Murder Mystery Movies Ever Made

Murder mysteries are so commonplace on TV that each week offers seemingly dozens of them on police procedural series and detective shows. But in the movies, whodunits are surprisingly rare, and really good ones rarer still. There's really only a handful of movies that excel in offering the viewer the pleasure of solving the crime along with a charismatic sleuth, often with an all-star cast of suspects hamming it up as they try not to appear guilty.

One of the best was "Murder on the Orient Express," released 40 years ago this week, on November 24, 1974. Like many films adapted from Agatha Christie novels, this one featured an eccentric but meticulous investigator (in this case, Albert Finney as Belgian epicure Hercule Poirot), a glamorous and claustrophobic setting (here, the famous luxury train from Istanbul to Paris), and a tricky murder plot with an outrageous solution. The film won an Oscar for passenger
See full article at Moviefone »

‘A Good Marriage’ Trailer Teases the First of Four Stephen King Adaptations Over the Next Year or So

It’s only been ten months since a Stephen King film was playing in theaters, but we’re already just two months away from the next. Once upon a time that year-long wait between adaptations would have seemed crazy– back in the ’80s and early ’90s there were frequently two or three of them in the multiplexes simultaneously – but he hasn’t been nearly as ubiquitous onscreen in the 21st century. There have only been nine feature films based on his work since 2000, and pretty much only one of them is worth a damn. His latest stab at the box-office is A Good Marriage, a film written by King from his own short story. The always fantastic Joan Allen plays a woman who discovers her loving husband (Anthony Lapaglia) may just be a serial killer. There’s no shortage of movies about couples, secrets and the possibility that one of them might be a murderer, but
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'Godfather" D.P. Gordon Willis, Hollywood's Prince of Darkness, dies at 82

  • Hitfix
'Godfather
One of the most joyous sequences in American film is the opening of Woody Allen's "Manhattan." As Allen's character Isaac speaks in voice-over, Gershwin's remarkable "Rhapsody In Blue" plays. "Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. No, make that… he romanticized it all out of proportion. Better. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin. Mm. No. Let me start this over." Don't bother, Woody. You got it right the first time, and to provide that black-and-white counterpoint to the soaring sounds of Gershwin, cinematographer Gordon Willis shot some of the greatest images of New York City ever burned onto celluloid. Black-and-white felt like a perfect form of expression for Willis, who was referred to by many filmmakers as "The Prince Of Darkness,
See full article at Hitfix »

'Godfather" D.P. Gordon Willis, Hollywood's Prince of Darkness, dies at 82

  • Hitfix
'Godfather
One of the most joyous sequences in American film is the opening of Woody Allen's "Manhattan." As Allen's character Isaac speaks in voice-over, Gershwin's remarkable "Rhapsody In Blue" plays. "Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. No, make that… he romanticized it all out of proportion. Better. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin. Mm. No. Let me start this over." Don't bother, Woody. You got it right the first time, and to provide that black-and-white counterpoint to the soaring sounds of Gershwin, cinematographer Gordon Willis shot some of the greatest images of New York City ever burned onto celluloid. Black-and-white felt like a perfect form of expression for Willis, who was referred to by many filmmakers as "The Prince Of Darkness,
See full article at Hitfix »

Gordon Willis: The Man who Shot the Seventies

“If a director is smart, he’ll give me the elbow room to paint.” So said Gordon Willis, who worked with some very clever directors indeed, who let him “paint” some of the most beautiful and influential movies of the 1970s and made an incalculable contribution to the Golden Age of New Hollywood. The sad news of his death yesterday at the age of 82 has robbed the world of one of the most important artists of the past fifty years.

Nicknamed ‘The Prince of Darkness’ by his fellow cinematographer Conrad Hall, Willis’s trademark was his use of shadows, not just in the composition of scenes but on actors’ faces. The interior scenes in The Godfather (1972) typify this stark technique, as do the underground car park scenes in All The President’s Men (1976), where Hal Holbrook’s “Deep Throat” is rendered faceless by Willis’s photography.

However, he was fond
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Bates Motel Season 2 Episode 7 – Presumed Innocent

  • HeyUGuys
While the most recent episodes have focused on world building and excelling in its character evolution, this week finally saw more of a focus on Norman and how the death of Cody’s father at his hands would affect him and those around him. We expected a shift to come at this stage of the game, with only three episodes remaining, but Presumed Innocent lets the ball drop.

Following the accidental death of Cody’s father, Norman and his recent romance are taken in by the police for questioning. Norman, having recently experienced more blackouts than ever before, is in a precarious position as the mere mention of his recent bout of dazed violent swings could spell arrest.

After Norma discovers her son’s latest situation, she rushes to find out more from Sheriff Romero and plead with Cody not to mention her son’s blackouts. Elsewhere in White Pine Bay,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Bates Motel season 2 episode 8 review: Meltdown

Several plots begin to converge as we approach the season climax. Here’s Michael’s review...

