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R.O.T.O.R. (1987) Poster

(1987)

Trivia

The art on the R.O.T.O.R. videocassette packaging appears to have been plagiarized from promotional artwork for Mad Max (1979).
The actor who played Shoe Boogie the jive-talking janitor is uncredited. As of early 2015, his identity has not been verified.
Popular Argentine rock band "El Mató a un Policía Motorizado" ("He killed a motorized policeman") takes their name from a line in this movie.
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The little white and red robot that moves around on Coldyron's desk throughout the movie is a Tomy OMS-B "Dingbot" or "Ding-Bo", a popular 1980s toy.
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Widely considered to be a low-budget copycat of the big-budget Hollywood blockbuster RoboCop (1987), R.O.T.O.R. shares two other elements with that film: the extensive use of filming locations in the vicinity of Dallas, Texas, and the appearance of actor Michael Hunter.
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Although dialogue identifies R.O.T.O.R. as a Dallas Police Department project, no actual Dallas police vehicles, buildings or uniformed officers are featured in the film. The end credits give thanks to the police departments of the surrounding communities of Addison, Coppell, Hickory Creek, and Lake Dallas for providing officers, uniforms, and vehicles, and Division Headquarters and the Tactical Operations Lab are private commercial office buildings in the Dallas area.
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When the narrator explains that Barrett Coldyron's papers are being given to his nephew Brett Coldyron at Oxford University, Brett is standing next to the Perkins Chapel and Bridwell Library at Southern Methodist University in University Park, Texas.
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Screenwriter Budd Lewis disowned the film after its release, blaming director Cullen Blaine and lead star Richard Gesswein for rewriting his original screenplay, eliminating most of the humor and inserting several extraneous scenes in order to replace parts of Lewis's screenplay that were deemed too expensive to film.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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