National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

15 items from 2016


Neca’s Santa Clark action figure from National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

20 June 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Here’s something that will help you have a fun, old-fashioned family Christmas, with Neca unveiling its Santa Clark figure, which is based on the likeness of Chevy Chase from the classic 1989 festive comedy National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation; check it out here…

This Christmas, in Clark’s quest for the perfect family gathering, he’ll short out Chicago’s power grid, electrocute a cat, battle a tree-loving squirrel, hold his boss hostage and spend some quality time with the local S.W.A.T. team… maybe it’ll be a Merry Christmas after all!

Celebrate more than 25 years of National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation with this retro clothed action figure from the hilarious holiday classic movie. Santa Clark stands 8” tall and is dressed in intricately tailored fabric clothing similar to the iconic toy lines of the 1970s. The figure features the authorized likeness of Chevy Chase and includes plenty »

- Amie Cranswick

Permalink | Report a problem


The Toy Box: Star Trek, Christmas Vacation, Rocky IV, The Big Lebowski & More

17 June 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The Toy Box is a weekly feature at /Film that will round up some of the newest and coolest collectibles, decorations, gadgets and other memorabilia that you nerds might want for your shelves. This week, The Toy Box has a variety of new Star Trek and Star Wars goodies along with new figures celebrating the […]

The post The Toy Box: Star Trek, Christmas Vacation, Rocky IV, The Big Lebowski & More appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

Permalink | Report a problem


Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

Follow our Twitter feed for faster news and bad jokes right here. And be our Facebook chum here.

Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Outre Eye of Daniel Xiii featuring: Holidays, Krampus, The Zero Boys and More!

25 April 2016 4:59 PM, PDT | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

Did ya miss me? Regardless, I’m back, baby!

Holidays

•             Release Date: In Theaters Now

•             Written By: Anthony Scott Burns, Kevin Kolsch, Nicholas McCarthy, Gary Shore, Kevin Smith, Sarah Adina Smith, Scott Stewart, Dennis Widmyer

•             Directed By: Anthony Scott Burns, Kevin Kolsch, Nicholas McCarthy, Adam Egypt Mortimer, Gary Shore, Kevin Smith, Sarah Adina Smith, Scott Stewart, Dennis Widmyer    

•             Starring: Seth Green and like 100 other people

What’s this? A new horror anthology centered around a myriad of holidays and helmed by some cats I really dig (I mean, c’mon; look at that list of die-rectors up there)? You know, normally I’d make some ridiculous pun alluding to the quality or lack thereof of whatever film was at hand, and this time I think I’ll do that, too. Let’s see if this one is going to be more treats than tricks, or just an overstuffed and overcooked turkey! »

- DanielXIII

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Christmas Vacation’ and ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star Doris Roberts Dies at 90

19 April 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Last night brought sad news from Hollywood as veteran actress Doris Roberts, the matriarch of the hit sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, passed away at 90 years old. While the cause of death is not immediately known, Roberts passed away peacefully overnight in her sleep at her home in Los Angeles. The actress has been seen […]

The post ‘Christmas Vacation’ and ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ Star Doris Roberts Dies at 90 appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

Permalink | Report a problem


Doris Roberts, 'Everybody Loves Raymond' Actress, Dead at 90

18 April 2016 5:33 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Doris Roberts, the longtime actress who for nine seasons played Ray Romano's meddling mother Marie on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, died Sunday night at her home in Los Angeles. Roberts was 90. The actress' son Michael Cannata confirmed his mother's death to Deadline, adding that Roberts died in her sleep of natural causes.

Roberts was nominated for seven Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Emmy Awards over the course of Everybody Loves Raymond's nine seasons and 210 episodes, taking home the award in 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2005. Roberts also won an »

Permalink | Report a problem


Doris Roberts, 'Everybody Loves Raymond' Star, Dies at 90

18 April 2016 4:42 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Doris Roberts, who played Ray Ramano's mother on "Everybody Loves Raymond," has died. She was 90.

TMZ was the first to report the news Monday, writing that Roberts died Sunday afternoon in Los Angeles. Her cause of death has not yet been revealed.

Though Roberts starred in movies like "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" and "Madea's Witness Protection," she was best known for her television work. In her lifetime, Roberts won four Emmy awards for her work on "Everybody Loves Raymond" and one for "St. Elsewhere."

Roberts continued working until very close to her death, with her last credit being "The Red Maple Leaf," slated for a 2016 release.

