Mountains of the Moon (1990) - News Poster

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15 Electrifying Musical Performances from Hugh Hefner's Playboy After Dark

  • PEOPLE.com
15 Electrifying Musical Performances from Hugh Hefner's Playboy After Dark
It’s difficult to find an aspect of popular culture that Hugh Hefner didn’t influence during his long, remarkable life. Spanning journalism, television, film, fashion and, of course, sexuality, his impact on music is one of the least heralded aspects of his legacy. Over the course of two seasons, Hefner used his weekly syndicated variety show, Playboy After Dark, as a platform for a broad spectrum of artists.

Psychedelic sounds from San Fransisco (courtesy of the Grateful Dead), early heavy metal (provided by Deep Purple), country-tinged balladeers (thanks to Linda Ronstadt and the Byrds) and old-school crooners (like the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Lost City of Z

They don’t make ’em like this any more, and the original TV spots for James Gray’s accurate retelling of history almost didn’t know how to sell it. Charlie Hunnam spends his life trying to solve a riddle of the Peruvian rainforest, in between fighting in WW1 and dealing with class prejudice. Yup, one could say the picture was filmed in a ‘classic’ style . . . can a show like that find an audience these days?

The Lost City of Z

Blu-ray

Broadgreen / Amazon Studios

2016 / Color / 2:39 widescreen / 141 min. / Street Date July 11, 2017 / 34.99

Starring: Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller, Tom Holland, Edward Ashley, Angus Macfadyen, Ian McDiarmid, Clive Francis, Murray Melvin.

Cinematography: Darious Khondji

Film Editor:John Axelrad, Lee Haugen

Original Music: Christopher Spelman

From the book by David Grann

Produced by Dede Gardner, James Gray, Anthony Katagas, Jeremy Kleiner

Written for the Screen and Directed by James Gray

More
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Game Of Thrones Actor Peter Vaughan Has Passed Away

  • DailyDead
Some very sad news is being reported today, as actor Peter Vaughan has passed away at the age of 93.

BBC News and multiple other sources shared this statement from Vaughan's agent, Sally Long-Innes:

"This is to confirm that very sadly Peter Vaughan passed away at approximately 10.30 this morning. He died peacefully with his family around him."

Many modern-day viewers know Vaughan as Maester Aemon on Game of Thrones, but his screen career stretches back to the ’50s.

A highly-regarded character actor, Vaughan's credits include Village of the Damned (1960), Two Living, One Dead, Die! Die! My Darling!, Haunted, Treasure Island (1968), Sudden Terror, Porridge, Brazil, Mountains of the Moon, Dandelion Dead, Murder Most Horrid, The Crucible (1996), and the aforementioned Game of Thrones.

Vaughan's legacy will surely live on through the people he worked with, the fans who admired his work, and his incredible presence onscreen. Our thoughts go out to Vaughan's
See full article at DailyDead »

J.K. Rowling Reveals More 'Harry Potter' Wizarding Schools

  • MovieWeb
J.K. Rowling Reveals More 'Harry Potter' Wizarding Schools
Harry Potter fans have something to truly get excited about this morning. Franchise creator and book author J.K. Rowling has revealed the name and location of the American school of Witchcraft and wizardry located in this fantasy world. That's not all, though. She's also announced that there are a total of 11 magic schools in this universe, including the famed Hogwarts Academy.

J.K. Rowling has written the script for the Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which takes place years before Harry ever arrived at Hogwarts. And the action takes place in the United States. New York to be exact. In expanding this universe for the big screen and other forms of media, J.K. Rowling shared a series of posts on her Harry Potter website Pottermore. There she states the following.

"The wizarding populations of most countries choose the option of home schooling. Occasionally, too, the magical
See full article at MovieWeb »

Remembering the First and Only Arab World Movie Star Known Around the Globe

Omar Sharif in 'Doctor Zhivago.' Egyptian star Omar Sharif, 'The Karate Kid' producer Jerry Weintraub: Brief career recaps A little late in the game – and following the longish Theodore Bikel article posted yesterday – below are brief career recaps of a couple of film veterans who died in July 2015: actor Omar Sharif and producer Jerry Weintraub. A follow-up post will offer an overview of the career of peplum (sword-and-sandal movie) actor Jacques Sernas, whose passing earlier this month has been all but ignored by the myopic English-language media. Omar Sharif: Film career beginnings in North Africa The death of Egyptian film actor Omar Sharif at age 83 following a heart attack on July 10 would have been ignored by the English-language media (especially in the U.S.) as well had Sharif remained a star within the Arabic-speaking world. After all, an "international" star is only worth remembering
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two Unsung Gems On TCM This Week

Two films, made decades apart, that deserve to be better known are playing on Turner Classic Movies this week: King Vidor’s The Stranger’s Return (1933), which airs on Tuesday, and Bob Rafelson’s Mountains of the Moon (1990), on Friday. I’ve written about the Vidor film before, most recently when it screened at this year’s TCM Classic Film Festival. I first saw it decades ago, when William K. Everson showed a 16mm print, and fell in love with it then. It’s a surprisingly adult film for its time, and showcases Miriam Hopkins, Lionel Barrymore, and Franchot Tone in tailor-made roles, alongside a fine supporting cast. Vidor never mentioned it in his autobiography, and I always...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Watch a supercut of some of cinematographer Roger Deakins' best work

