Dances with Wolves
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 41 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


'Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2' Blu-ray Preview | Exclusive

1 July 2015 3:43 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Director Andy Fickman takes fans behind-the-scenes and introduces us to some of the hard-working crew members in our exclusive preview for Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2, which is currently available on Digital HD before arriving on Blu-ray and DVD July 14. Andy Fickman introduces us to one of Kevin James' stunt doubles, the line producer Marty P. Ewing and director of photography Dean Semler, who won an Oscar 25 years ago for Dances with Wolves. This preview is part of the "How to Make a Movie" featurette, where the filmmaker explores every different department on the comedy sequel.

Kevin James is back in action as Paul Blart in the outrageous comedy sequel Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2. After six years of keeping our malls safe, Paul Blart has earned a well-deserved vacation and heads to Las Vegas with his teenage daughter for a security guard expo. But safety never takes a »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


36 major blockbusters and why they never got made

11 June 2015 6:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We look at the films that slipped through Hollywood's net, from biblical epics to a time travelling Gladiator sequel...

This article contains a spoiler for Gladiator

If you're one of those frustrated over the quality of many of the blockbusters that make it to the inside of a multiplex, then ponder the following. For each of these were supposed to be major projects, that for one reason or another, stalled on their way to the big screen. Some still may make it. But for many others, the journey is over. Here are the big blockbusters that never were...

1. Airframe

The late Michael Crichton scored another residential on the bestseller list with his impressive thriller, Airframe. It was published in 1996, just after films of Crichton works such as Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure and the immortal Congo had proven to be hits of various sizes.

So: a hit book, another techno thriller, »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


Remembering Betsy Palmer, Anne Meara, B.B. King and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in May

2 June 2015 9:30 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Marcus Belgrave (1936-2015) - Trumpet Player. Legend of the Detroit jazz scene, he can be seen in the documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown. He died on May 24. (Nyt) Michael Blake (1945-2015) - Screenwriter. He won an Oscar for adapting his own novel into the script for Dances With Wolves (see below). He died on May 2. (THR) Wally Cassell (1912-2015) - Actor. He starred in movies of the '40s and '50s, including White Heat and Story of...

Read More

»

- Christopher Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

26 May 2015 2:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Stone (Thrillingly) Assassinates Truth While Investigating Kennedy Assassination

14 May 2015 6:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'JFK' movie with Kevin Costner as Jim Garrison 'JFK' assassination movie: Gripping political drama gives added meaning to 'Rewriting History' If it's an Oliver Stone film, it must be bombastic, sentimental, clunky, and controversial. With the exception of "clunky," JFK is all of the above. It is also riveting, earnest, dishonest, moving, irritating, paranoid, and, more frequently than one might expect, outright brilliant. In sum, Oliver Stone's 1991 political thriller about a determined district attorney's investigation of the assassination of U.S. president John F. Kennedy is a slick piece of propaganda that mostly works both dramatically and cinematically. If only some of the facts hadn't gotten trampled on the way to film illustriousness. With the exception of John Williams' overemphatic score – Oliver Stone films need anything but overemphasis – JFK's technical and artistic details are put in place to extraordinary effect. Joe Hutshing and Pietro Scalia's editing »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


The top 20 underappreciated films of 1987

13 May 2015 8:45 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From anime to pitch-black thrillers, here's our pick of the underappreciated movies of 1987...

Sometimes, the challenge with these lists isn't just what to put in, but what to leave out. We loved Princess Bride, but with a decent showing at the box office and a huge cult following, isn't it a bit too popular to be described as underappreciated? Likewise Joe Dante's Innerspace, a fabulously geeky, comic reworking of the 60s sci-fi flick, Fantastic Voyage.

What we've gone for instead is a mix of genre fare, dramas and animated films that may have garnered a cult following since, but didn't do well either critically or financially at the time of release. Some of the movies on our list just about made their money back, but none made anything close to the sort of returns enjoyed by the likes of 1987's biggest films - Three Men And A Baby, Fatal Attraction »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


Major Crimes Season Three DVD Giveaway

12 May 2015 1:35 PM, PDT | AreYouScreening.com | See recent AreYouScreening news »

The third season release of Major Crimes is hitting May 26th, and I’ve got your opportunity to win one of three copies of the DVD!

The show, a spin-off of The Closer, has been doing well since it premiered, and the third season was the #3 scripted drama on basic cable.

Moreover, despite not kicking off all that well, it’s a show that has grown into itself, and found a more solid base of existence. The quality has grown in many respects, and the cases were far more interesting in the third season.

Mary McDonnell seems more comfortable, due in large part to the writing giving her a broader base of character to work with.

If you aren’t caught up, now is the perfect chance to get ready for the fourth season.

Take a look at more info on the season, and enter to win your copy!

