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The Last Warrior (1989)

Coastwatcher (original title)
The biggest Japanese destroyer "Yamato" is badly damaged in a battle and shall be repaired at a small island in the Pacific which is inhabited only by Gibb, an US American observation post,... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

(screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Gibb
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Katherine (as Maria Holvöe)
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Imperial Marine
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Priest
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2nd Imperial Marine
Al Karaki ...
3rd Imperial Marine
Peggy Champion ...
Nun
Victoria Cooper ...
Nun
Ingrid Emsley ...
Nun
Pippa Duffy ...
Nun
Eva Davis ...
Nun
Sheryl Burton ...
Polynesian Girl
Peter Butler ...
Deck Hand
Ivan D. Lucas ...
Deck Hand (as Ivan Lucas)
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Storyline

The biggest Japanese destroyer "Yamato" is badly damaged in a battle and shall be repaired at a small island in the Pacific which is inhabited only by Gibb, an US American observation post, and a few aborigines with their priest. Gibb and young novice Katherine can flee, but are tracked by two Japanese soldiers. After Gibb kills one of them, the other seeks revenge in a sword duel. Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

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Genres:

Action | Drama | War

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

8 September 1989 (South Africa)  »

Also Known As:

The Last Warrior  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This World War II movie set on a Pacific Island features an American officer, a Swedish nun and a Japanese soldier. As such, this movie utilizes character set ups used previously in both Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison (1957) (a lone American soldier and lone Irish nun) and Hell in the Pacific (1968) (a lone Japanese soldier and a lone American soldier), two World War II war movies with minimal characters in isolationist Pacific Island settings. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Well shot, and pretty engaging
26 May 2006 | by (Devon, United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

When i bought the DVD release and watched it for the first time, i had no clue what to expect. I'd not heard anything about this movie so i was expecting it to not be so good. :P But i was pleasantly surprised, especially with the beginning half of the film.

The cinematography is a big pull in this film, with some beautiful visual moments and some really gripping fight and stalking scenes. The use of light and water was brilliant, and the setting complimented perfectly. By the 20 minutes mark, i unfortunately wanted to throttle the music composer, but luckily the repetitive throbbing tones that accompanied a particular fight subsided and didn't return to any great extent.

It also gets big plot points for not going at all in the direction i was expecting. It was something of a double-take for me in the latter half, and in a good way. Despite being touted as a martial-arts type film, i'd not put too much expectation on that side of the action. The fights are pleasingly realistic, meaning there's less martial and more grappling and desperation. I prefer a film to be gritty, and i like the way this one went.

The cast worked well, Gary Graham held the film together pretty good and communicated a character i'd want to know more about. Another viewer commented on the small cast, and i agree it was quite unusual and quite nice too - it left room for focus on scenes, shots and the visual aspect.

There were only a few cringe moments, and they were overwhelmed with the good. Definitely worth a look, not least for the cinematography.


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