  • Hitfix
Watch a supercut of some of cinematographer Roger Deakins' best work
I've spent the better part of the last few months diving into the catalog of cinematographer Roger Deakins, starting with Michael Radford's "Nineteen Eighty Four" and soaking up each and every indelible image he's given us over the last three decades. I imagine I'll write something up soon enough, as he'll surely be in the thick of things again this season with his work on Angelina Jolie's "Unbroken," but in the meantime, here's a delicious video exploration of some of his work. The video — pieced together by Plot Point Productions — leans heavily on the latter-day stuff. Lots of "No Country," "Jesse James," "Revolutionary Road," "Jarhead," "True Grit," etc. Probably that's because all of those are available in higher definition formats, but it would be great to see more of the striking imagery from "Sid and Nancy" or "Kundun" or little-seen stuff like "Mountains of the Moon" slip in.
See full article at Hitfix »

The rise and fall of Carolco

  • Den of Geek
Feature Ryan Lambie 11 Mar 2014 - 05:39

In the late 80s, Carolco was one of the biggest studios in Hollywood, but by 1995, it was gone. Ryan charts its dramatic rise and fall...

Paul Verhoeven is not a happy man. It's 1994, and the Dutch director of (among other things) RoboCop and Total Recall is in a pivotal meeting with executives at Carolco Pictures. They're in the boardroom to discuss Crusade: a lavish, $100m historical drama described as Spartacus meets Conan.

With a script by Walon Green (The Wild Bunch, WarGames), and a cast headed up by Arnold Schwarzenegger, it sounds like the kind of star-filled, opulent film Carolco Pictures is famous for making. The supporting cast includes Jennifer Connelly and Robert Duvall. The script is vibrant and brash. There are massive sets being built in rural Spain. But privately, Carolco's bosses are anxious; they have another hugely expensive project in the works
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1990

  • Den of Geek
Odd List Simon Brew Ryan Lambie 19 Sep 2013 - 07:20

From dramas to action and everything in between, here's our pick of 20 underrated films from 1990...

Think back to the big films of 1990, and you'll probably immediately come up with things like Ghost, the year's top-grossing film, or maybe Home Alone, which made a star out of the young Macaulay Culkin.

If you're into sci-fi or action, you might pluck Total Recall, Back To The Future Part III or even Die Hard 2 out of your memory banks. But what about all those movies that didn't make it into the year's top 10 ranking films? As ever, there's a huge number of duds and forgettable flops, but there were plenty of films that were wrongly overlooked, too.

That's where this list comes in, which aims to shed a bit of light on 20 films that were either unfairly overlooked by audiences at the time, or
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 20 underrated films of 1990

  • Den of Geek
Odd List Simon Brew Ryan Lambie

From dramas to action and everything in between, here's our pick of 20 underrated films from 1990...

Think back to the big films of 1990, and you'll probably immediately come up with things like Ghost, the year's top-grossing film, or maybe Home Alone, which made a star out of the young Macaulay Culkin.

If you're into sci-fi or action, you might pluck Total Recall, Back To The Future Part III or even Die Hard 2 out of your memory banks. But what about all those movies that didn't make it into the year's top 10 ranking films? As ever, there's a huge number of duds and forgettable flops, but there were plenty of films that were wrongly overlooked, too.

That's where this list comes in, which aims to shed a bit of light on 20 films that were either unfairly overlooked by audiences at the time, or have faded rapidly from general discussions about cinema.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Five Forgotten Gems From Five Great Movie Music Composers

  • SoundOnSight
Anybody who has ever been to a high school reunion (and I’ve been to my share) will tell you that the calendar and the clock can be incredibly cruel (particularly when combined with the long-term effects of gravity, but let’s not go there).

Time punishes creative works as well. Some work grows dated, stale, stiff. Time and the evolving form of the given art leaves a once vibrant and exciting work behind looking dead and obsolete.

More cruel, perhaps, is work that is simply…forgotten. Not for any good reason. Good as it was, maybe it was simply not successful enough to lodge very deeply in the popular consciousness; working well enough in its day, but soon lost among the ever-growing detritus of a lot of other pieces of yesterday.

Movie music is particularly vulnerable to the cruelties of time. Outside of the form’s devotees, it rarely
See full article at SoundOnSight »

2012 Lausanne Underground Film Festival: Official Lineup

The 11th annual Lausanne Underground Film Festival is packed to the gills with outrageous cinema from all over the world, featuring several filmmaker retrospectives and movies screening in competition at several locations on Oct. 17-21.

