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Madchen Amick on Reuniting with David Lynch on ‘Twin Peaks’ & Her Role in ‘Riverdale’ Season 2

9 hours ago | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Directed entirely by David Lynch, the 18-part Showtime limited events series Twin Peaks: The Return picked things up 25 years after the inhabitants of a quaint northwestern town were stunned by the shocking murder of their homecoming queen, Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee). While viewers are catching up with many familiar characters and learning about where their lives are now, they’re also getting a glimpse into some new characters, living their lives in other locations around the country. During this 1-on-1 phone interview with Collider, actress Mädchen Amick (who plays Shelly Johnson, a Twin Peaks local … »

- Christina Radish

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‘Game of Thrones’ to ‘Twin Peaks’: Here’s Why Your Favorite Quirky Characters Wear Eyepatches

24 June 2017 5:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

TV is full of characters that wear eyepatches for various reasons, and sometimes it’s simply to stand out among a huge cast.

When it comes to dramas like “Twin Peaks” or genre series like “Game of Thrones” or “The Walking Dead,” massive casts of characters allow for variety, whether it’s the run-of-the-mill diner waitress or the sword-swinging knight or the eyepatch-wearing neighbor.

Read More: Why One Company’s Attempt to Censor the Show Is the Worst Idea Ever

At the most basic level, an eyepatch sets a character apart, giving them a dangerous, rakish or even quirky air. Beloved by stereotypical pirates, the eyepatch has also been used to indicate that someone is a seafaring person.

But often, the eyepatch is used to signify some sort of trauma in the past. It’s also an easy way for a character to visibly show a badge of suffering without »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Game of Thrones’ to ‘Twin Peaks’: Here’s Why Your Favorite Quirky Characters Wear Eyepatches

24 June 2017 5:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

TV is full of characters that wear eyepatches for various reasons, and sometimes it’s simply to stand out among a huge cast.

When it comes to dramas like “Twin Peaks” or genre series like “Game of Thrones” or “The Walking Dead,” massive casts of characters allow for variety, whether it’s the run-of-the-mill diner waitress or the sword-swinging knight or the eyepatch-wearing neighbor.

Read More: Why One Company’s Attempt to Censor the Show Is the Worst Idea Ever

At the most basic level, an eyepatch sets a character apart, giving them a dangerous, rakish or even quirky air. Beloved by stereotypical pirates, the eyepatch has also been used to indicate that someone is a seafaring person.

But often, the eyepatch is used to signify some sort of trauma in the past. It’s also an easy way for a character to visibly show a badge of suffering without »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks’ Actor Brett Gelman Reveals David Lynch’s Secretive Casting Process

23 June 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Brett Gelman had no idea what was going on. He arrived on the set of “Twin Peaks” to play Burns, the supervisor of a casino where a dazed Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) was winning one jackpot after another. Other than that? Pure mystery. Somehow, the long-lost FBI agent had escaped the interdimensional “Black Lodge” where the show had left him trapped 25 years ago. Gelman’s character was tasked with confronting Cooper about his massive haul. In between takes, Gelman recalled saying to MacLachlan, “I can’t wait to see what this all means.”

“Yeah,” MacLachlan replied, “Me too.”

Lynch’s latest round of episodes with the cult show was surrounded by so much secrecy in the months leading up to its premiere that even the actors were left in the dark. Gelman only found out about his role from his Los Angeles neighbor, Johanna Ray, who happened to be the show’s casting director. »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Twin Peaks’ Actor Brett Gelman Reveals David Lynch’s Secretive Casting Process

23 June 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Brett Gelman had no idea what was going on. He arrived on the set of “Twin Peaks” to play Burns, the supervisor of a casino where a dazed Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) was winning one jackpot after another. Other than that? Pure mystery. Somehow, the long-lost FBI agent had escaped the interdimensional “Black Lodge” where the show had left him trapped 25 years ago. Gelman’s character was tasked with confronting Cooper about his massive haul. In between takes, Gelman recalled saying to MacLachlan, “I can’t wait to see what this all means.”

“Yeah,” MacLachlan replied, “Me too.”