Warner Bros. »

- Marc Eastman

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Academy Award Winner Michael Blake, Writer of Dances With Wolves, Dead at 69

4 May 2015 3:34 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Michael Blake, the Academy Award-winning screenwriter, has passed away at 69-years-old after a long health battle, according to Deadline. Blake catapulted into stardom after adapting the screenplay for Dances With Wolves in 1990—which earned him the Oscar. History has it that Kevin Costner was responsible for convincing Blake to adapt the screenplay from the novel of the same name. The two met while working on Stacey's Knights—which Blake had written as well. Costner famously directed and starred in the hit film, and won for Best Director as well as Best Picture. Shortly thereafter, Costner requested that Blake write two other screenplays for him, The Mick and The »

Permalink | Report a problem


Dances With Wolves screenwriter Michael Blake dies at the age of 69

3 May 2015 4:18 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Hollywood screenwriter and author Michael Blake, most famous for his Oscar-winning movie Dances with Wolves, has died.

Blake's manager and producing partner Daniel Ostroff told The Hollywood Reporter that Blake died peacefully in Tuscon, Arizona on Saturday (May 2). Blake, who was 69, was battling a long-term illness.

In 1988, Blake wrote Dances With Wolves and later adapted it as a film feature in 1990, directed by and starring Kevin Costner.

The movie went on to win seven Oscars including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay for Blake. Costner also won the Academy Award for Best Director.

Prior to Dances With Wolves, Costner and Blake worked on the 1983 drama Stacy's Knights - the duo's first collaboration.

Blake also got behind the camera as a director in 1998's Winding Stair, which he also adapted into a screenplay from Douglas C Jones' novel.

Blake is survived by his wife Marrianne Mortensen Blake and their three children. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Blake, Oscar-Winning Writer of Dances With Wolves, Dies at 69

3 May 2015 7:54 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Michael Blake, who wrote the novel Dances With Wolves and penned its subsequent film treatment, has died at 69, Variety reports.Blake spent his childhood in Texas and Southern California, where he became enamored with the story of the southwest. He studied journalism briefly before switching to film at the University of New Mexico. He then pursued a career in screenwriting. Only one of Blake’s screenplays made it to the big screen in the 1980s, but that film, Stacy’s Knights, starred Kevin Costner, who proved instrumental to Blake’s career. Costner convinced Blake to write the novel Dances With Wolves, which subsequently sold 3.5 million copies and was translated into 15 languages. Costner, of course, directed and starred in the 1990 cinematic adaptation for which Blake won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. The novel and film depict a Union Army Lieutenant in the Civil War-era west who meets a group of »

- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Blake, ‘Dances With Wolves’ Screenwriter, Dies at 69

3 May 2015 12:46 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Michael Blake, who won an Oscar for penning the script of “Dances With Wolves,” has died, his manager and producing partner Daniel Ostroff has confirmed. He was 69.

According to Ostroff, Blake died peacefully in Tucson, Ariz., after battling a long illness.

Blake wrote the novel “Dances With Wolves” in 1988, before it was turned into an Oscar-winning feature. The book would go on to sell more than 3.5 million copies and be translated into 15 different languages.

The film came out in 1990, directed by and starring Kevin Costner, and was both a commercial and critical smash. Along with screenplay, it won six other Oscars, including best picture. The script also won the prize at the WGA Awards and the Golden Globes.

Costner later commissioned Blake to write two other screenplays — “The Mick” and “The One.” Before “Dances With Wolves,” the two worked together on “Stacy’s Knights” in 1983.

Blake most recently wrote a »

- Alex Stedman

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Blake, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter of 'Dances With Wolves,' Dies at 69

2 May 2015 9:59 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Michael Blake, who won an Academy Award for adapting the screenplay for Dances With Wolves from his own novel, has died. He was 69. Blake died peacefully after a lengthy illness on Saturday in Tucson, Ariz., Blake's manager and producing partner Daniel Ostroff told The Hollywood Reporter. In 1988, Blake wrote the novel Dances With Wolves, which has sold more than 3.5 million copies and has been translated into 15 languages. Producer Matt Murphy is currently developing it for the stage. Read more Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 The 1990 film version won seven Oscars, including best picture, and landed Blake

read more

»

- THR Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Winning ‘Dances With Wolves’ Author/Screenwriter Michael Blake Has Died

2 May 2015 9:56 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

After a long illness, Dances With Wolves author and screenwriter Michael Blake died today in Tucson, Arizona where he and his family lived for many years.  He was 69. His passing was confirmed by his manager and producer Daniel Ostroff, who is working on a Dances With Wolves sequel, The Holy Road. Blake’s best known novel sold over 3.5 million copies, and was translated into 15 languages. The 1990 film, which Kevin Costner directed and starred in, won seven Oscars… »

Permalink | Report a problem


Are you ready for Part 2? More Gladiators of the '90s: Then and now

1 May 2015 9:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

We certainly felt the power of 10 former Gladiators yesterday, as we took a look at what some of the stars went on to after the success of ITV's '90s hit.

We were bowled over to discover that Blaze (Eunice Huthart) is a stunt double to A-listers and godmother to Angelina Jolie's daughter Shiloh, and that Rhino (Mark Smith) went on to star in Hollywood films including Ben Affleck's Oscar-winning drama Argo.

But whatever happened to the villainous Wolf or the infamous Shadow, who was dramatically sacked from the series? We haven't found many current pictures of this lot, but here's a little bit about what 9 more of our favourite former Gladiators got up to after their time on the show:

1. Scorpio (Nikki Diamond)

Contenders were subjected to the mighty sting of the speedy Scorpio. Former bodybuilder and model Nikki Diamond was an original Gladiator, but was forced »

Permalink | Report a problem


3D in the 21st Century. Come Into My World: The Dimensions of "Avatar"

1 May 2015 7:09 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

One way of telling the history of photographic arts is to describe a linear progression of more and more realistic picture-making, as if painter's brushes and pencils aimed mainly to approximate the human eye until, finally, photography emerged. (This is the premise André Bazin famously explored in “The Ontology of the Photographic Image.”) Given photography's automatic reproduction, painting could move on to express more boldly, more experimentally, more abstractly. Realism was no longer necessary. Incidentally, a lot of the most visible and most discussed uses of CGI and SFX in contemporary cinema have embodied images, actions, and temporalities that are far from realistic. These digital platforms enable visions of worlds that alter our own sufficiently so as to provide something—escape? Improvement? Color? It doesn't ultimately matter. The point is that the pixel has often been directed towards ends that seem to go against photography (and cinematography's) automatic capture of the world. »

- Zach Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


Vanilla Ice on 'Ridiculous 6': 'This Movie Isn't 'Dances With Wolves''

27 April 2015 7:27 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

While the controversy around Adam Sandler's Ridiculous 6 continues to swell due to its portrayal of Native Americans, an unlikely ally has spoken out in support of Sandler: Vanilla Ice. The Cool as Ice rapper, who starred alongside Sandler in the 2012 comedy That's My Boy and will appear as Mark Twain in Ridiculous 6, defended the comedian against the Native American actors who left the Netflix production because they felt it was perpetuating negative stereotypes.

"It's a comedy," Vanilla Ice told TMZ. "I don't think anybody really had any ill feeling or any intent or anything. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Vanilla Ice Defends Adam Sandler’s ‘Ridiculous Six': It’s Not ‘Dances With Wolves’

26 April 2015 4:18 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

One of the castmembers of Adam Sandler’s already controversial Netflix project, “The Ridiculous Six,” has spoken up in defense of the movie.

After reports surfaced this week that a dozen Native Americans walked off the set of the comedy because of offensive jokes in the script, Vanilla Ice, who plays Mark Twain in the film, defended it to TMZ.

“It’s a comedy,” he said. “I don’t think anybody really had any ill feeling or any intent or anything. This movie isn’t ‘Dances With Wolves.’ It’s a comedy. They’re not there to showcase anything about anybody — they’re just making a funny movie, I think.”

“I don’t have anything to do with it,” he added. “I just play my part.”

Vanilla Ice also said he’s “part Choctaw,” so he sees both sides of the issue. The musician had previously worked with Sandler, appearing »

- Alex Stedman

Permalink | Report a problem


From Actor to "Action!", Exploring the Debuts of 19 Actors-Turned-Directors

21 April 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over the course of film history, we've seen plenty of long-time actors step behind the camera to take up their directorial ambitions. Clint Eastwood did it. Mel Gibson did it. George Clooney did it. What do these three have in commonc Well, for starters, they are all men, so there's that. Further, they are all white, but more on that later. More to the point of the article, these men all eased into their directorial careers by starring in their respective debuts, using their presence on screen to help market their talents off it. And with his feature directorial effort The Water Diviner, which hits limited theaters this week, Russell Crowe is just the most recent addition to a growing list of actors who have decided to try their hand behind the camera. Like Eastwood, Gibson, and Clooney before him, the Best Actor winner stars in his first feature as director, »

- Jordan Benesh

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Rich Graff talks Making of the Mob: NY

12 April 2015 1:51 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Kat Kourbeti chats with Rich Graff about Making of the Mob: NY…

Kat Kourbeti: Congratulations on your new role in ‘Making of the Mob: NY’. What drew you to the part of Lucky Luciano? How did you approach the process of morphing into such a notorious gangster? What was it like on set of this project – any tit bits you can share?

Rich Graff: At the age of 11, I moved to Howard Beach, NY. I didn’t know it at the time, but most of my friend’s fathers were the head of the Gambino crime family. My best friend was Peter Gotti, John Gotti’s youngest son. Others included Angelo Ruggerio’s sons and Jimmie Burke’s son; Jimmie Conway as portrayed in the movie Goodfellas. Without ever having to commit a crime, I know exactly how these people lived, killed, and socialized. As I got older and »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 41 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners