IMDb > Avalon (1990) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
Avalon
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
Avalon More at IMDbPro »

Write review
Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 1 of 5:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [Next]
Index 50 reviews in total 

32 out of 37 people found the following review useful:

Wonderful walk down memory lane

10/10
Author: Tom from United States
12 January 2005

Although this film takes place 15 years before I was born, growing up in an ethnic family in the early 60's had changed very little.

My family is Greek, but this film will appeal to any ethnic group especially first or second generation Americans. Back then we all still gathered at one member's home for holidays and on Sundays. We all dressed up (and still do) for church and holiday gatherings. Watching little Elijah Wood with his bow tie reminded me of myself at that age.

Mr. Levinson through film, and Randy Newman through his haunting musical score did a magnificent job of recreating a world that has all but disappeared. A time when family was the center of our lives, children respected the adults and were expected to behave in a civilized manner, people didn't spend Sundays running all over town to football, soccer games etc, and the elder members of the family were revered instead of ignored or worse, placed in a home.

We, those of us in the post-war generation would to well to look at this film as a guideline for how to bring values back into our lives and realize that we all need to re-think our priorities.

If you want to relive your childhood for 2 1/2 hours laugh one minute and cry the next, I HIGHLY recommend this film

Was the above review useful to you?

16 out of 18 people found the following review useful:

A truly brilliant picture of the American Family

Author: David London (dtlfl@aol.com) from Deerfield Beach, FL
6 July 2001

AVALON which is the third leg of the Baltimore Trilogy was unfortunately overlooked at Oscar time in 1990. It is a truly brilliant film written and directed by Barry Levinson.

It is about the evolution of the storyteller. Sam the head of the family comes to America in 1914 on the Fourth of July. It was a time when family meant something and those that came here first sent money back so that other family members could join them in the land of hope. Sam is the the family storyteller. He tells the family history to the children in hopes that they will always remember where they came from. As the years go by the family moves away from Avalon, the neighborhood that they first came to and the family begins to change. They move apart and splinter and the new technology known as the television becomes the storyteller. Thanksgivings which are the unifying holiday throughout the story begin with the family waiting for all of the brothers to arrive before "they cut the turkey" and proceeds through smaller family groups sitting at TV stands watching television and ends finally when grandson Michael, with his son visits Sam in a nursing home where the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade plays silently on the televison in Sam's room.

As the film concludes Michael, who is the embodiment of Barry Levinson in the tradition of the storyteller shares his grandfather's story with his son.

All of this backed by Randy Newman's haunting score one of the most fitting ever written for a film.

This is a must see.

Was the above review useful to you?

15 out of 17 people found the following review useful:

Less-than-nostalgic slice of Americana

Author: george.schmidt (gpschmidt67@gmail.com) from fairview, nj
27 February 2003

AVALON (1990) **** Armin Mueller-Stahl, Aidan Quinn, Elizabeth Perkins, Kevin Pollak, Joan Plowright, Lou Jacobi, Elijah Wood, Leo Fuchs. Barry Levinson's personal masterpiece, loosely autobiographical, on family values. Absolutely charming and at times poignant account of the Krachinsky clan, spanning four generations of the Baltimore based Jewish immigrants, and the effects of suburbia, television and the decline of the closeness of American families at large. Wonderful ensemble of talent with a steadily paced and absorbing calmness in tone. Stahl gives a sterling endeavor as does young Wood as his wide-eyed grandson. Loving valentine for all families perfectly realized. Great production design and cinematography.

Was the above review useful to you?

16 out of 22 people found the following review useful:

A stirring tribute

Author: Petunia-2
27 September 1999

It is heart-warming to read comments from those of you who do not even live in Baltimore and enjoyed the movie as much as we Baltimoreans did. What a stirring tribute to the city and to our immigrant grandparents.

My ancestors came from County Cork to Baltimore in the late 1800's. We too, grew up in rowhouses (retitled "townhomes" by realtors in the 1980's) nearby our cousins. Many scenes brought back wonderful memories: the kids playing in the "back alley," the marble steps of the rowhouses which my mother used to lovingly scrub, the "bee" incident, trips to the lake, Thanksgiving dinner with extended family members and tables to seat all the kids extending into the next room, etc., etc.

This could have been just another sappy movie but the actors were so immersed in their characters, I was swept away. Apparently, so were you.

Was the above review useful to you?

14 out of 19 people found the following review useful:

The best family film of the '90's, bar none!

Author: BobLib from Cherry Hill, New Jersey
7 October 1999

If you want a film that celebrates a way of life that's almost gone, that's well-acted in every department, and that gives you a major case of the warm fuzzies in a way the movies seem to have forgotten how to, Barry Levinson's "Avalon" is definitely it.