Lynch’s latest round of episodes with the cult show was surrounded by so much secrecy in the months leading up to its premiere that even the actors were left in the dark. Gelman only found out about his role from his Los Angeles neighbor, Johanna Ray, who happened to be the show’s casting director. »

- Eric Kohn

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Great Job, Internet!: 2017’s most avant-garde documentary was filmed inside a ’90s superstore

23 June 2017 3:45 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

David Lynch must be kicking himself right now, because his attempt to induce a mass meditative state by making viewers watch a guy sweep the floor on Twin Peaks just got one-upped by a Washington woman’s dad. As Willamette Week explains, Kellie Rogers took some old tapes from her dad’s VHS camcorder to be transferred to DVD, only to discover that one tape contained a 26-minute chunk from the camcorder’s former life as a floor model in the electronics department at a Washington State Fred Meyer store.

Intrigued by the camera’s unblinking look into the everyday life of a ’90s superstore, Rogers took the tape to Reddit, whose detectives were able to determine that the footage was shot in the spring of 1992, thanks to the presence of Garth Brooks’ Ropin’ The Wind, the Wayne’s World soundtrack, Slaughter’s The Wild Life, and Pantera’s »

- Katie Rife

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Was Orphan Black Off Its Clone Game? Another Wayward Sis for Supernatural? Twin Peaks Hint Pays Off? And More Qs

23 June 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

We’ve got questions, and you’ve (maybe) got answers! With another week of TV gone by, we’re lobbing queries left and right about shows including Orphan Black, Better Call Saul, Supernatural and Pretty Little Liars!

1 | Regarding Reign‘s series-ending time jump, TVLine reader Melissa asks, “21 years later… and they never aged?”

RelatedReign Boss Reveals [Spoiler]’s Tragic Finale Fate: ‘He Did Not Survive’

2 | Was Orphan Black‘s Sarah/M.K. convo a rare instance of clone eyelines not matching up? Or are we being too nitpicky? (They did flawlessly exchange clothes.)

3 | It was only for a fictional Veep episode, »

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The Laura Dern-aissance: From Blacklisted After ‘Ellen’ to 2017 Scene-Stealer of ‘Big Little Lies’ and ‘Twin Peaks’

23 June 2017 8:25 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

A formidable actress, Laura Dern has been working in Hollywood since age 5. At 13 years old, the daughter of icons Diane Ladd and Bruce Dern became the youngest Miss Golden Globe and soon thereafter earned critical acclaim with her breakout role in Blue Velvet. The 1986 film also marked the first time Dern and director David Lynch would work together throughout her career, a pairing that continues with Twin Peaks’ celebrated return on Showtime.

Known for her highly emotive face, »

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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Rushes. Robert Pattinson Covers, Apichatpong x Ryuichi Sakamoto, "Girls Gone Wild 1863"

22 June 2017 5:01 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSBlind DetectiveThe San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will hosting what we believe—and correct us if we'r wrong—is the first significant retrospective in the United States of the great Hong Kong genre director Johnnie To.Recommended VIEWINGFor one more day only Gabe Klinger's Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater, a 2013 documentary about two directors on different ends of American independent cinema, will be available to watch for free on Vimeo.A lovely collaboration between Thai auteur Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives) and Japanese composer (and sometimes actor) Ryuichi Sakamoto on the video for a track on his new album, async. Related: the director and composer are holding a short film competition stemming from the album. Critics Christopher Small and James Corning have lately been contributing excellent video essays to the Notebook on such directors as William Friedkin, John Carpenter, and Ernst Lubitsch. For Fandor, they've made another excellent directorial dive, in this case into the contradictory cinema of Hollywood comedy director Leo McCarey.Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning shoot "Girls Gone Wild 1863" behind the scenes of Sofia Coppola's The Beguiled. Warning: risqué ankle footage!Recommended Reading

