The Grifters
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2002

12 items from 2015


Time Machine: Lawrence Is Dazzling Woman in Red

24 April 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Jennifer Lawrence in a long, red dress at the Oscars Jennifer Lawrence at the Academy Awards Stunning in a red dress, Jennifer Lawrence arrives at the 2011 Academy Awards held on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. Lawrence was a first-time Best Actress Oscar nominee for her first major film role: a near-destitute, young Ozark woman looking for her missing drug-dealing father in Winter's Bone, Debra Granik's generally well-received indie drama. Winter's Bone also earned nominations for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (John Hawkes), and Best Adapted Screenplay (Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini; based on the novel by Daniel Woodrell). Jennifer Lawrence's competitors in the Best Actress Oscar race were: Annette Bening for Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids Are All Right. Michelle Williams for Derek Cianfrance's Blue Valentine. Nicole Kidman for John Cameron Mitchell's Rabbit Hole. Natalie Portman, the eventual winner, for Darren Aronofsky's Black Swan. »

- D. Zhea

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘The Frontier’

27 March 2015 11:09 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A woman on the run, a last-chance motel and a lonely stretch of desert highway set the stage for “The Frontier,” an appreciably moody but dramatically stilted crime drama that exudes a certain retro appeal before collapsing into a series of empty neo-noir poses. The debut narrative feature for Israeli-born Oren Shai shows much affection for all things pulp, but a less steady hand with performance and pacing. Some modest festival play should follow the film’s SXSW premiere, before it disappears into that vast American indie abyss known as VOD.

The central figure here is Laine (Jocelin Donahue), a classical femme fatale in the “Psycho”/”Gone Girl” mold, who turns up at the Frontier, a dust-caked motel on the outskirts of Phoenix, with deep bruises on her neck and blood on her hands, looking for a place to clean up and maybe lie low for a while. The TV »

- Scott Foundas

Permalink | Report a problem


Annette Bening on the mysterious charm of Al Pacino in 'Danny Collins'

17 March 2015 11:25 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Annette Bening's varied career of screen roles -- the cunning moll in "The Grifters," the exasperated real estate agent in "American Beauty," the alcoholic lesbian mother in "The Kids are All Right" -- is especially remarkable because almost every character she plays makes us think, "I know that woman." And maybe we don't, but Bening's knack for finding the humanity in a character is a magnetic and constant part of her work.  In "Danny Collins," Bening plays a hotel manager who wearily takes a shine to the titular star, a washed-up rocker played by Al Pacino. We caught up with Bening to discuss the charm of Pacino, her most difficult roles, and how you get into a role you don't find relatable at all.  "Danny Collins" hits theaters March 20.  »

- Louis Virtel

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 First Time Fest – Harvey Weinstein Interview

16 March 2015 5:22 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Johanna Bennett’s and Mandy Ward’s third annual celebration of first time filmmakers concluded on March 9 with a tribute to no one other than Harvey Weinstein. The festival, one that puts forth newly formed filmmakers with the audience they deserve, makes sure that all aspects of filmmaking are met and that the aspiring filmmakers know what to do with their next film. Weinstein, of the famed The Weinstein Company, along with his brother Bob, has shown himself over the years to have supported first time filmmakers when no one else would. And his trust in these filmmakers have only proven themselves to be some of today’s best directors, writers, actors, and more.

In many ways, Weinstein’s support of such filmmakers has created them. Quentin Tarantino would not be a household name had Weinstein not decided to produce Reservoir Dogs, the same goes for Steven Soderbergh’s Sex, »

- Catherina Gioino

Permalink | Report a problem


The 9 Best Con Artist Movies to Watch After 'Focus'

1 March 2015 8:15 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

In Focus, Will Smith's first film since 2013, the superstar plays Nicky, a long-time conman who is planning his last big score, but ends up reuniting with a con woman who he trained years before.

The film, which performed mildly at the box office in its debut this weekend, joins the ranks of Hollywood's long love affair with the art of the con.

Video: Will Smith Is A Shirtless Con Man in Focus

In celebration of this newest entry in the grifter genre, here are nine of the best conman movies ever made.

(Note: This list doesn't include movies about heists that happen to involve conmen -- i.e. Ocean's Eleven or The Heist -- just films that celebrate the age of tradition of swindling.)

9. Matchstick Men (2003): Nicholas Cage and Sam Rockwell play con artists who are planning one of the biggest scams of their careers. Things get complicated when Cage's teenage daughter shows up and »

Permalink | Report a problem


Second Opinion – Focus (2015)

28 February 2015 7:09 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Focus, 2015.

Written and Directed by Glenn Ficarra and John Requa.

Starring Will Smith, Margot Robbie, Rodrigo Santoro, Gerald McRaney, Bd Wong, Robert Taylor, Dominic Fumusa, Brennan Brown and Griff Furst.

Synopsis:

In the midst of veteran con man Nicky’s latest scheme, a woman from his past – now an accomplished femme fatale – shows up and throws his plans for a loop.

The fundamental problem with films like Focus lays in how many similar films like Focus you may have seen. You know exactly what you’re in for (namely, a con) but the fun is always in how the con is pulled off and how the film can gain the confidence of the audience only to trick us at the end. Unfortunately, even if you’ve seen just one similar film chances are it’s far better than this.

