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Flashback Weekend 2017: Heather Langenkamp, Amanda Wyss, and Ronee Blakley Reflect on A Nightmare On Elm Street [Part 1]

From August 4th through August 6th, Flashback Weekend Chicago Horror Con took over the Windy City, and Daily Dead was on hand for all the horror-fied festivities. Throughout all three days, this writer served as one of Flashback’s co-hosts, and brought back some highlights from several of the panels held over the course of the convention.

Below is the first part of our excerpts from the panel featuring the women of A Nightmare on Elm Street, Heather Langenkamp, Amanda Wyss, and Ronee Blakley. The trio discussed their careers at the point of being involved with the first film in the Nightmare franchise, how the project came about, and their experiences seeing Wes Craven’s landmark film for the very first time.

Be sure to check back here on Daily Dead for more from the women of A Nightmare on Elm Street.

I would love to start off by hearing
See full article at DailyDead »

Cate Blanchett on Crafting a Career, One Choice at a Time: Awards Season Flashback

Cate Blanchett on Crafting a Career, One Choice at a Time: Awards Season Flashback
[Editor’s Note: This post is presented in partnership with Spectrum. Catch up on this year’s Awards Season contenders and past winners On Demand. Today’s flashback winner is “Lord of the Rings: Return of the King.”]

In a career that already seen five Oscar nominations and one win for a body of work that includes remarkable performances as Queen Elizabeth, Bob Dylan and Katherine Hepburn, no less, Cate Blanchett somehow topped herself this year.

As the title character in Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine,” Blanchett plays a woman whose wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) has lost all their money, forcing her to abandon their upper class Manhattan life to live with her working class sister (Sally Hawkins) in San Francisco. Even at this point, Jasmine is somewhere past the verge of a nervous breakdown, and Blanchett manages her character’s subsequent further spiraling with a tour-de-force authenticity that blew away audiences and critics alike.

Leading into the Oscars, Blanchett has already won a slew of kudos for “Blue Jasmine,” including a Golden Globe, honors from the New York and Los Angeles critics groups and nominations from SAG,
See full article at Indiewire »

TV Review/Recap: Dead Of Summer S1E2: “Barney Rubble Eyes”

There’s something freeing in knowing that you won’t have to feel conflicted about reviewing something, in this case Dead of Summer. Sure, I’ll probably find a few enjoyable morsels here and there about this show but overall, these recaps are just going to be one big roast. Episode 2 recap begins below, and it’s a doozy. You can watch along on Hulu or on the official Freeform website, if you’re feeling masochistic.

First, let me just say that this episode title is the kind of pseudo-Stephen King nonsense I was hoping this series wouldn’t devolve into. The unending parade of pop culture references of the first episode should’ve raised red flags all over the place and naming the first episode after a GnR track was precocious enough but This is out of hand.

Anyway, the episode starts with a flashback, as usual, dating
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

TV Review/Recap: Dead Of Summer S1E1: “Patience”

Apparently, while I wasn’t looking, ABC Family and the “executive producers” of Once Upon A Time decided to launch a summer camp-themed horror TV series this year, called Dead of Summer. The series premiered last night and the first episode is available on Hulu or you can watch it at their official site, which you’ll notice that they’ve got next week’s episode already available? But regardless, instead of watching those episodes, you can read my Angry Recap, because ABC Family has absolutely no place making this show.

Intro: Tony Todd playing a creepy melody the piano. I mean, if you’ve got Tony Todd to be in your family-oriented horror TV show, why use any restraint? Also, props to his character for dragging a piano all the way out to his secluded cabin in the woods.

Angry dudes with torches and Winchester rifles! They’re after Tony Todd but,
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Better Call Saul Season 2 Review

Two episodes were provided for review prior to broadcast

Returning next Monday, Season 2 of AMC’s Better Call Saul finds the series marking time, as only it can. Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould’s delightfully droll follow-up/prequel to Breaking Bad does a lot of things the acclaimed nail-biter couldn’t. Better Call Saul relaxes and breathes. It basks in the freedom of being far removed from Breaking Bad chronologically, while still being to able synthesize much of that show’s cast, geography, and tragicomic spirit into something markedly different. Both shows are races against a ticking clock, but Better Call Saul moves to the steady, controlled rhythm of the big hand.

Flashback seven years to 2009: AMC’s scrappy crime farce starring the dad from Malcolm in the Middle has survived the writer’s strike, and opened its second season with a tantalizing promise of fire and mayhem to come.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Help Fund D.A. Pennebaker's Film About Animal Abuse

Help Fund D.A. Pennebaker's Film About Animal Abuse
D. A. Pennebaker — the filmmaker behind the famed 1967 Bob Dylan documentary, Don't Look Back — and his longtime partner Chris Hegedus have started a Kickstarter to fund their latest project, Unlocking the Cage, which chronicles the work of animal rights lawyer Steve Wise. As Pennebaker explains, Wise and his organization, the Nonhuman Rights Project, have been working to grant animals personhood, believing they will only get the protection they deserve if we no longer see them as things.

'Rolling Stone' Readers Pick the 10 Best Rock Documentaries

Pennebaker and Hegedus have raised over $55,000 for their film,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Speed' Fan Attempts to Collect Every VHS Copy (Video)

'Speed' Fan Attempts to Collect Every VHS Copy (Video)
The quest of Speed is far from over. The 1994 film stars Keanu Reeves as a young cop who, with the help of Sandra Bullock and Jeff Daniels, must prevent a bomb attached by Dennis Hopper to a city bus from exploding. An Idaho fan named Ryan Beitz is attempting to collect every VHS copy of the feature, with the hopes of decorating his 15-passenger van like the vehicle in the movie. Photos: Hollywood Flashback: When Sandra Bullock Became a Star and Other Tales From 1994 Beitz's goal sprouted in 2006 while he was looking for affordable Christmas presents in

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Music in Film: Inside Llewyn Davis and 12 Years a Slave

Feature Ivan Radford 23 Jan 2014 - 06:21

Ivan's latest column explores what music can tell us about a character through two new UK soundtrack releases

Music is a powerful thing. It can be used to express authority or portray identity. The very act of playing music defines us, as both performers or listeners. That relationship we have with it makes for two extremely powerful soundtracks currently accompanying movies in UK cinemas: Inside Llewyn Davis and 12 Years a Slave.

Inside Llewyn Davis

"Play me something from Inside Llewyn Davis," manager Bud Grossman (F. Murray Abraham) challenges Oscar Isaac's lead in the middle of the Coen brothers' film. Llewyn responds with The Death of Queen Jane, an old ballad from the 1500s that recounts the tale of King Henry losing his wife, Jane Seymour, to gain a son. It's not a happy song.

It's also a clear statement from Llewyn: he's not afraid of sadness.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Photographer Norman Seeff Unveils Images of Diane Keaton, Cher & More for the First Time at Public Auction

Photographer Norman Seeff Unveils Images of Diane Keaton, Cher & More for the First Time at Public Auction
Two years before Diane Keaton charmed audiences in Annie Hall, she posed for photographer Norman Seeff. But Seeff says Keaton's off-camera persona matched up with what she portrayed on-screen. "You know when you see Diane in a movie and there’s this kind of personality, this bright-eyed innocence? When I worked with her, there was this same feeling, but underneath the innocence was such a smart woman. She had the wonderful ability to just be herself. She flowed from one thing to the other, so I just kept pace with her. It was a jewel of a session," he told
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The 15 Greatest Movie Trip Scenes Ever

There's always been a lot of tripping in movies, and man, is it hilarious. People trip all the time. Why, just the other day, I had dropped my backpack on the floor of my apartment right when I walked in, and as I circled back around really quickly I ended up stepping right into ...

Oh. Ohhh. That type of tripping. The one with hallucinogenic drugs. Okay, got it. Yeah, that type of tripping is funny, too. And hey, that's in a bunch of movies as well! Like, say, this week's "This is the End." Or so we hear.

We've counted down for you the Top 15 "tripping" scenes in movies, ranked in order of ... trippiest? We guess?

15. 'Batman Begins' (2005)

The tripping scenes in "Batman Begins" are underrated to the degree that a) they're not done for fun — quite the opposite, in fact — and b) they're kind of an afterthought
See full article at NextMovie »

Catch-up TV Guide: From early Dinklage to Depeche Mode

Depeche Mode 101

Da Pennebaker made his name with the vérité Bob Dylan documentary Don't Look Back; here he follows Depeche Mode in a similar style as they play the 101st gig of their 1989 Music For The Masses tour. Expect topless pinball, leather shorts, screaming teens and lots of onstage stadium footage. It's a good companion piece to the final instalment of How The Brits Rocked America: Go West, still available until Monday.