[Source: TMZ] »

- Rachel Horner

Permalink | Report a problem


Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

18 April 2016 4:27 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

18 April 2016 4:27 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra, »

- Carmel Dagan

Permalink | Report a problem


Doris Roberts Dead at 90

18 April 2016 3:57 PM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Doris Roberts, the beloved mom from "Everybody Loves Raymond," has died ... TMZ has learned. We're told Doris passed away Sunday at home in L.A. She won 5 Emmy awards, 4 of them for 'Raymond.' She's also starred in tons of other TV shows and movies, like "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" and "Grandma's Boy." She's survived by her son, Michael Cannata Jr., who she had with her first husband. Doris' second husband, William Goyen, died in 1983. Doris was 90 years old. »

- TMZ Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Get Ready for The Boss by Celebrating That Other Girl Scout Classic Troop Beverly Hills

7 April 2016 1:50 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Melissa McCarthy's new comedy, The Boss, arrives in theaters on Friday. Given McCarthy's string of box office successes, the movie seems primed to be a hit. And we're stoked too, but the premise of the film has us recalling another female-led comedy: The 1989 Shelley Long cult hit Troop Beverly Hills. Both films focus on women of means who enjoy living the high life but who have also been humbled in some way - The Boss's Michelle Darnell being sent to prison, and Troop's Phyllis Nefler facing an impending divorce. And both protagonists turn to the Girl Scouts (or »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

Permalink | Report a problem


Critic-Proof: 9 Movies Other Than Batman v Superman That Overcame Bad Reviews

30 March 2016 12:50 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Last weekend, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice illustrated a longstanding truth: More often than not, reviews don't make or break a movie. A given motion picture can receive fawning praise from the top critics in the country and audiences may skip it. The same movie could just as easily get negative reviews and audiences can politely ignore them. Case in point: BvS made more than $166 million domestically during its opening weekend even though it currently has a 28 percent "fresh" rating on the movie review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes. This isn't news, of course. More than a few summer blockbusters »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Pretty in Pink’ at 30: The Best and Worst Films of John Hughes

26 February 2016 2:32 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Before movies like “Say Anything” and “Perks of Being a Wallflower,” and TV shows like “Dawson’s Creek” and “My So Called Life,” John Hughes’ classic high school romance “Pretty in Pink” dared to depict teenage love with a poignancy and truthfulness that felt both natural and wildly sentimental. Released on February 28, 1986, it remains one of Hughes’ most beloved movies. On the 30th anniversary of “Pretty in Pink,” here’s a look back at John Hughes’ 10 finest films, plus five that didn’t quite make the grade.

The Best…

10) Uncle Buck (1989)

John Candy played the title role of a lovable oaf whose babysitting skills are put to the test in this lightweight yet undeniably funny family comedy. The fifth of eight Hughes films in which he appeared, Candy showed winning chemistry with 9-year old Macaulay Culkin in what remains a career highlight. Though a 1990 “Uncle Buck” sitcom starring Kevin Meaney »

- Matthew Chernov

Permalink | Report a problem


Taylor Swift's Fan Crashed Her Romantic Date With Calvin Harris, Casually Calls It "Dinner With Mom and Dad"

14 January 2016 7:22 AM, PST | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

As Taylor Swift and Calvin Harris likely stared deeply into each other's eyes during a romantic, candlelit dinner at the Giorgio Baldi Ristorante in Santa Monica on Tuesday, the cute couple was joined by an unexpected guest. A young fan of the pair named Ricky Selby asked to sit down at their table and ended up getting a too-good-to-pass-up Instagram opportunity. In the snap, Taylor looks super chic in a black dress and sparkly headband as she and Calvin smile for the camera. "Awesome dinner with mom and dad," Ricky hilariously wrote. Check it out above, and then see cute moments from Taylor and Calvin's snowy Christmas vacation! Tall Image Source: Getty / Raymond Hall »

- Quinn Keaney

Permalink | Report a problem


All Aboard! Ellen DeGeneres and Wife Portia de Rossi Join Kendall Jenner and Harry Styles on Their Yacht in St. Barts

2 January 2016 7:00 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

While rumors continue to swirl around Kendall Jenner and Harry Styles spending quality time together over the holiday, the two were joined by a couple surprising quests on Friday. Aboard a yacht in St. Barts, Ellen DeGeneres, 57, and wife Portia de Rossi, 42, joined Styles and Jenner for lunch and frolicking in the sun. Jenner, 20, dressed in a white bikini, was all smiles with DeGeneres and de Rossi on the sundeck. The duo arrived by speed boat. Earlier in the day, Kris Jenner and boyfriend Corey Gamble visited the twosome on the yacht. Kris, 60, had flown back to St. Barts after »

- Caitlin Keating, @caitkeating

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003

15 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners