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Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Devil Wears Prada’: A look back at her 14th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 14 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

The three years following “Adaptation” (2002) did not produce an Oscar nomination for Meryl Streep – her longest drought since the early 1990s, following “Postcards from the Edge” (1990). That is not to say, of course, that these years were without substantial Streep contributions to the big and small screens and stage.

Sans a brief cameo portraying herself in the Matt DamonGreg Kinnear conjoined twins comedy “Stuck on You,” Streep did not grace the silver screen in 2003. She did, however, hit the television circuit in a big way with her reunion alongside filmmaker Mike Nichols on the HBO production of Tony Kushner‘s “Angels in America.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Bridges of Madison County’: A look back at her 10th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Bridges of Madison County’: A look back at her 10th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 10 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After steamrolling through the 1980s, racking up half a dozen Best Actress Oscar nominations, Meryl Streep experienced a more subdued reception in the early 1990s.

The decade started off on just the right note, with a ninth Oscar nomination for “Postcards from the Edge” (1990). Streep also garnered praise for her turn opposite Albert Brooks in “Defending Your Life” (1991). The picture, however, was not a box office success, drawing roughly the same interest in theaters as “She-Devil” (1989), which was deemed a bomb upon its release.

Streep’s next project was among her most ambitious to date – a big-budget horror-comedy from filmmaker Robert Zemeckis,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep’s real-to-reel portrayal of Katharine Graham adds to Oscars record that will never be matched

Meryl  Streep’s real-to-reel portrayal of Katharine Graham adds to Oscars record that will never be matched
Everyone knows that Meryl Streep, a current Best Actress nominee for “The Post,” is the Secretariat of the Oscar nominations race. Her 21 combined lead and supporting actress bids put her nine lengths ahead of runners-up Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson and 11 ahead of legends Bette Davis and Sir Laurence Olivier.

But in a race within a race that has gotten less attention, Streep has an even greater lead: in nominations for roles based on real people. The number is either 10 or 11 depending on whether you agree with the fashion world and me that she plays a thinly-veiled version of Vogue’s Queen of Mean editor Anna Wintour in “The Devil Wears Prada.”

Streep, in fact, has more nominations for playing historical figures than any other major actor has even attempted. Hepburn, the most heralded and honored actress before Streep came along, played only a half-dozen real life characters in her long career,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Postcards from the Edge’: A look back at her ninth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Postcards from the Edge’: A look back at her ninth Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 9 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

By 1989, Meryl Streep had graced the silver screen in 15 motion pictures. Thirteen of these were dramas, with the exceptions being “Manhattan” (1979), in which Streep had a small supporting role, and “Heartburn” (1986), a critical and financial failure. So, it was about time that Streep at last scored a leading role in a successful comedy.

She-Devil” (1989) found Streep in the broadest, loosest form of her career. Portraying flamboyant romantic novelist Mary Fisher, opposite Roseanne Barr, Streep herself garnered positive notices but the picture flopped even harder than “Heartburn,” spending one week in the box office top 10.

Her follow-up to “She-Devil” had shades of “Heartburn” on paper.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Meryl Streep movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Is Meryl Streep the greatest film performer of all time? According to Oscar voters over the past 40 years, that might just be the case with her record shattering 21 nominations and 3 wins. She earned her latest bid for the 2017 film “The Post” for portraying “Washington Post” publisher Kay Graham in the Steven Spielberg movie. Where does her latest entry rank in her filmography? Tour through our photo gallery above of Streep’s 25 greatest performances ranked from worst to best.

Streep snagged her first Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for “The Deer Hunter” (1978) and picked up her first trophy in that category the very next year for “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979). She subsequently snagged two prizes in the lead category (“Sophie’s Choice” in 1982 and “The Iron Lady” in 2011) and competed 17 more times: Best Actress for “The French Lieutenant’s Woman” (1981), “Silkwood” (1983), “Out of Africa” (1985), “Ironweed” (1987), “A Cry in the Dark” (1988), “Postcards from the Edge
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination

Meryl Streep Breaks Own Record With 21st Oscar Nomination
Meryl Streep has broken her own Oscar record.

The actress received her 21st Academy Award nomination, in the best actress category, for her performance as Katherine Graham in “The Post.”