BBC iPlayer

Pitchfork.TV

Pitchfork extends its empire of indie, hip-hop and precisely rated reviews with a video wing, now available on a dedicated YouTube channel, which also makes it easy for anyone with a smart TV to watch. Clips include interviews with A$AP Rocky, No Age at Atp, Kurt Vile live, and Ariel Pink doing his best to blow the whole "streaming in 1080p HD" vibe with a very lo-fi rendition of Flashback for Pitchfork's "analogue Add" strand.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Many Faces of Dennis Hopper

Pop quiz, hot shot. Iconic American character actor, Dennis Hopper, has just died and left a void in the ephemeral ether of Hollywood, what do you do? What do you do? I know the one thing I will not do is mourn the passing of a legend. Hopper always had a weird sense of humor, and what better way to remember his life and characters then to take a look at some of the craziest bastards (and some of the not-so-memorable characters) that he portrayed.

“What the hell is wrong with freedom? That's what it's all about,” said by Hopper in Easy Rider.

Howard Payne in Speed (1994): Thank God, Hopper was there to offset Keanu’s attempt at acting in this high-paced bus adventure. Yeah, I know. High-paced and bus don’t really go hand in hand, but whatever. Hopper portrayed a crazy son-of-a-bitch that had been wronged by society.
See full article at MoviesOnline »

James Mourns The Passing Of Dennis Hopper With A Top Ten List

Dennis Hopper. One of the greats in cinema history. A consistent rebel in Hollywood, he pushed envelopes as often as he ripped them up and pissed on the scraps. And even when you could tell he was doing a film just for a paycheck, he did the most with that role and made us as film fans all the happier. I’m looking at you, “Waterworld”. So here at the Criterion Cast, I’ve decided to do a top 10 of my favorite Dennis Hopper roles in film. It also doesn’t hurt that he is in the Criterion Collection, in the TV series “Fishing With John”. Check it out if you haven’t already.

10. “Speed” (1994) – As villainous bomb expert Howard Payne, he more or less steals the movie from Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock. But that’s like stealing candy from two rocks. I enjoy this film though, considering the
See full article at CriterionCast »

Dennis Hopper obituary

Hell-raising actor and director who created memorable roles in films from Easy Rider to Blue Velvet

Dennis Hopper, who has died of cancer aged 74, was one of Hollywood's great modern outlaws. His persona, on and off the screen, signified the lost idealism of the 1960s. There were stages in Hopper's career when he was deemed unemployable because of his reputation as a hell-raiser and his substance abuse. However, he made spectacular comebacks and managed to kick his dependence on alcohol and cocaine.

Born in Dodge City, Kansas, Hopper, whose father was a post-office manager and mother a lifeguard instructor, expressed an interest in painting and acting at a young age. While still in his teens, he appeared in repertory at Pasadena Playhouse, California, and studied acting with Dorothy McGuire and John Swope at the Old Globe theatre, San Diego.

The year of his 19th birthday, 1955, was extraordinary. Not only did
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clip joint: Simplicity

This week on Clip joint, nilpferd is not perfumed, not coloured, just kind, as he talks us through some of the best examples of simplicity in the cinema

Every now and then we need to get back to the basics. Whether overwhelmed by the rapid-edit audiovisual overload of 21st century cinema, or just in need of an escape from the hectic pace of everyday life, we can all use a dose of minimalism from time to time.

The reduction of any art form to an essential core has long been equated with perfection, and the movies are no exception. But inevitably, trying to definite "simplicity" in film is anything but straightforward, encompassing anything from Len Lye's direct films to Derek Jarman's Blue, the low-budget slacker charm of Clerks versus the philosophical musings of Bruce Lee.

And there's always the risk of refining things so much that there's nothing left.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Playhouse--May 2010

DVD Playhouse—May 2010

By

Allen Gardner

Avatar (20th Century Fox) James Cameron beat his own title as box office champ, set with Titanic over a decade ago, with this eye-popping sci-fi epic about a paraplegic Marine name Sully (Sam Worthington), who takes the form of an “avatar,” or virtual being, to go undercover on the planet Pandora, attempting to infiltrate the native Na’vi to gather intelligence that will aid a joint corporate and military operation to rape the planet of its natural resources, destroying its indigenous population in the process. When Sully suddenly “goes native,” he locks horns with the company CEO (Giovanni Ribisi) and his gung-ho commanding officer (Stephen Lang, in a wonderful, scenery-chewing turn from a long-underrated actor). Thought of by many scholars and film buffs as a “game-changer” as much as the first Star Wars film was—and they may be right. While Cameron’s politically-correct
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

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