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'Fargo': A Guide to the Show's Coen Brothers' References

'Fargo': A Guide to the Show's Coen Brothers' References
There's a moment early in the new season premiere of the FX crime drama Fargo when a parole officer recalls how he met his fiancée, a slick hustler named Nikki Swango (played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead). As the episode flashes back to Nikki at a police station, getting booked and photographed, fans of filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen might experience some deja vu. The situation, the way it's shot, and even the way the crook gets yanked around by the authorities – it's all right out of the Coens' 1987 comedy Raising Arizona.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jon Polito, Big Lebowski and Homicide Star, Passes Away at 65

  • MovieWeb
Jon Polito, Big Lebowski and Homicide Star, Passes Away at 65
Beloved character actor Jon Polito, best known for his work with the Coen Brothers and on the hit NBC series Homicide: Life On the Street, passed away this morning at the age of 65. He died at City of Hope Hospital in Los Angeles from cancer complications. The actor was diagnosed with multiple myeloma six years ago, a disease that affects bone marrow plasma cells.

Deadline reports that the actor's family confirmed his passing on Friday. Jon Polito was born December 29, 1950 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. He attended Villanova University on a drama scholarship before starting his acting career on and off Broadway in New York. He won an Obie Award for five different performances during the off-Broadway season in 1979-1980, before transitioning into film and TV work in 1981 with a role in The Gangster Chronicles.

Jon Polito first started working with the Coen Brothers in 1990's Millers Crossing, followed by Barton Fink the next year.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Jon Polito, Coen Brothers Character Actor, Dead at 65

Jon Polito, Coen Brothers Character Actor, Dead at 65
Jon Polito, a character actor known for his long association with the Coen Brothers as well as memorable roles on Seinfeld, Modern Family and Homicide: Life on the Streets, died Thursday night, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 65. Polito, who was diagnosed with melanoma in 2008 and recently suffered an infection following a surgery, slipped into a coma Sunday and was taken off life support Thursday evening.

Polito's friend, director John McNaughton, also confirmed the actor's death on Facebook. "Very sad to learn that my dear friend and collaborator,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jon Polito -- Dead at 65

  • TMZ
Jon Polito -- best known for his roles in Coen Brothers films like "The Big Lebowski" and "Miller's Crossing" -- died Thursday night after being taken off life support ... according to family sources. We're told Jon was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2008 -- he was also suffering from arthritis and had an infection related to a recent surgery. He slipped into a coma last Sunday. Director John McNaughton broke the news Friday morning -- "Jon
See full article at TMZ »

Big Lebowski Jesus Spin-off Secretly Shooting in New York?

  • MovieWeb
Big Lebowski Jesus Spin-off Secretly Shooting in New York?
The Coen Brothers are not known for making sequels to their movies, and have made it quite clear that the prospect doesn't interest them very much. But that doesn't mean we won't ever see some of their beloved characters return. In fact, we may finally be seeing some characters from The Big Lebowski make their way back to the big screen in the near future. How, you may ask? Well, It looks like a new spinoff movie involving John Turturro's character Jesus Quintana is currently being filmed in New York.

A new report from Birth.Movies.Death claims that the movie Going Places, which he is currently filming and is said to be a remake of a 70s French movie, is actually a Big Lebowski spinoff. The script was reportedly written by Turturro himself, and he has assembled a cast that includes Bobby Cannavale, Audrey Tautou and Susan Sarandon.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Ava DuVernay Original Prison Documentary Set To Open The 54th New York Film Festival

  • LRM Online
The Film Society of Lincoln Center announces Ava DuVernay’s documentary The 13th as the Opening Night selection of the 54th New York Film Festival (September 30 – October 16), making its world premiere at Alice Tully Hall. The 13th is the first-ever nonfiction work to open the festival, and will debut on Netflix and open in a limited theatrical run on October 7.