The nod extends Streep’s record by nine over Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson, who are tied in second place with a dozen each.

Streep has won Oscars for “Kramer vs. Kramer” in 1979, “Sophie’s Choice” in 1982, and “The Iron Lady” in 2011. She’s received four nominations since then for “August: Osage County,” “Into the Woods,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” and now “The Post.”

Streep also nabbed a Golden Globe nomination for best actress in a drama for “The Post,” but lost to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” star Frances McDormand.

Her performance as the widowed Graham has been widely praised for its nuance as her character deals with the fallout from her 1971 decision for The Washington Post to publish the Pentagon Papers in the face of opposition
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meryl Streep Hilariously Fails at Naming All 20 of the Films That Earned Her Oscar Nominations

Meryl Streep Hilariously Fails at Naming All 20 of the Films That Earned Her Oscar Nominations
Meryl Streep holds the record for the most Academy Award nominations of any actor, but can she list all 20 of the films she earned nods for?

Jimmy Kimmel challenged the three-time Oscar winner, 68, to name all of the movies she was nominated for in 60 seconds during Monday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and the results were hilarious.

“If you’re able to name them, I will give you this bonus Oscar,” the late-night host, who is hosting this year’s awards show, told Streep.

The Post star kicked off the game on a strong start, naming The French Lieutenant’s Woman,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Star Wars, Episode IX’: 8 Huge Questions J.J. Abrams’ Film Will Have to Answer After the Events of ‘The Last Jedi’

‘Star Wars, Episode IX’: 8 Huge Questions J.J. Abrams’ Film Will Have to Answer After the Events of ‘The Last Jedi’
As the latest chapter in the ever-expanding “Star Wars” universe, Rian Johnson’s blockbuster hit “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” flipped the script on more than a few favored fan theories, pushing the newest trilogy even further into fresh territory and unanswered questions. When “The Force Awakens” director J. J. Abrams returns to direct the latest film in the series, he’ll be expected to contend with some major shifts to characters and storylines.

What’s next for “Star Wars”? At this point, just about anything.

Read More:The 5 Biggest Spoilers in ‘The Last Jedi’ and What they Mean for the Future of ‘Star Wars

Still, there are a number of loose threads – perhaps the appropriate amount considering the trilogy style of these films – that Abrams will have to tie up during the course of his still-untitled “Episode IX.” From the fate of beloved characters to lingering mysteries and everything in between,
See full article at Indiewire »

James Franco Will Direct and Star in a Shel Silverstein Biopic

  • Indiewire
James Franco Will Direct and Star in a Shel Silverstein Biopic
Now that he’s done playing Tommy Wiseau, James Franco is turning his attention to a much less disastrous artist: Shel Silverstein. Deadline reports that the multi-multi-hyphenate is now in talks to both direct and star in a biopic about the children’s author, songwriter, poet, and cartoonist, whose books have adorned many a classroom for decades.

Read More:James Franco Recreated 25 Minutes of ‘The Room’ Shot-for-Shot in ‘The Disaster Artist

Chris Shafer and Paul Vicknair are writing the as-yet untitled project, which is based on the Lisa Rogak book “A Boy Named Shel.” Deadline’s report notes that the film “will focus on the personal and professional struggles that made Silverstein a unique voice.”

Read More:James Franco Reveals Why He Became ‘Frustrated’ After 10 Years of Acting and Had to Do More — Watch

Silverstein, who was born in 1930 and died in 1999, is best known for books like “The Giving Tree,
See full article at Indiewire »

Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season

Four Mother-Daughter Movies Could Dominate Awards Season
Mother-daughter relationships have always been the stuff of great drama. And the Oscars are no exception. Three decades ago the “Moonstruck” acting duo Olympia Dukakis and Cher both won gold for playing a strong-willed New York Italian mother and her feisty daughter. Six years later, as a mute Scottish teacher and her de facto interpreter in New Zealand, Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin repeated that twofer triumph with Jane Campion’s “The Piano.”

Onscreen mother-daughter conflict has resulted in other dual Academy Award nominations: selfless Barbara Stanwyck tricked Anne Shirley into marrying rich in tearjerker “Stella Dallas” (1937); Meryl Streep’s big mouth inspired a rebellious Julia Roberts in “August: Osage County” (2013); Piper Laurie was literally crucified by Sissy Spacek in “Carrie” (1976). At the start of this decade, Mo’Nique won an Oscar portraying the sexually abusive parent of fellow “Precious” nominee Gabourey Sidibe. Back in 1984, both Shirley MacLaine and
See full article at Indiewire »

Postcards from the Edge is One Great Classic Film

Postcards from the Edge is a 1990 comedy-drama film directed by Mike Nichols and starring Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine. The screenplay is written by Carrie Fisher which is based on her semi-autobiographical novel of the same title. The film is about the story of Suzanne Vale, a Hollywood actress who is a recovering drug addict. As she exits from rehab, she has to stay with her mother Doris in order to be part of the movie that she wants to be in. Now, she has to maintain her sobriety and sanity as she stays with Doris, who

Postcards from the Edge is One Great Classic Film
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Billie Lourd Reflects on Life Advice, Humor From Mother Carrie Fisher

Billie Lourd Reflects on Life Advice, Humor From Mother Carrie Fisher
Billie Lourd opened up about the sudden loss of her mother Carrie Fisher and grandmother, Debbie Reynolds, for the first time in the new cover story for Town & Country.

"Now, looking back and watching her interviews, I try to model what I do after her," Lourd said speaking of her mother's remarkable honesty. "She was so good at it. She would get so annoyed with me if I ever did a fake interview. She'd say, 'Tell the real story.'"

Like her mother, Lourd was raised with famous parents. But according to Lourd,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

CCH Pounder to Return for ‘Avatar’ Sequels

CCH Pounder to Return for ‘Avatar’ Sequels
CCH Pounder will reprise her role as the spiritual leader Moat in the four upcoming “Avatar” sequels.

Pounder currently portrays Dr. Loretta Wade on the CBS series “NCIS: New Orleans.” She’s also appeared in the TV shows “Sons of Anarchy,” “ER,” “The Shield,” and “Warehouse 13.” Aside from “Avatar,” her films include “Orphan,” “Postcards From the Edge,” “Prizzi’s Honor,” “Face/Off,” and “Mortal Instruments: City of Bones.”

The four “Avatar” sequels will hit theaters starting on Dec. 18, 2020, for “Avatar 2.” “Avatar 3” will open on Dec. 17, 2021, followed by a three-year break for “Avatar 4,” set for Dec. 20, 2024. “Avatar 5” will then debut on Dec. 19, 2025.

Cameron announced at CinemaCon in 2016 that he would make four “Avatar” sequels, promising that the films would start hitting theaters in 2018. The creator of the original “Avatar” — the 2009 fantasy epic that remains the all-time worldwide box office champion with $2.8 billion — said at the time that his vision for the story had
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Family Guy’ Comic-Con Panel Pays Tribute to Adam West and Carrie Fisher; Here’s Who Will Replace Her as Peter Griffin’s Boss

  • Indiewire
‘Family Guy’ Comic-Con Panel Pays Tribute to Adam West and Carrie Fisher; Here’s Who Will Replace Her as Peter Griffin’s Boss
Family Guy” has tapped Bryan Cranston and Niecy Nash to play Peter Griffin’s new boss, filling the void left by the death of Carrie Fisher.

Fisher, who died in December, had occasionally voiced Peter’s boss, Angela, on the show since 2005. Cranston and Nash will play a husband and wife duo on the show.

The casting was announced by executive producer Rich Appel during “Family Guy’s” San Diego Comic-Con panel on Saturday. The always raucous panel started off on a somber note, as creator Seth MacFarlane and the show’s cast and producers offered their memories of Fisher and Adam West, who played the mayor of Quahog.

MacFarlane remembered West as someone who “had boundless energy and instantly put everyone in a good mood… The man gave 150 percent right up to the end,
See full article at Indiewire »

Meryl Streep’s Best Movie Lines

Meryl Streep’s Best Movie Lines
Over her storied career, Meryl Streep has racked up dozens of film credits going back to the ’70s, scored a record-breaking 20 Oscar nominations (along with three wins), and, of course, delivered golden line after golden line.

With the actress turning 68 on Thursday, Variety decided it was as good a time as any to look back at some of Streep’s best lines, from the funny to the sassy to the downright inspirational.