First, let's examine the cast: Armin Mueller-Stahl, Aidan Quinn, Elizabeth Perkins, Elijah Wood (some ten years pre-"LOTR"), Joan Plowright and Lou Jacobi ("Time to make the donuts!") all give fine, understated performances. Mueller-Stahl, in particular, is the sort of gentle, old-world grandfather anyone might have wished for.

But, as I said earlier, what this film is mainly about is a loving salute to a way of life that's almost gone. As a second generation American growing up in New York, what strikes me about "Avalon" is how real it all is, especially if you grew up in this era, as I did. Young Michael Kaye might have been myself in many ways. And a recent family reunion brought this feeling all back again.

A Wonderful, warm movie. See it!

Was the above review useful to you?

6 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Cast Out From Avalon: The Decline

8/10
Author: ArchAngel Michael from Sword Of The Protector
14 November 2015

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Spoilers Ahead:

Want to understand the quintessence of this little forgotten gem? Pair the first scene with the last scene: that is the movie, my friends. We first see Sam coming to America amidst the fireworks of the 4th of July celebration, he is ecstatic and entranced. Now, at the end, Michael has brought his son to see Sam, lost and forgotten, in some nondescript rest home. On the television is blaring the mindless Thanksgiving Day parade. See the contrast? The movie is quite linear it moves from the tradition based immigrant American table recounting the stories and legends of the extended family. The children, notice, are relegated to their own table where later they ask Jule's wife questions about the family. Yes, critics, television is attacked but the thrust of the narrative is the decline of the family and its transformation from tradition to acquisition. The brothers' store story blends seamlessly with the television as an agent of the breakdown of the extended family. I love the scene where they all crowd with their TV trays in front of the television notice Levinson's shot of the empty family table after we see them all staring, catatonically, like zombies, at the tube. This is why the funny yet very important 'cutting of the turkey' scene is the key to understanding what Levinson is up to here.

As the brothers gain economic power they begin to argue with their elders at the family business conclaves. Sam defends them and their usurpation, based on their growing wealth, builds to Sam telling his wife to go ahead and cut the turkey, 'the children are hungry.' If you focus only upon the television's destructive impact on the social familial order and its rupturing of the extended family table, you will wonder why on earth we are spending so much time with the brothers and their store? The core of this treasure is to see how the growing wealth leads to the schism in the family between Gabriel and Sam. We hear this from Gabriel; they brought Sam here, I am the elder brother. The brothers success and Sam's defensiveness about their beginning to insert themselves in the order, above their station in the familial hierarchy, culminates in the funniest but deepest part of the film: The cutting of the turkey without Gabriel. The symbolism is that more than the turkey is being cut. It leads to a separation that never is repaired the length of the movie. The movie has been attacked by people who focus upon the television which is but one part of the total narrative. The movie is best grasped but contrasting the first scene of Sam with the last one.

Yes, Levinson does point out how the social life of picnics, parks and outdoor activities disappears and is replaced by the program schedule on the boob tube. It goes much deeper than that, notice the place of children at the beginning versus the brothers taking over the meetings where, as younger people, the norm was to be seen and not heard. It is not hard to decipher Levinson's view of the nuclear family versus the extended family. Notice the contrast between the elderly relatives brought over and supported versus Sam dumped in a care home at the end. As we hear him repeat the epiphany of coming to America to Michael's son the deep, powerful pathos of this incredibly sad film washes over us. It is not meant as a compliment to America. Levinson is using it to close the movie quite darkly: look how he wound up? The theme of this misunderstood treasure is the decline of traditional America and its transformation into the obsession with wealth and standard of living. The television is but one part of the transformation. It is excellently written and acted with great dialog and humor.

I loved this from when I first saw it twenty-five years ago. Like many of you, I could never quite articulate why I adored it. It is very sad and tragic. Sam's kindness and protection of Michael is rewarded in the end for he is the only one who still remembers and loves him. With the exception of Diner, I really enjoy Barry Levinson. This is one of his lesser known movies; it is a quiet, pensive little one of a kind gem. I Still Love This Movie.

Was the above review useful to you?

7 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

Excellent ensemble cast and worthy script make this a must-see

9/10
Author: Robert Reynolds (minniemato@hotmail.com) from Tucson AZ
26 December 2000

This film has much to recommend it-set design, cinematography and so on- but what makes it truly shine is a marvelous script and an ensemble cast that almost uniformly turn in excellent work. The characters live and breathe and fair jump off the screen at the audience. You come to care about them, even the ones you don't like. It's an entrancing, riveting journey through the 20th century as it was lived by one family. Don't miss this one. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll even be nice to that cousin you can't stand or your daughter's current boyfriend,who you swear is from Pluto! Most exceedingly highly recommended!!!