Review

This review contains spoilers.

2.8 Meltdown

‘You should talk to your son’. Nick Ford has a neat way with dishing out advice. His approach, which he demonstrated with Norma and both of her sons, is to make it sound like a threat. It’s easier, I suppose, if you’re used to making pretty much everything sound like a threat and it’s hard to escape that supposition with the rich and strange Mr Ford.

His rather singular manner was useful this week, helping to bring together the disparate storylines, or should that be knocking them together through quietly insistent force. His confident, demanding stride into Norma’s office at the beginning of the episode signalled his intention to be regarded as a man who cannot be ignored. Every trace of sweetness in his approach was now drained.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blue Ruin and the brilliance of the low-budget thriller

Feature Ryan Lambie 8 May 2014 - 07:11

Thrillers may be increasingly rare in Hollywood, but the genre continues to thrive in the hands of great indie filmmakers, Ryan writes...

Fatal Attraction. Presumed Innocent. Basic Instinct. Double Jeopardy. They’re all Hollywood thrillers of the 80s and 90s, and were all, to a greater or lesser extent, sizeable box-office hits. It’s easy to forget, in the current era of superhero-led blockbusters, that the humble thriller was once a go-to genre for Hollywood - its mid-budget bread and butter which could reliably turn a profit in both theatres and on VHS (or later, DVD).

The past 20 years, however, have seen a sizeable shift in the way Hollywood makes and sells its films. There’s an increased need to hook the biggest possible audience in on a movie’s opening weekend, resulting in a greater emphasis on loud, flashy moments which can be
See full article at Den of Geek »

TV Review: Bates Motel: Season 2, Episode 7: Presumed Innocent [A&E]

A&E’s Bates Motel Presumed Innocent TV Show Review. Bates Motel: Season 2, Episode 7: Presumed Innocent was subliminally reflective of the fact that up to now, Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) has consistently been presented as the victim throughout the series. A very unique and fresh perspective from Hollywood. I [...]

Continue reading: TV Review: Bates Motel: Season 2, Episode 7: Presumed Innocent [A&E]
See full article at Film-Book »

Bates Motel Recap: “Meltdown”

Though every episode of Bates Motel features a certain amount of damp and gloom, "Meltdown" was a particularly dark hour. White Pine Bay seems to be in the midst of a very rainy week, and that darkness (the interior of Dylan's office, the Bates' home, characters only seeming to move around at night) was an integral part of of "Meltdown's" tone, and a reflection of the inner lives of those on screen. Things are at a low point, and to steal a line from Game of Thrones: "the night is dark and full of terrors." Hit the jump for why "everything has changed." "Meltdown" was a good bridge between last week's water-treading "Presumed Innocent" and next week's intense penultimate episode "The Box." The hour was filled with plot points, primarily moving Dylan into a position where both Jody (the Morgan Family boss) and Nick Ford (the Ford Family boss
See full article at Collider.com »

Bates Motel episode 7 review: Presumed Innocent

Review Michael Noble 16 Apr 2014 - 11:56

Patience and restraint are two of Bates Motel's chief virtues. Here's Michael's review of another steady episode...

This review contains spoilers.

2.7 Presumed Innocent

One of the aspects of Bates Motel that I enjoy the most is the (relatively) low bodycount. For a show that centres on a serial killer, albeit one who is still very much serving his apprenticeship, there is an admirable restraint in the way it portrays Norman's steady descent into infamy. It’s testament to the smartness of the show’s writers that they focus on the character’s situation and changing emotional circumstances rather than attempting to shock the viewer with ever more gruesomely inventive (and grimly implausible) murder scenes. This is shown both narratively, such as in the presentation of Norman’s fugue states (and his loved ones’ failure to understand them) and structurally, such as in this
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bates Motel: Go Inside Ep. 2.07 - Presumed Innocent; See a Preview of Ep. 2.08 - Meltdown

"Meltdown" seems to be an appropriate title for next week's Ep. 2.08 of "Bates Motel" as numerous characters seem to be on that path. Here's a preview of the season's final three episodes along with a quick look "inside" last night's Ep. 2.07, "Presumed Innocent."

In the exclusive behind-the-scenes clip from "Presumed Innocent" you'll see moments from the episode and listen in as the cast and creators discuss the tough good-bye, Romero's new lead, and the growing rift.

"Bates Motel" stars Vera Farmiga as Norma, Freddie Highmore as Norman, and Max Thieriot as Dylan.

"Bates Motel" Episode 2.07 - "Presumed Innocent" (aired 4/14/14)

Zane (Michael Eklund) threatens Dylan; Norman questions Norma's faith in him.

"Bates Motel" Episode 2.08 - "Meltdown" (airs 4/21/14)

Romero (Nestor Carbonell) digs for the truth behind Miss Watson’s murder while the war between the drug families presents Dylan with an impossible choice. Norman pushes Norma away when she won’t tell
See full article at Dread Central »
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