“How do I look?” — Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Following a divorce, and nasty custody battle complete with character assassination and conflicted emotion, Streep as Joanna Kramer seals her first Oscar win with a question — “How do I look?” — as she boards an elevator to see her son.

“The dingo took my baby!” – “Cry in the Dark” (1988)

Often misquoted as “A dingo ate my baby,” Streep’s exclamation after a wild dog snatches her infant from a tent, delivered in a flawless Australian accent, has become part of pop culture. Elaine made it a memorable put-down in a “Seinfeld” episode.

“I’m not a box. I don’t have sides. This is it. One side fits all.” — “Postcards From the Edge” (1990)

In “Postcards From the Edge,” Meryl Streep is Carrie Fisher’s muse, and embodies the late Hollywood royal in all her snarky, unpredictable, and out-of-control glory. With this line, Streep’s Suzanne Vale snaps back at her love interest Jack Faulkner (Dennis Quaid) to make sure he knows exactly where they stand.

“I am a righteous bitch, aren’t I?” — “Dancing at Lughnasa” (1998)

In the long history of Streep delivering flawlessly sassy lines, let no one forget her 1998 role in period film “Dancing at Lughnasa,” where she played Kate “Kit” Mundy. After her sister Aggie (Brid Brennan) declares, “Do you ever listen to yourself, Kate? You are such a damned righteous bitch,” Streep’s Kit can only delightfully agree.

“That is what we do. That is what people do. They stay alive for each other.” — “The Hours” (2002)

In one heartbreaking scene of “The Hours,” Streep, who plays New Yorker Clarissa Vaughan, has a candid conversation with the AIDs-striken Richard (Ed Harris), who asks her why he should even stay alive, if not for her.

“The assassin always dies, baby. It’s necessary for the national healing.” — “The Manchurian Candidate” (2004)

Meryl Streep played U.S. Senator Eleanor Prentiss Shaw, the manipulative mother of Liev Schreiber’s Raymond Shaw. She perfectly embodies the ruthless nature of her character when she delivers the difficult truth to her son.

Various — “Devil Wears Prada” (2006)

Where to even start with Streep’s endlessly quotable performance as Miranda Priestly? At the end, of course, with the line that the actress brilliantly tweaked during the table read from “Everybody wants to be me” to “Everybody wants to be us.” With this statement we realize how much Andy (Anne Hathaway) has changed (and, really, how much we all have). Some of Streep’s greatest lines stem from her impatient snark (“By all means, move at a glacial pace. You know how that thrills me.”) And she has a certain specialty in the way she delivers questions (“Why is no one ready?”; “Florals? For spring? Groundbreaking.”). But the line that defines Streep’s performance, is the two-word dismissal that becomes her refrain: “That’s all.”

“I have doubts… I have such doubts.” — “Doubt” (2008)

Meryl Streep allows the veneer of stern self-assurance in her character, Sister Aloysius Beauvier, to crack in a moment of emotional release. “I have doubts … I have such doubts,” she breaks down about her ability to expose Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman), and her faith in the church at large.

“If what I think is happening is happening … it better not be.” — “Fantastic Mr. Fox” (2009)

Meryl Streep is the matriarch in Wes Anderson’s endlessly quirky and quippy animated masterpiece — stern and even, and a foil for her rambunctious husband voiced by George Clooney. In this scene she calls out his tomfoolery: “If what I think is happening,” she says, and the camera closes in on her judgmental gaze. “… it better not be.”

“These damn things are as hot as a stiff c—!” – “Julie and Julia” (2009)

Meryl Streep totally nailed TV chef Julia Child’s breathy and sometimes risqué enthusiasm, as in this scene where she pulls two large cannellonis from boiling water using her bare hands.

“We will stand on principle, or we will not stand at all.” — “The Iron Lady” (2011)

Streep’s performance as Margaret Thatcher earned her her most recent Oscar, and it’s easy to see why. When she tells Alexander Haig (Matthew Marsh) about why she will go to war with Argentina in an empassioned speech, it’s hard not to get chills.

“Is anybody supposed to smoke?” — “August: Osage County” (2013)

Streep played the delightfully sardonic Violet Weston in John Wells’ adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play. Her response to Ivy’s (Julianne Nicholson) quite obvious question is only one of many memorable lines from the drama (though not uttered by Streep, who can forget Julia Roberts’ “Eat the fish, bitch”?)