When I think of all the best con artist movies I »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Day I'm Hustling: Film’s 10 most memorable con artists

25 February 2015 2:17 PM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Big Willy’s latest big screen outing makes its way to the multiplex this month. In Focus, Smith plays the consummate con man, a smooth operator who liberates people of their wealth with the help of a Margot Robbie-shaped femme fatale.

The duo of tricksters aren’t the first con artists to grace the silver screen however. So from pool sharks and grifters to tricksters, card cheats and American hustlers; here’s our rundown of the most memorable con artists in movie history.

 

Fast Eddie Felson – The Hustler (1961)

One of the finest fraudster films to ever grace the multiplex; The Hustler stars Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson, a pool shark intent on toppling legendary cue-man Minnesota Fats (Jackie Gleason). With its smoky sets, stunning black and white cinematography and superb performances from Newman and Gleason; the film is just as good today as it was on its release more than 50 years ago. »

- Daniel Bettridge

Permalink | Report a problem


The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer Discuss ‘The Killing’

7 February 2015 9:21 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their second piece, they will discuss Stanley Kubrick’s film The Killing (1956).

Drew’s Take

Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing (1956) is not my favorite work by the visionary director. In fact, the film probably wouldn’t even make it onto a list of my top five Kubrick films. Yet, with a career that included such amazing films as Paths of Glory (1957),Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964),2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Barry Lyndon (1975), and The Shining (1980), that’s not an indication that The Killing is a film of poor quality but an indication that Kubrick’s body of work comes the closest to cinematic perfection than any director I can think of. Thus, while The Killing »

- Landon Palmer

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: John Cusack talks ‘Maps to the Stars’

2 February 2015 1:01 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

He’s been a Hollywood star since his teens, when he starred in Class, Sixteen Candles and The Sure Thing, but thankfully John Cusack was never like the characters in David Cronenberg’s Maps To The Stars. A brutal satire about the players, wannabes and has-beens of Hollywood, Cusack plays Stafford Weiss, a self-help guru who peddles his therapies to the weak-minded. Father to the foul Benjie (Evan Bird), a rehab-hopping teen star of the ‘Bad Babysitter’ franchise, Stafford is just one of the soulless ghouls that haunts the Hollywood Hills in what is the Canadian Cronenberg’s first real foray into Tinseltown terrain.

For Cusack, it represents yet another impressive notch in a career that’s seen him work with Stephen Frears (The Grifters, High Fidelity), Woody Allen (Shadows and Fog, Bullets Over Broadway), Spike Jonze (Being John Malkovich), Terence Malick (The Thin Red Line) and Clint Eastwood (Midnight In The Garden of Good and Evil »

- Phil Wheat

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Feature: The Top 10 Celebrity Photos of 2014, By Joe Arce

20 January 2015 1:41 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – In a year where shoots with perpetual photo fashionistas like Cindy Crawford and Sarah Jessica Parker still failed to crack the Top Ten list of biggest celebrity photo-ops, you know 2014 was a very good year for HollywoodChicago.com and myself, Joe Arce, as Senior Staff Photographer.

Narrowing down the 182 celebrity subjects that posed for my lens last year to a mere ten favorite portraits is not an easy task. Nonetheless, here are my Top Ten picks for biggest celebrity shoots of 2014. I based this on a combination of star power wattage of the subjects, the artistic results and the degree of difficulty in landing the quarry – for those iPhone carrying budding celebrity stalkers who may wish to play along at home.

10. Anjelica Huston

Backstage at the Chicago Humanities Festival, November 14th, 2014

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Not only an Oscar winner, but the daughter »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Jeremy Piven: 'You can get caught up in getting the world to love you'

10 January 2015 2:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

After decades playing the sidekick he got his break in Entourage and then landed the lead in ITV’s Mr Selfridge. Three series on, he’d be riding high – if only he wasn’t so misunderstood

For most of the four decades of his career as an actor, Jeremy Piven played That Guy. As in, “Oh look, it’s That Guy who played the cousin with anger issues on the 1990s sitcom Ellen!” Or, “Oh look! It’s That Guy who played the awful check-out clerk in the film Singles!” Or, most of all, “Oh look, it’s That Guy who always plays John Cusack’s obnoxious friend” (Piven has appeared alongside his childhood friend Cusack in Say Anything, The Grifters and Grosse Pointe Blank).

It’s not easy to be That Guy, to stand out when relegated to a bit part and surrounded by other, starrier players, as Piven seemed doomed to be. »

- Hadley Freeman

Permalink | Report a problem


31 Great '90s Movies on Netflix Streaming

6 January 2015 6:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

You've probably seen all the '90s movies, like "Pulp Fiction," "Clueless" and "Wayne's World" that Netflix has to offer, but there are also plenty of lesser-known gems available to stream. Sit down and enjoy these indies, first films by famous directors and some other great '90s movies you might have missed.

1. "Big Night" (1996) R

A great movie (co-directed by stars Stanley Tucci and Campbell Scott) about two Italian brothers in 1950s running an unsuccessful restaurant who go all out when a celebrity's visit promises to save their business.

2. "Boys Don't Cry" (1999) R

Hilary Swank won her first Best Actress Oscar for her searing portrayal of a woman who lives life as a man, until her secret is found out by her redneck friends.

3. "Clueless" (1995) PG-13

How many times have you seen Alicia Silverstone make over her friends and try to play matchmaker? Not enough!

4. "Croupier" (1998) Nr

The movie »

- Sharon Knolle

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2002

12 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners