6.6/10
64,488
152 user 50 critic

Flatliners (1990)

Four Medical students experiment on "near death" experiences that involve past tragedies until the dark consequences begin to jeopardize their lives.

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3,586 ( 1,971)

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Joshua Rudoy ...
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Aeryk Egan ...
Kesha Reed ...
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John Duda ...
Young David (as John Joseph Duda)
Megan Stewart ...
Playground Kid
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Playground Kid
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Storyline

Medical students begin to explore the realm of near death experiences, hoping for insights. Each has their heart stopped and is revived. They begin having flashes of walking nightmares from their childhood, reflecting sins they committed or had committed against them. The experiences continue to intensify, and they begin to be physically beaten by their visions as they try and go deeper into the death experience to find a cure. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Some lines shouldn't be crossed.


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

10 August 1990 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Línea mortal  »

Box Office

Budget:

$26,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$61,490,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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(70 mm prints)| (digital 35 mm prints)| (analog 35 mm prints)

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The picture was the first film to be produced as part of the three-year exclusive agreement between Michael Douglas and Rick Bieber's Stonebridge Entertainment and Columbia Pictures. The subsequent titles in the three-picture deal were Radio Flyer (1992) and Made in America (1993), with Douglas acting as Executive Producer and Producer respectively. See more »

Goofs

In the bathroom scene with Rachel and her father, the walls can be seen sliding back in order to make the set bigger for the 360 degree camera sweep. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Nelson Wright: Today is a good day to die.
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Connections

Referenced in Diagnosis Murder: Playing God (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

PARTY TOWN
Written and Performed by David A. Stewart (as Dave Stewart)
Courtesy of BMG Records (UK) Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
I have this flashback of Wednesday Addams about to electrocute Pugsly while playing a game called "Is there a God?"
18 May 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Every time I think about this film, I have this flashback of Wednesday Addams about to electrocute Pugsly while playing a game called "Is there a God?" The premise of the film is that one could view the afterlife and come back with the ability to report on their findings. The idea that a medical school would admit or retain anyone who had these tendencies, let alone allow a sizable amount of expensive equipment to go unaccounted for, is ridiculous. Given that, I have to say the film has merit, but it is certainly not the merit of a sound plot.

The acting, however, is superb, and every cast member should be applauded for their ability to rise to the occasion in this somewhat palatable "horror" film.

Kiefer's ability to maintain his character's persona is exceptional, breaking at just the right moment in the film.

Julia Roberts certainly gives us a performance rivaling her work in previous films, as well as adding an interesting perspective to the idea of guilt and redemption.

Kevin Bacon is the glue than binds this band together, with his ability to maintain the focus of the five on the problems they are facing.

Oliver Platt provides an interesting sort of comic relief, and William Baldwin brings his boyish demeanor into play with his particular sin, although you have to wonder how that character ever got into medical school.

The sets really give us the "horror" feeling, and you have to give Joel Schumacher his props for his camera angles and framing of the these spooky rooms and buildings.

Rated R for violence, sexual references and scenes, and language, definitely not one for the younger set. Wouldn't want to give anyone ideas. Not particularly collectible.


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