What’s your favorite Meryl Streep movie line? Let us know in the comments below!

Related storiesMeryl Streep, Judith Light, Lena Dunham, More Tell Sheila Nevins' Stories in New AudiobookRobert De Niro Calls Out Trump Administration's 'Bulls--' While Accepting Career Achievement AwardSteven Spielberg Pentagon Papers Drama Gets 2017 Oscar-Season Release
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles

  • PEOPLE.com
Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles
Last year, Meryl Streep received her 20th Academy Award nomination for her performance in Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep’s nod makes her the most nominated performer in Oscars history.

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat (which she celebrated with an epic gif of her dancing; see below), we’re looking back at the roles that got her the accolades.

via Giphy

(We’re just as excited as you, Meryl!)

1979: The Deer Hunter

Though she didn’t win for her turn as the girlfriend of a fallen soldier in Vietnam, the role helped establish Streep as one to watch in the awards show game,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Carrie Fisher Had Heroin, Cocaine in System When She Died, Report Reveals — As Daughter Billie Releases Emotional Statement

  • PEOPLE.com
Carrie Fisher Had Heroin, Cocaine in System When She Died, Report Reveals — As Daughter Billie Releases Emotional Statement
Carrie Fisher had heroin and cocaine in her system at the time of her death, according to her toxicology report.

People obtained official documents from the Los Angeles County coroner’s office on Monday that reveal the late actress had cocaine, methadone, ethanol and opiates in her system when she passed away at the age of 60 in December.

“The exposure to cocaine took place sometime approximately in the last 72 hours of the sample that was obtained,” stated the report.

The report also stated that Fisher had a “remote exposure to Mdma,” which is a commonly known as ecstasy.

The toxicology
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Carrie Fisher’s Brother Todd Says He’s ‘Not Shocked’ By Her Cause of Death

Carrie Fisher’s Brother Todd Says He’s ‘Not Shocked’ By Her Cause of Death
Carrie Fisher‘s brother, Todd, is speaking out on the cause of his sister’s death due to sleep apnea and other undetermined factors, the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office revealed Friday.

“We’re not enlightened,” Todd told the Associated Press. “There’s nothing about this that is enlightening.”

“I would tell you, from my perspective that there’s certainly no news that Carrie did drugs,” he continued. The Star Wars actress was direct and forthcoming about her struggle with bipolar disorder and substance abuse issues, which began when she was 13.

The coroner said Fisher suffered from atherosclerotic heart disease and “drug use,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Carrie Fisher Died of Sleep Apnea and Used Drugs, Report Reveals — as Daughter Billie Releases Emotional Statement

  • PEOPLE.com
Carrie Fisher Died of Sleep Apnea and Used Drugs, Report Reveals — as Daughter Billie Releases Emotional Statement
Carrie Fisher’s death was caused by sleep apnea and other undetermined factors, the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office revealed on Friday, according to multiple reports.

The coroner also said Fisher suffered from atherosclerotic heart disease and “drug use,” but no specifics were given. According to the Associated Press, the report stated Fisher had taken multiple drugs prior to her death.

“The manner of death has been ruled undetermined,” the report concluded.

In an exclusive statement to People, Fisher’s only child, Billie Lourd, addressed the report.

“My mom battled drug addiction and mental illness her entire life. She ultimately died of it.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Film Review: ‘Snatched’

Film Review: ‘Snatched’
Amy Schumer is one of those rare comic artists, like Louis C.K. or Chris Rock, who can get you laughing out loud at reality. Two years ago, she carried that scorched-earth impulse right into her first movie, the fearlessly funny and close-to-the-bone “Trainwreck.” Written by Schumer herself, and directed by Judd Apatow, it was the most audacious romantic comedy in years — and the most satisfying, too — because it touched a nerve of almost masochistic sincerity. In “Snatched,” her first movie since “Trainwreck,” Schumer gets cast as a loser who’s even further down on the totem pole of respectability. It’s a sign of Schumer’s rapport with the audience that in the opening scene, where she appears to be playing the most annoying off-the-rack clothing-store customer in history (it turns out she’s actually the sales person), the deeper the hole she digs for herself, the more we like her.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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