The big guest of honor this year is the legendary John Waters, who will be attending the fest with several of his own classics, such as Pink Flamingos, Female Trouble and Desperate Living, as well as showing some of his favorite B-movie inspirations, such as William Girdler’s blaxploitation demonic possession flick Abby, Armando Bo’s Argentinian sexploitation Fuego, Robinson Devor’s controversial bestiality doc Zoo and more. Plus, Waters will perform his acclaimed “This Filthy World” one-man show.

Other Luff special guests include Christoph Schlingensief, the confrontational German filmmaker of 100 Years of Adolf Hitler, The German Chainsaw Massacre, The 120 Days of Bottrop and more; Richard Stanley, the South African genre filmmaker of the cult
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Fiona Shaw: 'I'm not frightened of hard words'

From performing Coleridge's maritime epic to creating a coastal art-and-poetry installation with glowing tents, True Blood star Fiona Shaw is on a mission to make us love language.

Given the context for my interview with Fiona Shaw, my central question – what is your favourite love poem? – doesn't seem especially tricky or prying. We meet to talk about Peace Camp, an art collaboration with director Deborah Warner and composer Mel Mercier, for which Shaw has been darting across the UK, imploring people to record their favourite love poems – and accosting well-known actors she's bumped into at airports. "Alun Armstrong! Please, will you do it?" She has recorded 570 poems in total, with voices from Cornwall, Northumberland, Wales, the Isle of Skye, and everywhere in between.

And yet Shaw is not easy to pin down. Her words keep hurtling off through exclamations, exhortations, then collapsing in laughter. She revises herself regularly, shouting into my dictaphone: "Don't write that!
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Fiona Shaw: 'I'm not frightened of hard words'

From performing Coleridge's maritime epic to creating a coastal art-and-poetry installation with glowing tents, True Blood star Fiona Shaw is on a mission to make us love language.

Given the context for my interview with Fiona Shaw, my central question – what is your favourite love poem? – doesn't seem especially tricky or prying. We meet to talk about Peace Camp, an art collaboration with director Deborah Warner and composer Mel Mercier, for which Shaw has been darting across the UK, imploring people to record their favourite love poems – and accosting well-known actors she's bumped into at airports. "Alun Armstrong! Please, will you do it?" She has recorded 570 poems in total, with voices from Cornwall, Northumberland, Wales, the Isle of Skye, and everywhere in between.

And yet Shaw is not easy to pin down. Her words keep hurtling off through exclamations, exhortations, then collapsing in laughter. She revises herself regularly, shouting into my dictaphone: "Don't write that!
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Game of Thrones, Episode 9

Weighing in at just over 800 pages, A Game of Thrones is full of plots and sub-plots, primary and secondary (and tertiary and ancillary) characters, major and minor leitmotifs, and foreshadowing of foreshadowing – to say it is a dense narrative is an understatement in the extreme, particularly considering its status as only the inaugural chapter of a much larger tale. This column (It Is Known: An Analysis of Thrones) will act as a companion piece to both series, novel and television, analyzing each installment’s character beats and plot points as well as scrutinizing the transition from page to script. What it will not do is spoil the story; the hope and intent is elucidation, not ruination.

With one further episode this season, and a second year already greenlighted (and the much-anticipated and oft-delayed fifth book, A Dance with Dragons, due to release immediately following the season finale), such illumination will be needed.
See full article at Corona's Coming Attractions »

Inception's Wally Pfister Wins Asc Award

Leonardo DiCaprio in Christopher Nolan's Inception Inception's Wally Pfister, not True Grit's Roger Deakins as many had been expecting, was the feature film winner at the 2011 American Society of Cinematographers Awards held on Sunday (Feb. 13) night at the Hollywood & Highland Grand Ballroom in Los Angeles. "Presenter Diane Lane was def. surprised by Pfister's Asc win," tweeted TheWrap's Steve Pond. "I think she figured there was a reason ([husband] Josh Brolin/True Grit) they chose her." Deakins had won a BAFTA earlier in the day (evening in London), and shortly before Pfister was announced as the Asc's winner Deakins had been handed the Society's Lifetime Achievement Award. Among the veteran cinematographer' credits are Mountains of the Moon, Dead Man Walking, Thunderheart, Fargo, A Beautiful Mind, and No Country for Old Men. It's unclear whether Deakins will repeat his BAFTA feat or if Pfister will repeat his Asc feat at
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Topics/Questions/Exercises Of The Week—23 April 2010

  • MUBI
All The Critics Love You In [Name Of European City Here]:

"It is just a little bit weird that if I appear in Europe, anywhere, and I go often—to teach, to festivals, when and where there are retrospectives of my work (I’ll go almost anywhere I’ve never been before, because I like to travel)—that I find a great deal of interest in my work. On the other hand these pictures are never discussed, never shown, nor are the other filmmakers involved in them...in America. Which led me to develop a kind of 'Fuck America' attitude. They don’t want to have anything to do with me, I won’t have anything to do with them."

—Director Bob Rafelson, in conversation with the author, 4/9/10

"[Henri] Langlois had been struck with admiration for Hawks in 1928—in the silent days, the antiquity of film—when, at the age of 15, he saw Louise Brooks
See full article at MUBI »

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