The new issues of Cahiers du cinéma (out now) and Cinema Scope (coming soon) both focus on the just-completely Cannes Film Festival and have Robert Pattinson in the Safdie brothers' Good Time on the cover. Cahiers editor Stéphane Delorme has written a scathing, and to our eyes accurate, assessment of the festival, which we're reading in (please excuse us) adapted Google translation:The program of the Official is truly a program, in the programmatic sense: it has encouraged a certain type of hateful, hollow and pretentious cinema which is becoming sadly the cinema of our time.... In this context, two small wonders emerged: Good Time by the Safdies and The Day After by Hong Sang-soo... Dumont, Garrel, Claire Denis, everyone would have deserved the Palme. Authors in an insolent form that are renewed (musical comedy, sex, comedy) and who still know what it means to stage, edit, plan.This week the great American actress Gina Rowlands celebrated her 85th birthday, and Sheila O'Malley has written an excellent article on her and some of her key performances for RogerEbert.com:Rowlands' work has a way of creating anxiety in viewers. The boundary line between character and actress is obliterated; or, it was never there in the first place. Her work is so unlike what we see from most other actresses (even very good ones) that it's unnerving to watch.Alfred Hitchcock on the set of RopeAmerican Cinematographer has republished an essential 1967 interview with "The Cameraman's Director," Alfred Hitchcock:Q: Do you feel that lighting is perhaps the most important single element in the creation of cinematic mood?

A: Motion picture mood is often thought of as almost exclusively a matter of lighting, dark lighting. It isn’t. Mood is apprehension. That’s what you’ve got in that crop-duster scene. In other words, as I said years and years ago, I prefer “murder by the babbling brook.” you’ve got some of that in The Trouble With Harry. Where did I lay the dead body? Among the most beautiful colors I could find. Autumn in Vermont. Went up there and waited for the leaves to turn. We did it in counterpoint. I wanted to take a nasty taste away by making the setting beautiful. I have sometimes been accused of building a film around an effect, but in my sort of film you often have to do that if you want to get something other than the cliche.We think it's safe to say that Twin Peaks: The Return, despite being 7 episodes and nearly as many hours in, remains a mystery. We're hosting on-going and in-depth recaps of the episodes as they premiere, and at Filmmaker magazine Michael Sicinski has proposed five ideas about David Lynch and Mark Frost's new...thing:This transfer of violent energy is connected to the Black Lodge [...] but more significantly it is related to the program before us. Lynch is warning us that Twin Peaks is not background TV, and that in certain respects it is dangerous stuff. Sorry, young lovers. You need to watch that glass box carefully, because you’re strapping in for the long haul.EXTRASSome jaw-dropping analysis by Jean-Luc Godard on the relationship between film and television, courtesy of critic Max Nelson.From the Filmadrid festival, a meeting of two great figures in the film world: scholar Laura Mulvey and filmmaker Jonas Mekas.Confirming the sense of humor of Robert Bresson (he who put Chaplin's The Gold Rush and City Lights as his favorite films) is this photo of the perhaps the greatest of all filmmakers riding the donkey that appeared in his masterpiece Au hazard Balthazar. »

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‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

21 June 2017 12:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

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Related storiesBen Stiller Explains the Importance of Celebrating Human Stories that 'Don't Center on Aliens or Robots' -- Nantucket Film Festival'Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

21 June 2017 12:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related storiesWhy Ben Stiller Put His Comedy Career On Hold After 'Zoolander 2''Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Emmys 2017: TV’s Top Showrunners Pick Their Favorite Shows

21 June 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Every awards show reflects the tastes of its voting pool. The Golden Globe Awards are voted on by obscure journalists from outlets no one has ever heard of. The People’s Choice Awards are voted on by people.

But the Emmys are voted on by the group whose opinion is most trusted by the folks who make television — other folks who make television. Those are the individuals who understand not only that making a great piece of television is hard, but also why it’s hard.

Showrunners, being the persons in charge, are the TV professionals who have the most holistic view of the craft. »

- Variety Staff

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Why the new Twin Peaks is way better than the original

21 June 2017 4:29 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

No longer beholden to the 90s TV networks, David Lynch is free to give us pure unadulterated weirdness – and it’s a brilliantly infuriating joy

An admission: the first series of Twin Peaks was slightly lost on me. I was 10 when it first aired; by the time I got around to watching it properly, the shock had been weakened.

I was missing out on its proper historical context. I wasn’t watching in the age it was made, when just a handful of channels churned out endless conventional dramas to a guaranteed audience of millions. But, more importantly, its influence had been too well absorbed into the mainstream. All the new ground David Lynch broke in 1990 had been aped and refined endlessly over the years, so it didn’t feel like I was witnessing anything particularly new.

Related: Twin Peaks recap: episode seven – welcome back, Agent Cooper!

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- Stuart Heritage

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David Lynch Returns to Lucca Film Fest for Special 'Twin Peaks' Event

20 June 2017 9:43 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

David Lynch is coming back to Tuscany for a special Twin Peaks event June 22 organized by the Lucca Film Festival. After premiering the new Twin Peaks in Los Angeles and Cannes, Lynch will present his show in person to audiences in Italy. He returns to the town after being honored by the Lucca Film Festival in 2014 with the festival’s lifetime achievement award.

It was in Lucca during his visit three years ago that Lynch first began dropping real clues about the return of Twin Peaks. He told the audience then that he would like to meet up with »

- Ariston Anderson

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‘Twin Peaks 3×07′ Review

20 June 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Twin Peaks so far has been moving at a steady pace, welcoming us back to the world of Twin Peaks, and keeping us questioning when things would really get moving. This week, we get to see an old reunion, an attempted assassination, and more signs that things never change in the little town of Twin Peaks.

This week, Diane (Laura Dern) comes face to face with evil Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) raising more questions than providing real answers. Dougie and Janey-e (Naomi Watts) have an encounter at the Lucky 7 offices which show that Agent Cooper may not be so dormant after all.

In this episode of Twin Peaks, we finally see some movement in the main story, as the evil Cooper puts his plans into action. Before that happens though he has a confrontation with Diane which may be some of the best scenes we’ve seen in Twin Peaks.

The »

- Paul Metcalf

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 7 Recap: …And That's Enough Said About That

20 June 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.So that's how David Lynch does an info dump. First, with a cheeky, knowing scene featuring the brothers Horne: "Jerry, what's going on?" asks Ben (Richard Beymer) after his cannabis-infused sibling (David Patrick Kelly) phones him from the woods. "I think I'm high!…I don't know where I am!" Jerry screams, perhaps speaking for a good subsection of the Twin Peaks revival audience, who have, over the six prior installments, been given only glimpses of a larger picture. Narrative momentum comes in asides; the more prevalent longueurs are reserved for atmosphere and mood, for full immersion in apparent stasis.Part 7 shakes things up, following the brotherly freak-out with several story reveals that come in quick succession. But there's a niggling sense throughout all the »

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Rushes. David Lynch Adman, Best Films of the 21st Century, Universal Cinema

20 June 2017 7:13 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSWe tend not to post much news about films currently in production, but we must admit our desire to share the bare details of Phoenix director Christian Petzold's new feature film, Transit, pictured above.Critic Godfrey Cheshire has launched a crowdfunding campaign for a handsome looking monograph on contemporary Iranian cinema.Recommended VIEWINGWith Twin Peaks: The Return currently unfolding, its profound oddness has sent many of us diving backwards into David Lynch's past work, remembering he is a visual artist first and foremost, one who has worked in serial television, narrative cinema, and, yes, commercial advertisement. This video usefully gathers all ads Lynch has made, from his 1988 add for Calvin Klein to his (brilliant) Dior ad from 2010 starring Marion Cotillard.A '90s cinema throwback! Lars von Trier introducing the Dogme »

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Dark Mood Woods: A Twin Peaks Podcast – Episode 7

19 June 2017 8:20 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Welcome to Dark Mood Woods: A Twin Peaks Podcast, in which Managing Editor Nick Newman and contributor Ethan Vestby discuss David Lynch‘s return to long-form filmmaking. This summer, join us as we offer insight and knowledge only devoted fans can bring, along with the curiosity of what, exactly, has been happening in the Pacific Northwest these last 25 years.

In this discussion, Zach Lewis (writer for Little White Lies, Mubi, and more) joins us to talk Episode 7 as Diane interrogates Evil Cooper, garbage is swept, Dougie Jones becomes a hero, and much more.

Subscribe on iTunes, follow on Soundcloud, or see below to stream/download (right-click and save as…).

MP3: Dark Mood Woods: A Twin Peaks Podcast – Episode 7

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Illustration by artist Ben Holmes.

E-mail us or respond on Twitter and Facebook with any questions or comments.

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- Ethan Vestby

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