7.2/10
242
7 user 13 critic

Sidewalk Stories (1989)

R | | Comedy | January 1990 (USA)
Nearly silent comedy filmed in black and white follows a street artist (Charles Lane), who rescues a baby after her father was murdered. The artist then sets off to find the mother, but has... See full summary »

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1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Tom Alpern ...
Bookseller
Nicole Alysia ...
Edwin Anthony ...
Penny Pincher #1
...
Doorman / Street Cop
Jeff Bates ...
Police Officer #2
Angel Cappellino ...
Bully's Mother
Jeffrey Carpentier ...
Homeless Native American
John Carr ...
S.O.B. Man
Vince Castelano ...
Child Customer #3
Jimmy Clohessy ...
Precinct Cop #2
...
Alley Tough #1
Tanya Cunningham ...
Girlfriend
Deena Engle ...
Park Mother #1
...
Bag Lady
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Storyline

Nearly silent comedy filmed in black and white follows a street artist (Charles Lane), who rescues a baby after her father was murdered. The artist then sets off to find the mother, but has to first learn how to care for the child. Ultimately he ends up in a horse drawn chase of the murderers. Written by John Sacksteder <jsackste@bellsouth.net>

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Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

January 1990 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Mesék a járdán  »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$131,433
See more on IMDbPro »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Director/actor Charles Lane giving directions to the other actors in the film. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A mostly-silent film in black and white
16 March 2001 | by See all my reviews

Our protagonist is resourceful, tenderhearted, homeless. He finds himself with a baby, someone else's, and suddenly his life shifts focus. The child, thankfully, does not redeem the main character whose actions are a natural extension of who he is-a nameless person. Without home and name doesn't mean without personality, and a life, and the instinct for survival. The main character suddenly has to be concerned for someone other than himself, and this is the charm of the film, charm without sentimentality.

This is an intriguing contrast of the humorous set against the plight of the homeless in NYC; it works, partly because it is so outrageous and comic in its implementation-e.g. the conflict with the other street artist, the use of the bathtub. A gentle, good film whose final moments still resonate in the mind, not because of their greatness, but because of the unexpected but successful shift in focus and technique. It achieves.

Charles Lane as writer, director, and main character has done a very fine job in three areas, none suffering because of the others.


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