Chronicling the history of racial inequality in the United States, The 13th examines how our country has produced the highest rate of incarceration in the world, with the majority of those imprisoned being African-American. The title of DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing film refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution—“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States . . . ” The progression from that second qualifying clause to the horrors of mass incarceration and
See full article at LRM Online »

Why FX's 'X-Men' spin-off 'Legion' won't be tied to the movies

  • Hitfix
Why FX's 'X-Men' spin-off 'Legion' won't be tied to the movies
Yesterday was a big day for Noah Hawley. Before the Fall, his fifth book — and his first since becoming the award-winning creator and showrunner of FX's Fargo — debuted to rave reviews(*) and a spot at the top of Amazon's bestseller list. And FX chose Hawley's publication date to officially order Legion — an X-Men spin-off of sorts (in the comics, the character is Professor X's son, but the show won't be connected to the films at all) starring Dan Stevens, Aubrey Plaza, Jean Smart, and Rachel Keller — to series. (*) I raced through my copy of the book — which cuts back and forth between the story of a man who survived a plane crash and the backstories of the passengers who died — then went back and reread large chunks of it again and again. It's fantastic. Part of Hawley's day involved an appearance at Word Bookstore in Jersey City, where we talked
See full article at Hitfix »

'Fargo': 10 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Coen Brothers' Classic

  • Moviefone
Has it really been 20 years since the release of "Fargo?" Yah, you betcha.

The snowbound crime comedy-drama, released March 8, 1996, marked the first mainstream smash for Joel and Ethan Coen. It also gave Frances McDormand and William H. Macy their signature roles, spawned the acclaimed FX drama series, and sparked a brief fad that had everyone talking with exaggerated Minne-soh-ta accents.

Still, two decades after the film's debut, there's still a lot of confusion about what in "Fargo" was truth, what was fiction, and what was an elaborate in-joke. Here, then, are the far-fetched facts behind the film.1. The opening title card claims the movie is based on a true story, but in fact, it's almost completely fictional. There was, however, a real-life crime with some superficial similarities. The victim was Helle Crafts, a Connecticut woman who disappeared in 1986. Her husband was ultimately convicted of her murder; investigators determined that he'd
See full article at Moviefone »

Where You've Heard First-Time Oscar Nominee Carter Burwell's Scores Before

  • PEOPLE.com
Where You've Heard First-Time Oscar Nominee Carter Burwell's Scores Before
Carter Burwell is up for his first Academy Award this year, for Carol. Should the composer pick up an Oscar - and he's up against some stiff competition, from legends like Ennio Morricone and John Williams - it'll be his first in a 25-year-career. Here's a look back at some of the highlights: Burwell's longest collaboration has been with the Coen Brothers, for whom he's scored 15 films. After working on Blood Simple, Miller's Crossing and Barton Fink for the pair, Burwell did some more mainstream fare, including work on Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the 1995 historical epic Rob Roy, which
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

One Thing I Love Today: Was the second season of 'Fargo' the best movie of 2015?

  • Hitfix
One Thing I Love Today: Was the second season of 'Fargo' the best movie of 2015?
One Thing I Love Today is a daily column dedicated to putting a spotlight on some pop culture item worth your attention. After all, there's enough snark out there. Why not start every day with one quick shotgun blast of positivity? Noah Hawley is a True Believer. There is no reason whatsoever that a television show based on Fargo should work, but after finishing season two of the FX series, I am blown away by what he's accomplished and by the sheer force of his love for Joel and Ethan Coen. Homage and inspiration are similar, but not the exact same things. Homage is fine, but I think you can only go so far with it. Inspiration, though, is something else. Real inspiration is a springboard to something new, something that is genuinely yours. One person looks at something and sees and processes it a certain way, and someone else
See full article at Hitfix »

No one can agree on the top 5 greatest Coen Brothers films

  • Hitfix
No one can agree on the top 5 greatest Coen Brothers films
As we began talking about editorial content we could publish to celebrate the release of Hail, Caesar!, the latest film from Joel and Ethan Coen, we realized that none of us had the same top five lists, and that it seems unusual for that to be the case. The Coens have had such a rich and varied career that it is impossible to pin them down to one style or one theme or one type of storytelling. Some people love their comedies. Some people love it when they get dark. Some people love the underdogs, the least-liked of their films. But what's clear is that every film they've made has its fans, and even their worst films are beloved by someone. There are few artists like the Coen Brothers, and we were delighted to get lists from each of our special guest contributors this time. The diversity of the replies
See full article at Hitfix »

Review: 'Fargo' - 'Did You Do This? No, You Did It!': Family feuds

  • Hitfix
Review: 'Fargo' - 'Did You Do This? No, You Did It!': Family feuds
A review of tonight's "Fargo" — which FX just renewed for a third season — coming up just as soon as you see why they called me the Breakfast King of Loyola... "This family? Deserves the ground." -Simone "Did you do this? No, you did it!!" is perhaps the series' most overtly Coen-y episode by far, with nods at various points to "The Big Lebowski" (Hank offers to cut off his toe, Mike Miligan says "Sometimes, there's a man," and we hear a version of "I Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)" twice), "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" ("O Death" plays), "Miller's Crossing" (Bear not only takes Simone out to the barren woods to kill her, but we hear "Danny Boy" as he prepares to do it), and even "Fargo" itself (Hank's wife died in Brainerd). For the most part, I've enjoyed these tips of the trooper's
See full article at Hitfix »

You Can Now Stream All 19 Tracks to Carter Burwell's Beautiful 'Carol' Score

You Can Now Stream All 19 Tracks to Carter Burwell's Beautiful 'Carol' Score
Carter Burwell, a veteran film composer best known for his work alongside the Coen Brothers ("Fargo," "Raising Arizona," "Miller's Crossing," "Barton Fink," "The Big Lebowski," "A Serious Man," "True Grit") is often regarded by music and movie critics alike as film's secret weapon. Carefully weaving yearning, melodrama, angst and desire, Burwell's furtive scores add complex layers to a film, and in the case of "Carol," do much to fill in the constrained silences of the 50s lesbian romance. Watch: "Rooney Mara on Loving Cate Blanchett in 'Carol,' Owning Lisbeth Salander, and More (Exclusive Video)" Amassing a staggering 95 film credits, Burwell now adds Todd Haynes' "Carol" to his roster of accomplishments — pairing his enigmatic brand of minimalist oeuvre with today's most celebrated auteurs. On collaborating with Haynes on "Carol," Burwell told EW he...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

'Fargo': Let's talk about That moment

  • Hitfix
'Fargo': Let's talk about That moment
Warning: Spoilers for Season 2, episode 1 of "Fargo" follow... The second season of FX's anthology crime-drama "Fargo" has premiered with a magnificent first entry that, once again, gracefully dances the line between homage and ingenuity. The series found thematic and tonal links to the Coen brothers' beloved classic in its fist season, and while it continues to honor those roots, becomes even more its own animal in Season 2. Take a look at Alan's review here. There's one particular moment in the debut episode that will likely have viewers talking. The aliens. Or rather, the aliens? I'll confess, it was one of the fist topics I wanted to dive into after seeing the Season 2 premiere. When Kieran Culkin's Rye Gerhardt races out of the massacre at the Waffle Hutt, it appears as though he is witness to a UFO swooping across the lonely winter highway. Of course, he'd just experienced (well
See full article at Hitfix »

Exclusive: 5-Minute Preview Of Carter Burwell's 'Mr. Holmes' Score

  • The Playlist
It's something of a crime that the great Carter Burwell has never won an Oscar, let alone been nominated, because it's hard to imagine some of the movies he's worked on without his musical touch. He's done memorable work for the Coen Brothers in films like "Fargo" and "Miller's Crossing," and his talents run wide, working on everything from Spike Jonze's singular "Where The Wild Things Are" to blockbuster "The Twilight Saga — Breaking Dawn." And his latest effort is another move in an interesting direction with Bill Condon's "Mr. Holmes." Led by Ian McKellen as the famed detective, the story follows the elderly crime solver who embarks on a mission to solve one last case. It's a journey that will see him confront issues of memory, aging, and legacy. And as you'll hear below in this exclusive preview, Burwell brings a sensitive touch with his compositions for the movie.
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: 'Fargo' Season 2 Trailer and Teasers Get Funky, Funny and Violent

  • Indiewire
Watch: 'Fargo' Season 2 Trailer and Teasers Get Funky, Funny and Violent
After an incredible first year that earned the hit FX anthology series "Fargo" some hardware during awards season, expectations for the second installment are high. The new season adds Ted Danson, Kirsten Dunst, Jesse Plemons, Nick Offerman, Jean Smart, Kieran Culkin, and Bruce Campbell (as Ronald Reagan) to the cast.  Read More: How 'BoJack Horseman' Season 2 Tackles the Bill Cosby Controversy A period piece, the next chapter of Noah Hawley's tale travels back to South Dakota and Minnesota for a 1970s-set adventure. The "true crime" storyline investigates a local gang and a major Mob syndicate, and is inspired by three films of the Coen brothers, including "Miller's Crossing," "The Man Who Wasn't There," and, of course, "Fargo." Anything could happen considering the undertones appear to emphasize corporate America, the mob, and politics. Above, we have the first full trailer for Season 2, featuring the full cast and...
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: 'Fargo' Season 2 Trailer and Teasers Get Funky, Funny and Violent

Watch: 'Fargo' Season 2 Trailer and Teasers Get Funky, Funny and Violent
After an incredible first year that earned the hit FX anthology series "Fargo" some hardware during awards season, expectations for the second installment are high. The new season adds Ted Danson, Kirsten Dunst, Jesse Plemons, Nick Offerman, Jean Smart, Kieran Culkin, and Bruce Campbell (as Ronald Reagan) to the cast.  Read More: How 'BoJack Horseman' Season 2 Tackles the Bill Cosby Controversy A period piece, the next chapter of Noah Hawley's tale travels back to South Dakota and Minnesota for a 1970s-set adventure. The "true crime" storyline investigates a local gang and a major Mob syndicate, and is inspired by three films of the Coen brothers, including "Miller's Crossing," "The Man Who Wasn't There," and, of course, "Fargo." Anything could happen considering the undertones appear to emphasize corporate America, the mob, and politics. Above, we have the first full trailer for Season 2, featuring the full cast and...

...
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Secret Cinema's Empire Strikes Back review: An epic galactic voyage

Secret Cinema's Empire Strikes Back review: An epic galactic voyage
Anticipation has been high for Secret Cinema's latest venture, a vast staging of George Lucas's Star Wars in the year that a new film instalment is due to be released.

Following last year's grand scale Back to the Future was going to be tough, but Secret Cinema has become a well-oiled machine and this summer's event is an amazing spectacle. The triumphant return is frequently a punch-the-air thrill ride that doesn't fail to delight.

Taking place in a huge, mystery location in London, the audience was formed by over a thousand people dressed in all manner of Star Wars-themed costumes. Like all Secret Cinema productions, we were all given 'characters' before the show to get some guidance on what to wear, but it doesn't really matter what you come as. We saw one bloke in a giant inflatable Jabba the Hutt outfit, and were pretty sure he wasn't an actor.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Video: A Look at the Visual References in Quentin Tarantino's Movies

When other filmmakers do it it's most often considered a fun homage, but when Quentin Tarantino does it seems to rile people up a bit more to the point they say he's stealing. Personally I found Tarantino's visual references in his films to be endlessly entertaining and eye-opening. I can't tell you how many films I've watched merely because Tarantino references them in his films or mentions them as inspirations for his movies and today we have a new video from Jacob T. Swinney, whose work I've featured several times before, offering a few side-by-side looks at Tarantino's work opposite the films that influenced it. All of Tarantino's films are included from Reservoir Dogs to Django Unchained with films that influenced several shots in each from City on Fire (which people contend Tarantino ripped off entirely for Reservoir Dogs), 8 1/2, Kiss Me Deadly, Lady Snowblood, The Great Silence, Miller's Crossing and many more.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

25 underrated 1990s movie soundtracks

  • Den of Geek
From Muppet Treasure Island to Speed, we take a look at the 90s soundtracks that deserve another listen...

Ah, the 1990s. The decade that brought us The Lion King. Titanic. Quentin Tarantino. That wordless bathroom scene in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet. Angelo Badalamenti's Twin Peaks. Duel of the Fates from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In the Mood for Love.

It was a good 10 years for film music, no doubt.

But scratch the surface of 1991 through 1999 and there are tons of good scores ready to spring a surprise on your ears. Some were attached to sorely underrated movies, others were overshadowed by wildly successful ones, and some have simply been forgotten in the passage of time.

Here, in no particular order, are the top 25 underappreciated film soundtracks from the 1990s.

1. Chaplin - John Barry

Okay, let's start with a big one. Richard Attenborough. Robert Downey Jr. John Barry.
See full article at Den of Geek »
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