Was the above review useful to you?

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Thank you Barry Levinson!!!!!

Author: ddicarlo-2 from Fairfax, Virginia
4 August 2000

Avalon is really a beautifully written story and Levinson's cast is excellent. This really is one of the better stories of the American experience. Actually I'd have to say it's the BEST story of the American experience ever brought to film. I say that knowing that it really is the urban Jewish-American experience and not one that is necessarily shared by other groups. I dont care for rigid definitions of the American experience because it can be a vastly differing one. Having said that though, I must still say that Avalon is a wonderful chronicling of an American immigrant family originaly from Eastern Europe who put down roots in the Avalon section of Baltimore. It is refreshing in that New York City is generally credited for this kind of narrative. So much so that it's easy to forget that ethnic communities sprang up in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco etc. Not just NYC. Through the narration of Sam Krichinsky we see his children and grandchildren grow up and he grow old. We are with him when his wife (Joan Plowright)passes away, When his son's business is destroyed by fire, when he argues with his oldest Brother and a great rift divides the Krichinskys forever. we hear his stories of this and that and always he returns to the 4th of July 1914 when he arrived in Baltimore for the first time. Levinson is fantastic as he films what is obviously an idealized representation seen only in Sam Krichinsky's "rose colored" memory of the event. There is so much poignance, sorrow, and love in "Avalon" and small details become deeply profound moments in the life of an elderly man struggling to remember the good times while the world moves on. The closing scene in which Sam's Grandson (now a father himself), with whom he has always had a close relationship, visits him in a nursing home. We know from Sam's state that the end cannot be far. Its a brief scene with little dialogue but it is AWESOME!!!! in the sublime way it conveys it's message. I choke up just thinking about that scene. See "Avalon"!!!

Was the above review useful to you?

9 out of 14 people found the following review useful:

A brilliant film...

10/10
Author: LisaAllen123 from Sterling VA
19 May 1999

Levinson does a spectacular job in showing us the life of a man and his family after coming to America and the different ways his offspring grows up. This film also shows how values have changed from the time that Sam was a young man to when his son Jules was in the workforce (the father, Sam was a wallpaper hanger eking out a meager existence and his son, Jules was a well to do salesperson with a country club membership). The father (Sam) could not understand why his son wanted to golf or why golfing was necessary at one point in the movie. It also dealt with the issue of the family eventually moving to the suburbs and how Jules' mother commented that she could not any longer take the streetcar when they lived in the suburbs. This film also shows us how television has changed the face of America. For example, Thanksgiving in an earlier part of the movie was spent at a dinner table, before the television was invented, and after the family has television, Thanksgiving dinner was spent in front of the TV.

Not bad performance acting wise by the cast the cinematography is also spectacular especially when Sam arrives in America on July 4th, 1916.

Barry you have done a great job of reminding us that what makes this a great country is fact that we should never forget our families, our traditions or where we come from.

Was the above review useful to you?

3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Looking back at the way we were

8/10
Author: jmcsween90 (jmcsween90@hotmail.com)
15 May 2001

The third of Barry Levinson's Baltimore trilogy (following ‘Diner' and ‘Tin Men') is a gentle and low key yet hugely impressive film that is a worthy successor to his enormously prosperous and Oscar winning ‘Rainman'. Although adopting the box office disaster strategy – ‘no stars just talent', Levinson manages to create a small yet thoroughly incisive look at the changing face of America and its values during an eventful period in its cultural history.

Set in the mid 1950's at the height of the post war economic boom and on the eve of Television's dominance of domestic life, ‘Avalon' looks closely and lovingly at the lives, loves and disasters of three generations of a Polish family in the New World. Opening with a magnificently shot flashback of Mueller-Stahl's arrival in America on July 4th some forty years earlier, the film develops a nostalgic yet never overtly sentimental approach to its subject matter and always keeps its story-line rooted firmly in reality.

Although the film has no specific plot or central character, the magnificent Mueller-Stahr emerges as the principal paternal figure trying to keep his increasingly disparate family of brothers, children, nephews, nieces and sundry together amidst the turning tides of cultural change. Joan Plowright plays his stubborn wife who has never learned to fully adapt to the lifestyles in the West, while his son Aidan Quinn is trying desperately to cash in on the American dream that brought his father to those shores in the first place.

A tale told with great colour, character and humour and populated with a huge assortment of human characters and memorable moments, 'Avalon' is a beautifully composed piece of American cinema.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 1 of 5:[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Ratings Awards
External reviews Official site Plot keywords
Main details Your user reviews Your vote history