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The Freshman (1990) Poster

(1990)

Trivia

One day after filming, Marlon Brando left in the trunk of his car to avoid photographers.
Matthew Broderick had no idea that Marlon Brando was going to use the walnuts as a prop in the scene where they discuss his job. While waiting for the scene to be shot, Brando cracked the walnuts just enough so they would be easy to break, and then used them in the scene to help generate a more genuine response from Broderick.
According to director Andrew Bergman on the Turner Classic Movies documentary on Marlon Brando, he was having a problem shooting a scene with Brando and as a nervous habit, he began chewing Bazooka bubblegum. Brando asked him for a piece to which Bergman replied, "I'll tell you what, you do this scene in one take and I'll give you a piece." They shot the scene in one take and Brando immediately went behind the camera with his hand out. Good to his word, Bergman gave Brando a piece of Bazooka bubblegum.
During post-production, Marlon Brando publicly condemned this film and claimed it would be the biggest turkey of all time. This was because Brando asked for an additional $1 million when the shoot was extended an extra week. When the producers refused, he threatened to badmouth the film in the press. They still refused and he followed through with his threat. The following day, the producers paid him the money and he publicly praised the film.
Writer/director Andrew Bergman was intent on persuading the increasingly reclusive actor Marlon Brando to play the role of Mafia chieftain Carmine Sabatini. A few weeks after sending Brando the script, the actor phoned Bergman and invited the director to his home to discuss the movie. Bergman arrived at Brando's Mulholland Drive home and began two days of intensive, non-stop conversations. The director and the actor discussed eastern religion, the economy, politics, philosophy, insects, geology, history, favorite foods, meditation--everything but the movie, the screenplay, or the role of Carmine Sabatini. Finally, after two days of discussions, during a lull in the conversation, Brando said, "I don't think I can play this part without referencing some aspect of the Don," referring to his iconic role in The Godfather (1972). Bergman, drawing on his background as a comedy writer, thought for a moment. Then he brightened. "I've got it!" said Bergman. "We'll make Carmine Sabatini the guy 'The Godfather' is based on!" The actor thought Bergman's idea over. "I can live with that," Brando said after a few seconds. "Let's do the picture."
This film was released the same year as The Godfather: Part III (1990), the last film from that trilogy.
In this film, Marlon Brando played a character who was supposedly modeled after Don Corleone from The Godfather (1972) after. Bruno Kirby (who plays Brando's nephew) played the young Clemenza in The Godfather: Part II (1974).
According to Penelope Ann Miller on the Turner Classic Movies documentary based on Marlon Brando, Marlon Brando wore an ear-piece so an assistant off stage could feed him his lines. During a scene together, Miller recalled forgetting her lines, to which Brando asked his assistant over a hidden microphone for the line and gave them to Miller. She also recalled Brando telling his assistant at one point, "No, no, no. That's the wrong scene."
In addition to the numerous "Godfather" jokes, the film also makes a reference to another Marlon Brando film. At one point, Sabatini mistakenly refers to Clark as "Kent." In the movie Superman (1978), Brando played Clark Kent's father, Jor-El. The Gourmet Club Maitre D' is played by Gianni Russo. Russo portrayed Michael Corleone's treacherous brother-in-law, Carlo Rizzi, in The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather Part II (1974).
Gianni Russo, who plays the Maitre D' at The Gourmet Club, played Carlo in The Godfather (1972). In that film, Marlon Brando said of Carlo, "Give him a living, but never discuss the family business with him." As Brando is leaving the Gourmet Club, the Maitre D' says, "Good night, boss."
Frank Whaley's character likens the character "Big Leo" to a rather rotund former wrestler named William 'Haystacks' Calhoun. Whaley has no idea who Haystacks was, but writer/director Andrew Bergman (a wrestling fan in his youth) made up the line on the spot for Whaley.
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According to Marlon Brando's autobiography, he, Matthew Broderick, Bruno Kirby and Rocco Musacchia went out to eat in New York and came across real-life mafia boss John Gotti. Brando reportedly attempted to break the ice with a magic trick, but an awkward joke at Gotti's expense forced Brando and company to leave.
Victor Ray gives Clark Kellogg an Italian passport with the name "Rodolfo Lassparri," the name of a character from A Night at the Opera (1935).
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A running gag in the film is that nearly every other character says that Clark is from any state except Vermont, which is his real home state.
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This was the first film to use N.W.A.'s "Straight Outta Compton." The clean version was used to keep the PG rating.
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Robert Downey Jr. was offered the role of Clark Kellogg but passed.
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Robin Wright was considered for the role of Tina Sabatini.
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The name of Dustin Hoffman's character in Family Business (1989), which co-starred actor Matthew Broderick, was "Vito," which was arguably a nod to crime boss Don Vito Corleone, from The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather: Part II (1974). This was perhaps a deliberate piece of irony, as the middle male of the three McMullen family members, Vito was the only one of the three who was not criminally-minded. Actor Matthew Broderick co-starred the following year with Marlon Brando, who had played Vito Corleone in The Godfather (1972), in The Freshman (1990), where Brando engaged in a self-parody of his Vito Corleone characterization, which had won him an Academy Award for Best Actor for The Godfather (1972).
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Bert Parks, who was always identified with the Miss America theme, sung a mean version of Bob Dylan's "Maggie's Farm" and The Champs' classic "Tequila."
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The quote should actually say, "Will the owner of the reptile please report to the information desk?"
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